Can I eat those small plums on the tree in my yard?

One of the best things about summer is potato salad, and if you’re in need of a game-changer, you’ll want to check out Bonnie S. Benwick’s tips for cooking perfect potatoes. Then you’ll want to try (all of!) the accompanying recipes. Now you know summer’s really here.

Also in Food this week: Entrepreneurs in the Washington area have figured out how to cut food waste by rescuing ugly produce that might otherwise go to the landfill and turning it into soups, fruit chips and other products; Whitney Pipkin has the story. And Unearthed columnist Tamar Haspel goes to Africa to learn how to help farmers there succeed — and decides that engaging them in the debate about GMOs isn’t part of the equation.

There’s plenty more to keep you busy, including today’s Free Range chat at noon. Tamar will be there to help answer questions, so you should be there, too. Here’s a warmup to get you in the spirit — a leftover from last week’s chat:

The purple-leafed plum tree in my yard not only had flowers for the first time this year but is loaded with small, immature plums. Are these good for jams or other preserves? Any suggestions on sweetening levels — should they be comparable to regular plum preserve recipes?

How lucky to have your own Prunus cerasifera, commonly known as the cherry plum. For those of you who aren’t so lucky, read on and I’ll tell you how to find one in the urban landscape that’s yours for the picking.

Once your little plums ripen, in midsummer, they’ll be edible, though probably fairly sour, depending on the particular cultivar you have. It’s good that your tree is loaded, because you’ll be in competition with the local birds, which also like them.

Now, what to do with them? Well, if you’re a drinking man — or woman — I’d be remiss if I didn’t recommend DIY columnist Cathy Barrow’s recipe for slivovitz. Some folks insist that you can’t make this distilled beverage unless you have Italian prune plums, and certainly your cherry plums will produce a different flavor, but plenty of people use cherry plums in this way. If you like what you get, decant it into pretty bottles to give as gifts.

To answer your question about sweetening, this recipe for jam suggests that for every cup of pitted cherry plums you should add ¾ cup of sugar and ¼ cup of water. During cooking, the volume will decrease almost by half. So if you want to end up with a pint of jam, start with 4 cups of plums. And here’s a description of how to make cherry plum jelly. Master forager Hank Shaw uses them to make Chinese plum sauce. And I could go on, but you know how to google.

Once you have a good idea of the tartness of your fruit, you can use it in recipes that call for regular plums and adjust the sugar or other sweeteners appropriately. Pies, tarts, crumbles, salsas, compotes, chutneys: Seems like there are any number of possibilities. Do something interesting with this fruit every year — while you can. Everything I read about these striking purple-leafed trees indicates that they are super vulnerable to pests and disease, don’t live long and can begin to deteriorate after as few as 10 years.

And now for the rest of us: If you’re not familiar with Fallingfruit.org, it’s worth a look. On this Web site, volunteers have posted nearly 800,000 locations worldwide where 1,221 types of edibles can be found on public property. (Among them are 36,731 locations of Prunus cerasifera.) The definition of “public property” might be a little broad: Someone has posted a mulberry tree that I drive by often, and it isn’t on public land. But I guess the mulberries will be when they fall onto the sidewalk. The site also warns that because plants die or are removed, its map might not always be accurate. But it’s a fun look, anyway.

The map shows about 21,000 locations in the District, and just a tiny handful in the surrounding areas. Looks like the suburbanites need to get to work!

Purple Pony Plum Tree

Home owners across the country have fallen in love with dwarf Purple Pony (Prunus cerasifera ‘Purple Pony’). This cute tree is a very dependable accent with abundant, shell pink flowers in the early spring.

The beautiful, single pale pink blooms are followed by the deep purple foliage. This foliage color does not fade, discolor, dull or go green. It stays glistening, vivid and dark red all through the heat of summer.

With smaller yards, the need for dwarf accent trees has never been greater. The ornamental value of the Purple Pony is outstanding. It stays small and has a wonderful shape in the landscape.

