Amelanchier Lamarckii multi stem in our garden

We Have two of these Amelanchier Lamarckii multi stem in our courtyard area. Picture below shows how they were looking in late October.

The rust coloured leaves looked very striking, however they are then supposed to turn red. This didn’t happen, they just fell off in early November, probably something to do with the weather conditions.

Both of these multi stem Amelanchiers were smothered in white flowers in late April, early May. They would probably have bloomed earlier if they had been planted in a full sun position. We did have Amelanchier in our Aberdeen garden but never really got the benefit of it due to overplanting. I now appreciate the praise which this tree receives.

Slideshow of our Aberdeen garden

Plant details for Amelanchier Lamarckii multi stem

Dormant in Winterr but from April till November this Amelanchier adds great interest to the garden.

Lamarckii is more often grown as a multi stem tree which is suitable for the smaller garden. Also known as serviceberry or juneberry.

In early/mid Spring the tree is smothered in white star like blooms followed by leaves of an attractive copper colour which turn green in early Summer.

The small red berries in Summer turn black in autumn, well that’s if the birds havent got to them. The blackbirds in particular love them.

In Autumn the leaves turn a rusty shade and then a striking red.

Amelanchier Lamarckii multi stem unsurprisingly received the RHS award of garden merit.

Quick read details

  • Hardiness – fully hardy
  • Height – 4mtrs/13ft after 20 years if unpruned
  • Flower – masses of star-shaped white blooms in Spring
  • Leaves – opening copper colour in Spring turning green in Summer and then orange/red in Autumn
  • Berries – red in Summer turning black
  • Common name – juneberry, serviceberry, snowy mespilus
  • Soil – free draining moist soil neutral to slightly acidic
  • Position – full sun/partial shade

For those of us with only postage stamp-size gardens to play with, perhaps the very hardest decision to get right is trees. Pick the wrong one and in a few short years it will swallow up every inch of precious space, block out light and may even wreak havoc with your foundations. But if you don’t plant one at all – out of fear of such setbacks – you miss out on one of the best ways to bring structure and seasonal interest to your plot; not to mention welcome shade, tasty harvests and a magnet for wildlife. For me a garden without a tree just isn’t a garden.

So as the autumn tree-planting season is well and truly upon us, here is a selection of species that will sit perfectly in even the tiniest of gardens. All of them are easy to grow (and source), should never grow more than 5m tall and yet have the character and form of a much larger, mature tree – just in miniature. Let’s kick off in order of size.

Amelanchier Alnifolia ‘Obelisk’

Chic choice: Amelanchier Alnifolia ‘Obelisk’ Photograph: Alamy

The choice for designers of chic city gardens, this North American native has it all. White clouds of pretty spring blossom give way to a summer of tasty purple blueberry-like fruit, before the leaves turn blazing bronze in the autumn. All this on a stunning, branching mini tree that won’t grow more than 4m tall and barely over 1m wide, so small it can even be grown in a patio pot. There’s a good reason why they are guaranteed to grace half the entries in the “small garden” category at Chelsea Flower Show every year.

Liquidambar Styraciflua ‘Gum Ball’

Legends of the fall: Liquidambar leaves. Photograph: Getty Images

Clever tricks performed at plant nurseries have resulted in a horticultural miracle. This species is an American forest giant, but has been turned into one of the tiniest garden trees, no more the 4m tall and 2m wide, yet with the same stunning star-shaped, maple-like leaves which erupt into crimson, purple and orange in the autumn. The ingenious idea of grafting the branches of this variety on to regular liquidambar trunks has created a super neat, surgically enhanced new form of the tree, which produces a dense “lollipop” canopy of foliage atop a perfectly straight stem.

Magnolia ‘Jane Platt’

If it’s show-stopping spring flowers you’re after, it’s got to be a magnolia. While there are many dwarf flowering cherries out there, for me these trees lack the naturalistic character of magnolias. A magnolia will always look like a proper tree, rather than a stunted sakura sapling.There are loads of small ones to pick from, but the delicate feather-like petals of M stellata ‘Jane Platt’ take some beating. All this on a tree that rarely ever reaches more than 3m tall by 3m wide.

