Blue Cornflower in bloom

Blue Cornflower in bloom

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Blue Cornflower flowers

Blue Cornflower flowers

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 24 inches

Spread: 3 feet

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 3a

Other Names: Mountain Bluet, Perennial Bachelor’s Button

Description:

Deep green foliage makes a striking contrast with the curiously fringed violet-blue flowers; avoid wet winter soil; adaptable to most sites and stunning when massed; loved by butterflies

Ornamental Features

Blue Cornflower features unusual blue lacecap flowers with violet centers at the ends of the stems from early summer to mid fall. The flowers are excellent for cutting. Its attractive narrow leaves remain green in colour throughout the season. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes

Blue Cornflower is an herbaceous perennial with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its medium texture blends into the garden, but can always be balanced by a couple of finer or coarser plants for an effective composition.

This plant will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and is best cleaned up in early spring before it resumes active growth for the season. It is a good choice for attracting butterflies to your yard. Gardeners should be aware of the following characteristic(s) that may warrant special consideration;

  • Disease

Blue Cornflower is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Container Planting

Planting & Growing

Blue Cornflower will grow to be about 24 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 3 feet. It grows at a fast rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 15 years.

This plant should only be grown in full sunlight. It is very adaptable to both dry and moist locations, and should do just fine under typical garden conditions. It is considered to be drought-tolerant, and thus makes an ideal choice for a low-water garden or xeriscape application. It is not particular as to soil pH, but grows best in poor soils. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This is a selected variety of a species not originally from North America. It can be propagated by division; however, as a cultivated variety, be aware that it may be subject to certain restrictions or prohibitions on propagation.

Blue Cornflower is a fine choice for the garden, but it is also a good selection for planting in outdoor pots and containers. With its upright habit of growth, it is best suited for use as a ‘thriller’ in the ‘spiller-thriller-filler’ container combination; plant it near the center of the pot, surrounded by smaller plants and those that spill over the edges. Note that when growing plants in outdoor containers and baskets, they may require more frequent waterings than they would in the yard or garden. Be aware that in our climate, most plants cannot be expected to survive the winter if left in containers outdoors, and this plant is no exception. Contact our store for more information on how to protect it over the winter months.

Flower:

Showy flower heads 2 inches across, single or a few at the top of the stem. Each head consists of set of 10 to 20, blue to violet ray flowers around the outer edge and numerous, shorter purple disk flowers in the center. Ray flowers are sterile, widely spreading, narrowly tubular with 5 slender lobes as long as or longer than the tube. Disk flowers are fertile, erect to ascending, with a column of dark blue-violet tipped stamens and a divided style.

The bracts (phyllaries) surrounding the base of the flower are in several layers, appressed, triangular to egg-shaped, light green with blackish, finely toothed edging. The entire set of phyllaries (involucre) is ¾ to 1 inch long and longer than wide.

Leaves and stems:

Leaves are alternate, green, lance-elliptic, 4 to 12 inches long, toothless or with a few small teeth, rarely lobed. The upper surface is sparsely short hairy, the lower more woolly hairy.

Leaves are stalkless but the leaf base extends down the stem, creating a wing. Stems are erect, single or multiple from the base, hairy and usually unbranched, sometimes few-branched. Colonies may be formed from creeping rhizomes or stolons.

Fruit:

Seeds are elliptic, creamy colored to brown, smooth, 5 to 6 mm long with a tuft of short, light brown hairs at the tip.

Notes:

Perennial Cornflower is a European species popular in the garden trade, and occasionally escapes cultivation. It’s certainly a pretty thing, and not likely to be confused with any other species except other garden variety Centaura species. Our chance encounter was in Grand Portage, on a roadside mixed with non-native Hawkweeds and other weeds. We feel this should be eradicated wherever encountered before it gets a chance to further proliferate in the wild. The north shore of Lake Superior is a hotbed for such things and the risk is high for a rhizomatous species that likes gravelly soil to settle in and further degrade this fragile habitat. Perennial Cornflower’s native habitat is mountain meadows so is quite at home in cool, rocky places like the north shore. It can be quite vigorous and spreads by seeds as well as vegetatively—a double whammy. Let’s not give this one a chance to make its mark.

Centaurea montana seeds – (Mountain Bluet, Blue Perennial Cornflower)

Description

This plant forms a bushy mound of greyish – green leaves. It is a medium growing plant which likes a sunny position. It bears large showy, deeply fringed, violet blue flowers in early summer. It will bloom again for you in autumn if you cut it back after its first flowering

This plant is very hardy, and will grow in most types of soils and climate regions. It may self-seed , so if you don’t want them, weed them out as you see them. You can prune the plant back hard in mid-summer to maintain a compact habit. Centaurea Montana makes a good cut flower.