This tree stays nice and tidy, too. It features a compact, uniform canopy that won’t require much pruning to shape it. You can plant it and enjoy it, knowing it won’t give you trouble.

And Purple Pony Plum has been observed since 1962. It is considered sterile. Because it doesn’t produce fruit, it won’t mess up the yard, walkway, or driveway. It is a wonderful Flowering Plum that is non-fruiting tree.

The delightful characteristics of the Purple Pony Plum make it a must have for today’s landscape. This is a fine selection that will be enjoyed in the yard for many years to come. Order today!

How to Use Purple Pony Plum in the Landscape

With lot sizes shrinking, the dwarf Purple Pony Plum is the perfect tree to add a spot of brilliance throughout the yard with little extra effort. From the light pink blooms, to the gorgeous leaves all season, you can use this as a small anchor tree for garden beds.

With its attractive shape, it’s dressy enough for front yard plantings. Try this as a single specimen at the corner of your house, or plant one on either side of your front door.

You’ll love the look of a long, straight row of individual Purple Pony Plum trees lining a driveway. A hedge row would also work beautifully as a long backdrop along the back fence of a property. This is a beautiful way to add height to existing fence.

The uniform growth of the trees gives a consistent look in these applications. For individual trees, plant them 10 to 12 feet apart. You’ll measure from the trunk of one to the trunk of the next.

For a hedgerow, where the branches will grow together and touch, shorten the planting distance to 8 to 10 feet between each trunk.

You can leave the lower branches growing low on the trunk for a beautiful specimen or privacy screen. You’ll gain more blooms in spring and a gorgeous foliage display.

Or, limb up any low branches back to the trunk if you’d like to use it as a small shade tree. You’ll gain more room under the canopy. Just imagine you and a friend in a pair of comfy chairs and a pitcher of lemonade or cocktails. How fun!

A pretty tree like this can also be used to create walls of garden rooms.Carve out a special place for yourself in your yard.

Purple Pony Plum can be used in unlimited ways in the landscape. This is truly the ideal accent tree for the limited lots size of today’s average size urban properties.

#ProPlantTips for Care

While this tree tolerates a wide range of soil types, it does require good drainage. Where poor drainage is suspected, plant the Purple Pony on a mound or raised bed 12 to 18 inches above the soil line.

The Purple Pony shows good disease resistance, has a sterile flower (so it will not produce fruit) and has become very popular the colder zones of USDA 5 and 6.

Light pruning is best done in fall, winter or summer. You won’t want to miss any of the flowers, after all.

Plant it in full sun, or in partial sun where it will get afternoon shade. Give it regular watering to get it established in your yard. Once it’s become established, it can tolerate periodic drought.

People are searching for these beautiful young trees. If you see it in stock, please place your order today!

GardenersDream

Prunus cerasifera ‘Pissardii Nigra’ Tree

The Prunus cerasifera ‘Nigra’, or the Black Leaved Plum (Blood Plum) inspires with its dark red, glossy leaves and the dark brown-red bark. It grows into a large shrub or small tree of 5-7 meters in height with upright habit, forming around crown. As the blood plum grows older, it shows romantic overhanging. It produces numerous flowers and fruits, however, the ornamental value of the plant is higher than the value of the fruits.

The alternate and elliptical, deciduous leaves of Prunus Nigra shine with striking colours of dark reddish-brown to black-red. Its bark is reddish brown to blackish and shiny, sometimes it is thorny. The warm colours create beautiful contrasts, creating a beautiful spectacle in private gardens or in public parks. In March – April, bright pink flowers envelop the black leaved plum, followed by red fruits in Aug – Sep.

Prunus Pissardii Nigra has no special soil demands as any general garden soil is enough for the plant to thrive in. However, the tree prefers moderately dry to moist nutrient-rich soils and it grows best in a bright and warm location with plenty of direct sunlight.

A thorough pruning over the winter ensures that the Prunus Nigra branches strongly and forms a well-branched dense crown. It is a winter-hardy plant that thrives without difficulty.