Email James at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter @Botanygeek

Serviceberry

Serviceberry Tree

This small tree thrives through all four seasons and offers so much to any garden. Abundant white blooms in spring are followed by delicious berries in summer, fiery foliage in fall, and silver bark in winter.

genus name
  • Amelanchier
light
  • Part Sun,
  • Shade,
  • Sun
plant type
  • Shrub,
  • Tree
height
  • 8 to 20 feet,
  • 20 feet or more
width
  • 4 to 15 feet wide
flower color
  • White
season features
  • Spring Bloom,
  • Colorful Fall Foliage
problem solvers
  • Drought Tolerant
special features
  • Low Maintenance,
  • Attracts Birds
zones
  • 2,
  • 3,
  • 4,
  • 5,
  • 6,
  • 7,
  • 8,
  • 9
propagation
  • Seed,
  • Stem Cuttings

Serviceberry

Blooms, Berries, and Foliage

Serviceberry trees display white blooms just before their foliage emerges in early spring, offering some of the earliest sources of nectar for pollinators. The five-petaled flowers closely resemble apple blossoms but with skinnier petals.

After the show of these blooms, clusters of edible berries form. As summer begins, berry colors ripen to a deep red then purple color. The berries make a wonderful substitute for blueberries and can be eaten fresh or made into jams and jellies.

Serviceberry foliage has an open and loose habit. This allows dappled light to shine through, which creates a space for part-shade plants to sit below the base of serviceberry trees. As nights cool down in autumn, blue-green foliage transforms into beautiful shades of orange and red.

Learn more about finding the perfect tree for your yard.

Serviceberry Care Must-Knows

Serviceberry’s habits are extremely versatile. They can be treated as either a large shrub or a small tree. Some species of serviceberry can sucker and create spreading colonies. In their natural habitat, these trees tend to do well in part shade.

Take a look at more small trees for your yard.

Serviceberry trees encounter very few problems. If you experience a particularly dry and hot summer, spider mites could appear on the foliage. In most cases, this will cause no long-term damage to the health of the tree; the effects are merely cosmetic. Serviceberry trees grow fast and can quickly fill a garden.

See more berry trees that birds love.

More Varieties of Serviceberry

‘Regent’ Serviceberry

Amelanchier alnifolia ‘Regent’ is a compact shrub that grows 6 feet tall and 4 feet wide. Native plant to the American Great Plains, it is quite drought tolerant. Its deep purple fruits make delicious jams, jellies, or pies. Zones 2-7

Common Serviceberry

Amelanchier arborea is also known as downy serviceberry, a reference to the fine hairs on its leaves and twigs. In cultivation, it grows 15 to 25 feet tall and wide, but in native woodlands it may reach 40 feet tall. Its fall color is a delightful mix of orange, red, and gold. Zones 4-9

‘Autumn Brilliance’ Serviceberry

Amelanchier ‘Autumn Brilliance’ is a hybrid with exceptional fall color ranging from orange to red with gold overtones. It grows 15 to 25 feet tall and wide. Zones 4-9

‘Cumulus’ Allegheny Serviceberry

Amelanchier laevis ‘Cumulus’ is a narrow upright small tree that grows 25 feet tall and 12 feet wide. It is covered with clouds of white blossoms in spring. The purple fruits and red-orange fall color extend its seasons of beauty. Zones 4-8

Apple Serviceberry

Amelanchier X grandiflora is a hybrid with a graceful rounded form. It grows 20 to 25 feet tall and wide and bears profuse white blooms that are sometimes tinged pink. The pinkish-purple fruits resemble miniature apples. It is quite drought tolerant. Zones 3-8

Combination Dominant boat types: those most frequent or preferred / Presence of Serviceberry, Amelanchier alnifolia

You may display the datapoints for this variable combination on a given phylogeny.

