Scientific Name

Aeonium arboreum var. atropurpureum (W.A. Nicholson) A.Berger

Common Names

Purple Rose, Purple Aeonium

Synonyms

Aeonium atropurpureum, Aeonium arboreum f. atropurpureum, Aeonium manriqueorum f. atropurpureum

Scientific Classification

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Aeonium

Description

Aeonium arboreum var. atropurpureum is a striking, dark-purple succulent which forms branched stems up to 3 feet (90 cm) tall. The rosettes are formed at the ends of the stems. It bears large pyramidal panicles of bright yellow flowers in spring.

Photo by Phil Bendle

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 9b to 11b: from 25 °F (−3.9 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Tree Aeonium grows best in full sun during the cooler months and when grown in coastal areas. When grown inland or during the summer, provide this succulent with afternoon or partial shade. Avoid placing Tree Aeoniums in sites with western sun exposures.

Though Tree Aeoniums tolerate a variety of soil types, as long as they’re well-drained, it prefers light, porous soil. You may want to amend your planting site with sand and limestone chips. For container gardening, plant Tree Aeonium in a moderately moist medium with excellent drainage.

This drought tolerant plant hates water around its roots, so be careful to avoid excessive watering. In the wild, these succulents go dormant in summer, so water sparingly during the hotter months, allowing plants to dry out between waterings. In the winter, reduce watering to once per month.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for a Tree Aeonium (Aeonium arboreum).

Origin

Aeonium arboreum var. atropurpureum is native to Gran Carnaria Island in the Canary Islands.

Links

  • Back to genus Aeonium
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

Photo Gallery

Photo via flickr.comPhoto by Phil Bendle

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Aeonium arboreum var. atropurpureum ‘Black Rose’

Aeonium arboreum var. atropurpureum ‘Black Rose’: Similar to Aeonium ‘Zwartkop’. Dark tones, almost black with highlights of ruby red splashed throughout the leaves. If left to grow, the plant becomes quite tall, taking on a palm appearance. Good houseplant near sunny windows.

PLEASE NOTE: Leaves may curl or become bruised during shipping. They will recover with proper light and water and by growing and shedding old leaves. See photo examples:

Soft succulents will not survive a hard frost, but if there is a risk of freezing temperatures they can be brought indoors to grow on a sunny window sill or under a grow light. They need bright sunlight, great drainage, and infrequent water to prevent rot. Pick containers with drainage holes and use well-draining cactus and succulent soil with 50% to 70% mineral grit such as coarse sand, pumice, or perlite. Water deeply enough for water to run out the drainage hole, then wait for the soil to fully dry before watering again.

This variety is easy to re-root from stem cuttings. Look to our Succulent Cuttings Guide for tips on succulent propagation.

Full Aeonium Guide

Aeonium arboreum ‘Zwartkop’

Black Rose, Black Beauty, Black Tree Aeonium, Black Aeonium, Black Head

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Aeonium

Aeonium arboreum ‘Zwartkopf’ is a striking succulent with clumps, up to 3 feet (90 cm) tall, of gray-brown stems that often branch near their base. The long, bare stems hold large terminal rosettes, up to 8 inches (20 cm) in diameter, of very dark purple, almost black leaves. In summer, yellow, star-shaped flowers appear in long, conical clusters from the center of the rosettes of mature plants, after which the stems bearing the flower die to the ground.

Photo via wikimedia.org

USDA hardiness zones 9b to 11b: from 25 °F (−3.9 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

Water Black Roses deeply until the water drains through the bottom of the container about once a week from spring to fall. Allow the soil to dry until it is slightly moist at the root level between waterings. During the winter, reduce watering to once a month. Black Roses planted in the ground require less watering than container plants, so feel the soil a few inches down near the roots to check for moisture. If it feels completely dry, water deeply.

Fertilize with water-soluble 10-10-10 fertilizer diluted to half-strength once a month from spring to fall

Spray Black Roses with insecticidal soap or neem oil thoroughly at the first sign of aphids or pests. Repeat this weekly until the pests are gone.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for a Black Rose Aeonium.

Cultural problems can cause massive damage to Black Roses, including leaf loss. Soggy soil and over-watering are perhaps the most common and serious cultural issues for these succulents because too much water will drown the roots and may lead to root rot, particularly during cold weather.

Learn more at Why Are Leaves Falling Off My Black Rose?

Aeonium arboreum ‘Zwartkop’ is a popular cultivar of Aeonium arboreum. The cultivar name “Zwartkop” comes from the Dutch word, meaning “black head”. It can also refer to the German word “Schwartzkopf” or “Schwarzkopf”, both of which mean “black head”.

Forms and Hybrids

  • Aeonium ‘Blushing Beauty’
  • Aeonium ‘Cyclops’
  • Aeonium ‘Plum Purdy’
  • Aeonium ‘Zwartkin’
  • Aeonium simsii x ‘Zwartkop’
  • Back to genus Aeonium
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

Photo via plantsrescue.comPhoto via telegraph.co.ukPhoto via maryflower.co.nz

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Aeonium arboreum ‘Schwarzkopf’

Exotic succulents for conservatories or very mild gardens. Plants produce a tall yellow pyramid of flowers. These perennial succulents can only be grown outside in the very mildest of gardens where there is danger of only slight frost and the soil is free draining. Otherwise they make excellent house or conservatory plants. If deprived of light (in winter, particularly), they loose some of their purple-ness and turn green in parts. The purple-ness returns with the return of the sun.

In their native country they sometimes seem to prefer shadier spots. They will tolerate a fair bit of our weaker British sunshine so if you have one growing inside ensure it still gets plenty of light, although not a very sunny windowsill. If grown in a pot make sure you don’t over water (easily done) especially in winter and early spring before growth starts, otherwise rot quickly sets in and reduces roots to a mushy mess. However, if this does occur all is not lost. Take the remaining bits of healthy rosette or rosettes, remove the lower rotten section and place them in a seed tray filled with perlite – they should root out quite quickly. Aphids and slugs seem to be the most common pests but apart from that Aeoniums are pretty easy plants to grow and keep.

Propagated by us from cuttings.

Features Hardiness rating
IF IT HAS A RED TRAFFIC LIGHT

Hardy in Atlantic Seaboard gardens, The Channel Islands, gardens in Central London (and other large cities) and conservatories.

This is only meant as a guide; there are some plants with red labels that would only survive in extremely favoured spots such as The Isles of Scilly or coastal south-west Ireland.

We’re always on hand to give advice about plants and their frost hardiness.

Please remember that these coloured labels are only a rough guide.

General Point about Plant Hardiness: The commonly held belief that it’s better to ‘plant small’ is perfectly true with herbaceous plants, but not necessarily true with woody plants. They need some ‘wood’ on them to survive severe cold – so plants of marginal hardiness in very cold areas should really be planted LARGER, rather than smaller, wherever possible.

Conservatories, Exotics, Grown by Us, House Plants, Mediterranean, Pots, Seaside, Soil – Dry/Well drained

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