• Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July to September
  • Hardiness: half hardy (may need winter protection)
    Striking, semi-double, bright vermilion-red flowers appear from July to September above the deeply divided, dark bronze-red leaves. This popular, peony-flowered dahlia requires a sunny site with fertile, humus-rich soil. Perfect for a planting scheme based on ‘hot’ colours, the tubers must be lifted and over-wintered in a frost-free place in all but the warmest areas.
  • Garden care: Dahlia tubers can be planted outside after frost, or started off in pots under glass in late winter to early spring. Plant them horizontally approximately 12cm deep, making sure the ‘eyes’ are uppermost. Allow enough room between each tuber so the plants can grow and spread to their full size without being over-crowded. While in growth, provide a high-nitrogen liquid feed each week in June, then a high-potash fertiliser each week from July to September. Stake with canes or brushwood if it becomes necessary. In mild areas, leave them in situ over winter, but protect the crown with a generous layer of dry mulch. In colder areas, carefully lift and clean the tubers once the first frosts have blackened the foliage and allow them to dry naturally indoors. Then place the dry tubers in a shallow tray, just covered with slightly moist potting compost, sand or vermiculite and store in a frost-free place until planting out again.
  • CAUTION do not eat ornamental bulbs

Foliage Dahlia Bishop of Llandaff

The striking red flowers of Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’ bloom against stunning burgundy foliage. This is a vigorous, heritage variety dating back to the 1920’s. It has been tried, tested and loved by gardeners around the world. Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’ is even in the RHS top 200 plants of all time.

The semi double, vermillion red flowers open from late Summer deep into autumn. The burgundy foliage adds a little something special to the garden.

Dahlias are brilliant garden plants. They are long flowering, with lush foliage, come in a huge array of colours shapes and sizes, and are easy to care for. Dahlias are suitable for growing in garden beds or large pots.

Dahlias take around eight weeks from planting to flowering and can be grown in gardens or pots.
Plant Dahlias into moist, humus rich, well drained soil in a sunny spot, they need at least six hours to flower well. We recommend digging a well rotted manure though the soil prior to planting. Plant the tuber around 10cm deep, and it is a good idea to stake tall/large flowered varieties at the time of planting to avoid root disturbance later on. Allow for good air flow between the plants. You don’t need to water your Dahlias in, just keep them moist once they start to grow. Add a slow release tomato fertiliser in early summer and some Sulphate of Potash, then mulch for best results.

Dahlia flowers are excellent for cutting, and last well in a vase, and by cutting the flowers you will encourage more blooms. When you cut the flowers, it is a good idea to do it in the morning as they have higher moisture content and so will last longer. Cut the stems so you are taking at least two leaves, this prunes the plant back far enough to encourage more flowers and bushy growth. Any spent flowers left on the plant should be removed as they brown, in a similar method to encourage more blooms.

Dahlia tubers don’t really need to be lifted if the soil is well drained and you don’t live in areas where the soil will freeze or get overly moist in their dormancy.

Dahlias were discovered in Mexico in the 1700’s. They were named after the Swedish botanist, Anders Dahl.

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