  • Variable
    • Dominant boat types: those most frequent or preferred
    • Presence of Serviceberry, Amelanchier alnifolia
  • Show/hide Labels
WNAI163 WNAI42
North Tlingit
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Tlingit
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Haida (Northern)
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Haida (Southern)
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Tsimshian
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Gitxsan
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Haisla
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Haihais
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Heiltsuk
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Kwakwaka’wakw
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Nuxalk
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Nuu chah nulth
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Makah
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Klahoose
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Pentlatch
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Squamish
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Cowichan
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
West Saanich
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Stó:lō
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Musqueam
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Lummi
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Klallam
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Twana
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Quinault
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Puyallup
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Quileute
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Lower Chinook
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Tillamook
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Alsea
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Siuslaw
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Coos
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Tututni
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Chetco
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Taltushtuntede
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Tolowa
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Yurok
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Karuk
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Hupa
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Wiyot
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Sinkyone
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Mattole-Bear River
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Nongatl
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Cahto
  • Balsa
  • Present
Shasta (East)
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Shasta (West)
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Chimariko
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Wintu (Trinity River)
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
Wintu (McCloud River)
  • 2 and 6
  • Present
Wintu (Sacramento River)
  • 2 and 6
  • Present
Nomlaki
  • Balsa
  • Present
Achumawi (East)
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Achumawi (West)
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Atsugewi
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Valley Maidu
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Foothill Maidu
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Maidu
  • Dugout canoe
  • Absent
Nisenan (Foothill)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Nisenan (Mountain)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Nisenan (Southern)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Coast Yuki
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Yuki
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Yana
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Northern Pomo
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Eastern Pomo
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Southern Pomo
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Wappo
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Patwin
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Northern Miwok
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Central Sierra Miwok
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Southern Miwok
  • Balsa
  • Absent
North Fork Mono
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Kings River Western Mono
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Northern Foothills Yokuts
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Kings River Yokuts
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Wukchumni
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Southern Valley Yokuts (Lake)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Southern Valley Yokuts (Yauelmani)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Kawaiisu
  • No boats or rafts
  • Absent
Salinan
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Tongva
  • Plank canoe
  • Absent
Luiseño
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Cupeño
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Serrano
  • No boats or rafts
  • Absent
Cahuilla (Desert)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Cahuilla (Pass)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Cahuilla (Mountain)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Kumeyaay (Mountain Diegueno)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Kumeyaay (Western Diegueno)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Kumeyaay (Desert Diegueno)
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Kiliwa
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Akwa’ala
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Dakelh (Alkatcho Carrier)
  • Bark canoe
  • Present
Dakelh (Lower Carrier)
  • Bark canoe
  • Present
Chilcotin
  • Bark canoe
  • Present
Shuswap
  • Bark canoe
  • Present
Lillooet
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Nlaka’pamux
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Syilx
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Sanpoil
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Sinkiuse-Columbia
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Wenatchi
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Coeur d’Alene
  • Bark canoe
  • Present
Kalispel
  • Bark canoe
  • Present
Bitterroot Salish
  • Bark canoe
  • Present
Kutenai
  • Bark canoe
  • Present
Nez Perce
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Umatilla
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Klikitat
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Wishram
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Tenino
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Klamath
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Modoc
  • Dugout canoe
  • Present
Wadadokado
  • Balsa
  • Present
Kidutokado
  • Balsa
  • Present
Kuyuidokado
  • Balsa
  • Present
Eastern Mono
  • Balsa
  • Present
Tümpisa Shoshone (Panamint)
  • No boats or rafts
  • Absent
Washo
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Mahaguaduka
  • No boats or rafts
  • Absent
Spring Valley Shoshoni
  • No boats or rafts
  • Absent
Wadaduka
  • Balsa
  • Absent
White Knife Shoshoni
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Gosiute
  • No boats or rafts
  • Absent
Bohogue
  • Balsa
  • Present
Agaiduka
  • Balsa
  • Present
Hukundika
  • Balsa
  • Present
Wind River Eastern Shoshone
  • Round hide boat
  • Present
Uintah Ute
  • No boats or rafts
  • Present
Uncompahgre Ute
  • Round hide boat
  • Present
Southern Ute
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
Shivwits
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Southern Paiute (Kaibab and Las Vegas)
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
San Juan
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
Chemehuevi
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Havasupai
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Hualapai
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Yavapai (Northeast)
  • No boats or rafts
  • Absent
Yavapai (Southeast)
  • No boats or rafts
  • Absent
Mojave
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Quechan
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Kamia
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Cocopa
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Maricopa
  • Balsa
  • Absent
Pima
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Tohono O’odham
  • No boats or rafts
  • Absent
Western Apache (North Tonto)
  • No boats or rafts
  • Absent
Western Apache (South Tonto)
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Western Apache (San Carlos)
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Western Apache (Cibecue)
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Western Apache (White Mountain)
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Chiricahua (Warm Springs)
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Chiricahua (Huachuca)
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Mescalero
  • Log or pole raft
  • Absent
Lipan Apache
  • Round hide boat
  • Absent
Jicarilla
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
Navajo (Western)
  • No boats or rafts
  • Present
Navajo (Eastern)
  • No boats or rafts
  • Present
Hopi
  • No boats or rafts
  • Present
Zuni
  • No boats or rafts
  • Present
Acoma
  • No boats or rafts
  • Present
Sia
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
Santa Ana
  • No boats or rafts
  • Present
Kewa
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
Cochiti
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
Ohkay Owingeh
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
San Ildefonso
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
Santa Clara
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
Nambé Pueblo
  • No boats or rafts
  • Present
Taos
  • No boats or rafts
  • Present
Isleta
  • Log or pole raft
  • Present
Jemez
  • No boats or rafts
  • Present

Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Ballerina’ (Apple serviceberry ‘Ballerina’)

Botanical name

Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Ballerina’

Other names

Genus

Amelanchier Amelanchier

Variety or Cultivar

‘Ballerina’ _ ‘Ballerina’ is a vigorous, multi-stemmed, deciduous shrub or small tree with oval, mid-green leaves that turn orange or red in autumn. Large, white flowers in summer are followed by purple-black fruit in autumn.

Foliage

Deciduous

Habit

Rounded, Spreading

Awards

RHS AGM (Award of Garden Merit)

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Colour

Flower

Flushed pink, White in Spring

Bronze in Spring; Green in Summer; Red, Orange in Autumn

How to care

Watch out for

Specific diseases

Fireblight

General care

Propagation methods

Semi-hardwood cuttings

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Where to grow

Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Ballerina’ (Apple serviceberry ‘Ballerina’) will reach a height of 5m and a spread of 4m after 10-20 years.

Suggested uses

City, Hedging/Screens, Low Maintenance

Cultivation

Grow in moist, but well-drained lime-free soil. Grow in full sun for the best autumn colour.

Soil type

Clay, Sandy

Soil drainage

Moist but well-drained, Well-drained

Soil pH

Acid, Neutral

Light

Partial Shade, Full Sun

Aspect

North, South, East, West

Exposure

Exposed, Sheltered

UK hardiness Note: We are working to update our ratings. Thanks for your patience.

Hardy (H4)

USDA zones

Zone 9, Zone 8, Zone 7, Zone 6, Zone 5, Zone 4

Defra’s Risk register #1

Plant name

Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Ballerina’ (Apple serviceberry ‘Ballerina’)

Common pest name

grape ground pearl

Scientific pest name

Margarodes vitis

Type

Insect

Current status in UK

Absent

Likelihood to spread to UK (1 is very low – 5 is very high)

Impact (1 is very low – 5 is very high)

General biosecurity comments

Main pathway; Vitis spp. plants for planting; already prohibited. However; further consideration of other pathways is required.

Defra’s Risk register #2

Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Ballerina’ (Apple serviceberry ‘Ballerina’)

Round headed apple tree borer

Saperda candida

Insect

Absent

American wood boring beetle; single European incursion into a German Island in the Baltic; limited likelihood of introduction into the UK due to small volume of trade and import inspections. Possible EU listing will limit risk further.

Defra’s Risk register #3

Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Ballerina’ (Apple serviceberry ‘Ballerina’)

Lance nematode; Nematode; Lance

Hoplolaimus spp.

Nematode

Absent

Nematode species potentially affecting a wide variety of crops; prohibition of soil likely to mitigate risk substantially; keep under review in light of interceptions or findings should they occur in the EU.

About this section

Our plants are under greater threat than ever before. There is increasing movement of plants and other material traded from an increasing variety of sources. This increases the chances of exotic pests arriving with imported goods and travellers, as well as by natural means. Shoot is working with Defra to help members to do their part in preventing the introduction and spread of invasive risks.

Traveling or importing plants? Please read “Don’t risk it” advice here

Suspected outbreak?

Date updated: 7th March 2019 For more information visit: https://planthealthportal.defra.gov.uk/

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