It is often planted in gardens and parks due to its striking flowers, red foliage and sturdiness. Black leaved plum stands out in contrast with other green plants as a single specimen or even in groups. It also forms beautiful hedges where birds like to build their nests.

Prunus Pissardii Nigra Stock Photos and Images

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  • Detail of an ornamental flowering cherry plum (prunus pissardii nigra).
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Prunus cerasifera nigra.Black cherry plum hedge in blossom in front of a house in Deddington, Oxfordshire, England
  • Close-up, creative image of the delicate pink spring blossom of the Black Cherry Plum Tree also known as Prunus Cerasifera Nigra.
  • Urban Myrobalan Cherry plum (Prunus cerasifera) tree, Vauxhall, London SE1
  • Prunus cerasifera ‘Nigra’ – Blutpflaume – black cherry plum
  • Pink flowering Myrobalan Cherry plum (Prunus cerasifera ‘Nigra’) tree, London SE14
  • Spring floral concept. Full blooming of apricot tree. Beautiful flower on an abstract blurred background. Detailed closeup with soft selective focus.
  • White blossom of an urban Myrobalan Cherry plum (Prunus cerasifera ‘Pissardii’) tree, London
  • a blooming branch of purple-leaf plum
  • PRUNUS CERASIFERA PISSARDII NIGRA
  • Cherry blossom in early spring from spectacular flowering cherry plum Against deep blue sky
  • Early Spring Flowering Cherry Blossom
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra Flowering plum tree blossom
  • supported branches of a church plum in the spa park bad salzschlirf
  • Pink blossom, Prunus cerasifera pissardii nigra ‘Thunderbolt’.
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Prunus cerasifera ‘Nigra’ – Blutpflaume – black cherry plum
  • Spring floral concept. Full blooming of apricot tree. Beautiful flower on an abstract blurred background. Detailed closeup with soft selective focus.
  • PRUNUS CERASIFERA PISSARDII NIGRA
  • Early Spring Flowering Cherry Blossom
  • supported branches of a church plum in the spa park bad salzschlirf
  • Pink blossom, Prunus cerasifera pissardii nigra ‘Thunderbolt’.
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Spring floral concept. Full blooming of apricot tree. Beautiful flower on an abstract blurred background. Detailed closeup with soft selective focus.
  • Early Spring Flowering Cherry Blossom
  • Pink blossom, Prunus cerasifera pissardii nigra ‘Thunderbolt’.
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Spring floral concept. Full blooming of apricot tree. Beautiful flower on an abstract blurred background. Detailed closeup with soft selective focus.
  • Early Spring Flowering Cherry Blossom
  • Pink blossom, Prunus cerasifera pissardii nigra ‘Thunderbolt’.
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Spring floral concept. Full blooming of apricot tree. Beautiful flower on an abstract blurred background. Detailed closeup with soft selective focus.
  • Early Spring Flowering Cherry Blossom
  • Pink blossom, Prunus cerasifera pissardii nigra ‘Thunderbolt’.
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Spring floral concept. Full blooming of apricot tree. Beautiful flower on an abstract blurred background. Detailed closeup with soft selective focus.
  • Early Spring Flowering Cherry Blossom
  • Pink blossom, Prunus cerasifera pissardii nigra ‘Thunderbolt’.
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Spring floral concept. Full blooming of apricot tree. Beautiful flower on an abstract blurred background. Detailed closeup with soft selective focus.
  • Early Spring Flowering Cherry Blossom
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Early Spring Flowering Cherry Blossom
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Purple Cherry Plum
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Purple Cherry Plum
  • Prunus cerasifera Nigra, Redleaved Cherry Plum, Hedera helix, Ivy
  • Prunus cistena, Dwarf redleaf cherry plum
  • Dwarf redleaf cherryplum
  • Dwarf redleaf cherryplum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Redleaved cherry plum
  • Redleaved cherry plum
  • Redleaved cherry plum
  • Redleaved cherry plum
  • Redleaved cherry plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple leaf cherry plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum
  • Purple-leaf plum

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Search Results for Prunus Pissardii Nigra Stock Photos and Images

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Differences Between Cherry And Plum Tree

Many gardeners wonder how to tell plum and cherry trees apart. While the blossoms do look somewhat similar, the differences between cherry and plum trees are easy to spot once you are familiar with them. Read on for all you need to know about plum tree identification and cherry tree identification.