Sowing advice

Sow spring and early summer , late summer and early autumn
Sow in seed trays or pots in seed raising mix. Moisten the mix and let it drain.
Cover the seeds with a 1cm layer of soil as centaureas need darkness to germinate.
Cover the containers with clear plastic to keep the mix moist while the seeds are germinating and place in a warm location 16 to 22°C . Germination takes 3 to 4 weeks.
When the seedlings germinate, remove the plastic covers and place in a sunny spot. Keep the soil moist but not soggy.
When seedlings are about 5cm high and have at least one pair of true leaves, transplant to individual pots to grow on. Transplant when large enough to a sunny or partially shaded spot in the garden- allow 60cm space between plants, and water well.

I remember the cornflower garden in the street where I lived as a student. Among the bare, terraced houses, someone had sown a 3m x 2m drift of them. It was an oasis, a flash of cobalt blue that caught your eye from far off down the street. Everybody who passed would stop to stare at its unfussy beauty and very blue blue.

Cornflowers (Centaurea cyanus) are a UK native and once grew vigorously through our corn crops, patching the countryside with blue fields. But when farmers began using herbicides, they started to disappear and today are rare in the wild. They flourish instead in gardens.

They are the most splendid of annuals. Aside from their electric blue, which is breathtaking when they’re grown in dense drifts, they are easy to grow, they flower all summer, they make great cut flowers, butterflies and bees adore them, and because you grow them from seed, they’re cheap.

The other advantage is that they’re a hardy annual, which means they can be sown very early in the spring or, 10 times better, now. Set off sometime in the next couple of weeks, the seedlings have time to establish before frost sets in. They will develop strong roots during the cool months, allowing them to form bigger plants – spring-sown cornflowers will reach up to 90cm, but autumn-sown plants grow to 1-1.5m and flower six weeks earlier.

They require a sunny, open spot and poor soil. When we think of cornflowers, we imagine running through vast fields of them, but you don’t need a huge area to grow them: in fact, I’ve grown them in containers many times.

How to grow

You could mix cornflowers with other annuals, such as poppies, or sow them on their own. I like them mixed with hardy annual grasses (Thompson & Morgan does a great hardy annual grass seed mix). There are various cornflower hybrids in white, pink and red, but they never look quite right. The only non-blue variety worth growing is C. cyanus ‘Black Ball’, a deep burgundy cornflower that looks good with grasses.

Dig the soil, don’t add fertiliser, weed and rake it over, removing any stones that might get in the way of the seedlings. If you’re not sure what the seedlings look like, you may want to sow in lines to distinguish. In this case, with the edge of a handfork make grooves 6mm deep and 35cm apart, and place the seeds along each groove at 35cm intervals. Then run your hand over the area, so the sides of the groove fall in over the seeds. Alternatively, scatter the seed and rake it in.

Give the area a good drink. When the seedlings appear two to four weeks later, thin them out – each seedling needs 35cm of space around it. One advantage of sowing hardy annuals now is you won’t have to water as much as you would in spring. But if it doesn’t rain, keep the soil moist until they’re established. The plants will need support or they’ll look very drunk come June. Insert 1m hazel sticks around the planted area and lower two layers of mesh netting over them. They will grow through it and stand straight.

Cornflowers germinated at this time of year in the wild, so they should overwinter well. However, if we have a particularly cold winter, some may perish. If you’re concerned about this, start them off in a greenhouse or buy them as plug plants in spring.

Just like sweet peas, cornflowers need to be cut constantly if you want them to flower all summer. Cut them just before they open fully – the centre of the flower should still be dipped inwards slightly.

Many people associate meadow planting with cornflowers, but in fact cornfield annuals such as cornflower and corn poppy last only one year in a permanent meadow. This is because they can exist only where soil is disturbed, which is why they grow in ploughed fields.

You can sow a wonderful annual meadow from scratch each year, either now or in early spring. It’s easy to do and can be any size and any mix of hardy annuals. Mine is always simple: grasses and lots of cornflowers. Come May, I’ll be gazing over a sea of blue.

Supplier: Cornflower seed and plugs are available by mail order from The Wild Flower Shop.