Differences between Cherry and Plum Trees

Both plum and cherry tree identification is not difficult when the trees are laden with fruit, but it is a little more subtle when their fruit is not yet present.

Plum tree vs. cherry tree leaves

You can tell many differences by looking at the leaves. The leaves of a cherry tree are green and unfold like a wallet. Contrast this with the plum tree leaves that are usually reddish purple. One thing to look for in plum tree identification is the darker leaves. However, a few varieties of plum trees have green leaves. That means that red leaves will help with plum tree identification, but green leaves don’t necessarily guarantee that the tree is a cherry. In most cases, ornamental (flowering varieties) plums will have the reddish colored leaves whereas the fruiting types are green.

If you are wondering how to tell plum and cherry trees apart definitively from the leaves, look at the leaf edges. In general, smoother edges mean cherry tree leaves, while toothed edges indicate that you are looking at a plum tree. That said, there are many cherries that have finely toothed leaf edges, making it difficult to know for certain without looking at other characteristics as well.

Plum tree vs. cherry tree – blossoms

Both plum trees and cherry trees are known for their frothy white, pink or red blossoms. From afar, the flowering trees look similar, but up close, cherry tree and plum tree identification is possible.

The shape of the flower buds will help you tell the difference. Plum trees have round buds, cherry tree buds are oval. If each bud is separately attached to the tree by a short thin stem, it’s a plum tree. If small clusters of blossoms grow from each flower bud, it’s a cherry tree.

Smell the flowers. One factor in plum tree identification is the fragrance. All plum flowers have a strong sweet fragrance. If the flowers don’t smell significant, it’s a cherry tree.

Look at the tip of the petals to see if each one has a small split at the very end. This is one fool-proof means of cherry tree identification. Cherry tree petals each have a small split and plum tree petals do not.

How to tell plum and cherry trees apart via trunk

One factor in cherry tree identification is the gray bark on the tree trunk. Look for broken horizontal lines on the cherry tree trunk called “Lenticels.”

Plum tree trunks are dark and the bark looks rough, not smooth. Plum tree bark does not have horizontal lines.

Classification

Common Name: Cherry Plum

Scientific Name: Prunus cerasifera

Family: Rosaceae

Identification

Figure 1 (blooming)

Figure 2 (not blooming)

Leaves: Its leaves are a solid green color with little fine hairs on the underside of the leaf. It is slender and has a glossy sheen to it on the upper side. They have an oval shape with little grooves on the edges. Their average size is about 3-7 cm (1.5-2.5 inches).

Figure 3

Figure 4

Twigs and Bark: The bark is a dark brown color. Its texture is very smooth and becomes crinkly as it matures. It is relatively thin and can be damaged easily from mechanical impact. The twigs are very thin and are also a brown color that contain the fruit and flowers. They are mostly grown upright and will not droop.

Figure 5

Figure 6

Flowers: The flowers of the cherry plum tree are very beautiful and have either a white or pale pink color. They contain five petals with many stamens. The flowers typically appear and bloom in the spring (late February or March). Their average size is about 2 cm (0.8 inches) across.

Figure 7

Figure 8

Fruits: The fruits are red or yellow color and are shaped like a cherry. They are edible and have a fairly sweet taste. Once pollinated by insects, the flowers of the cherry plum tree turn into the fruits (early July to mid-September) and grow abundantly throughout the tree. Each fruit contains one seed. Their average size is about 2-3 cm (0.8-1.2 inches) in diameter.

Figure 9

Figure 10

Where It’s From

Native Range: The cherry plum tree is native to southeastern Europe (i.e Albania, Bulgaria, Greece, and Yugoslavia), western Asia (i.e Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, southern Russia, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan), western China, and Pakistan. There are also many scattered in locations of North America. The cherry plum tree is widely naturalized in Southern Australia (i.e naturalized in eastern New South Wales, in the ACT, Victoria, south-eastern and eastern South Australia, and the coastal districts of south-western Western Australia). It is also naturalized in Europe, tropical Asia, New Zealand and the USA.

Figure 11. Black areas represent where the cherry plum tree is found in the U.K

Figure 12. Shaded area represents potential planting range of cherry plum tree in the U.S

Ecological Notes

The cherry plum tree has a short average lifespan of about 20 years. It grows well in average, medium moisture, in full sun to part shade. It is also drought tolerant and needs well-drained moist, acidic soils. The best time the cherry plum tree begins flowering is when it is exposed to full sun. It is susceptible to diseases such as cankers, galls, and mildew. Possible pests that may attack the cherry plum tree are tent caterpillars, scale, aphids, tent, Japanese beetles, and clearwing borers, more specifically peach tree borers. However, these pests don’t do that much damage to the tree. Another pest, spider mites, may appear during prolonged drought periods. The fruits of the cherry plum tree are also an important part. Although it can be tasty, it can have a bitter taste. It has been said that it can cause health issues if a large amount is consumed.

What We Use It For

The cherry plum tree can be used for many resources. One example is that it can be used for medicinal purposes. The flowers are used in Bach flower remedies and are used to help regain one’s control over one’s thoughts and actions. It contains certain substances that break down in water to form hydrocyanic acid. This helps stimulates the body’s respiration, improves digestion, and overall improves the body’s health. The cherry plum tree is considered a popular ornamental landscape tree due to its unique color that grows throughout the season, that can be placed out on the deck or patio. However, it is advised that the tree is best used in a large-scale landscape as a single specimen, rather than in rows or mass planting. Another example is for food. The cherry plum trees’ fruits are edible and contain a good source of nutrition value that have potassium, calcium, phosphate, vitamin B and C, that are great for the body’s metabolism and nervous system. It can also be cooked and used for delicious pies, jams, tarts, etc. Last but not least, the cherry plum tree can also be used for coloring dye from the leaves and fruits.

Biographer

Alyssa Lee ‘21, BIOL 238: Evolution, Ecology, & Behavior, Spring 2019

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Zillah and I were up in London the past few days visiting family and friends and doing a bit of ‘business’, talking and meeting people who are at the cutting edge of community healthcare using food and plants for healing.

While wandering around on the top of Putney Common looking out for wild edibles, we chanced upon a wonderfully abundant Cherry Plum tree. Literally dripping with fruit.

Out came my trusty bag, and I made my way through the undergrowth to the base of the tree.

Not being that much of a youngster, well physically at least, I looked up with Doe like eyes, and saw the harvest above me, just begging to be picked. Yet people had obviously just walked on by, not even noticing the bounty right next to them.

Usually I would have laid a sheet underneath the tree and shaken the branches to release the fruit. Instead I had to negotiate climbing a six foot metal fence, and perch precariously on a single horizontal iron bar on top.

I barely had to touch the fruit to release it, and within 5 minutes had harvested around 2lbs of edible Cherry Plums. The tree continues to be laden with fruit.

After scrambling back down the fence, I realised just how flexible foraging has made my 45 year old body, and all without really working at it. Regular foraging has given back to me some of the flexibility I had when I was a lot younger. And I am deeply grateful for the many health benefits that foraging has bestowed upon me. The health benefits go way beyond ‘just filling the belly’.

The taste of Cherry Plum is a mixture of cherries and plums, hence the name. However I would say that they have a similar texture and sweetness to greengages.

Cherry Plum is not strictly a wild edible, because it was cultivated for its fruit before humans discovered other more rewarding fruit trees. Yet it is an overlooked fruit tree that is worthy of your attention. You will often find it being grown in suburban gardens for its ability to shield properties from the general public and because of its decorative foliage.

I love eating my fruits raw, but if you are a ‘jam monster’ try this delicious cherry plum jam recipe.

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