Seed offer

Order five packets of cornflower seed (two each of ‘Dwarf Blue Midget’ and blue ‘Jubilee Gem’, one of ‘Black Ball’) for £7.99, or 10 packets (four each of Dwarf Blue Midget and Jubilee Gem, two of Black Ball) for £10.98. To order, call 0844 573 2020, quoting ref GUA551). Delivery within 28 days.

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Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)

Cornflowers are extremely colourful hardy annuals. They look great in beds and borders, especially when part of an annual bedding display or a cottage garden, flowering from late spring and summer into autumn.

Cornflowers are also commonly known as ‘bachelor’s buttons’ – and more than a dozen other common names. They make excellent cut flowers and attract bees and butterflies and other pollinating and beneficial insects.

Although blue is the most common colour; white, red, pink and purple varieties are also available.

How to grow cornflowers

Cultivation

Cornflowers grow and flower best in sunny positions. They need a fertile soil enriched with lots of organic matter, which holds plenty of moisture in spring and summer, doesn’t dry out or become waterlogged.

Cornflower varieties

  • Black Ball Rich chocolate shade, that look almost black.
  • Blue Diadem Large, deep blue double flowers.
  • Classic Fantastic Various shades of blue, with frosted white edges.
  • Jubilee Gem Large, deep blue double flowers.
  • Polka Dot Mix Shorter plants with flowers in a range of colours – white, pinks, blues and reds.

Sowing cornflowers

Sow seeds from March to May outdoors for flowers from June to September, or sow during August and September to flower slightly earlier the following year.

Sow seeds thinly in finely raked, moist soil where you want the plants to flower, at a depth of 13mm (½in) covering the seeds lightly with soil. Water the soil during dry periods.

Thin the seedlings in stages to 15-23cm (6-9in) apart when they’re large enough to handle.

Planting cornflowers

You can buy young plants from garden centres, nurseries or mail order suppliers for planting in spring.

Dig over the planting area, incorporating lots of organic matter – such as compost or planting compost, especially if the soil is heavy clay or light, well-drained sandy soil. Dig a good sized hole big enough to easily accommodate the rootball.

Place the rootball in the planting hole and adjust the planting depth so that the crown of leaves is at soil level. Mix in more organic matter with the excavated soil and fill in the planting hole. Apply a general granular plant food over the soil around the plants and water in well.

Suggested planting locations and garden types

Flower borders and beds, patios, containers, city and courtyard gardens, cottage and informal gardens, cut flower garden.

How to care for cornflowers

Water plants whenever necessary to keep the soil or compost moist during spring and summer, as this will prolong flowering.

Remove any competing weeds while the plants are young and establishing.

Applying a balanced liquid plant food every couple of weeks in the growing season will also encourage more, bigger and better flowers.

Deadhead plants regularly to prolong their flowering period well into autumn.

Cornflowers are generally pest free.

Flowering season(s)

Spring, Summer, Autumn

Foliage season(s)

Spring, Summer, Autumn

Sunlight

Full sun

Soil type

Chalky, Clay, Loamy, Sandy

Soil pH

Neutral

Soil moisture

Moist but well-drained

Ultimate height

Up to 75cm (30in)

Ultimate spread

Up to 30cm (12in)

Time to ultimate height

3-4 months

Bluebottle Flower Stock Photos and Images

(2,290) Narrow your search: Vectors | Black & white | Page 1 of 23

  • developed blue cornflower on green cereal’s background
  • Cornflower, Bachelor’s button, Bluebottle, Boutonniere flower, Hurtsickle, Cyani flower Centaurea cyanus
  • Colourful flower meadow, bee pasture with cornflowers (Centaurea cyanus)
  • Cornflower, close-up, macro
  • Germany, Bluebottle flower, close up
  • CENTAUREA CYANUS ‘BLUE BALL’ (COMMON NAMES, CORNFLOWER OR BLUEBOTTLE FLOWER)
  • A graphium sarpedon, commonly known as the Common Bluebottle or Blue Triangle butterfly, feeding on an orange flower
  • Scenic moment. Flower ix of fieldflowers. A twoseater garden bench in the middle. .
  • Three cornflowers in a grain field
  • bluebottle butterfly feeds from flowering vines along a fence in central Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.
  • Blooming cornflower on a green background. Centaurea cyanus. Decorative close-up of beautiful blue wild flower in blurred green field.
  • Blue cornflower in a garden, uper view
  • Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)
  • Blue cornflowers
  • Bule wild flower – Centaurea cyanus – bluebottle, cornflower
  • Fly of the dead, Bluebottle Blow Fly (Cynomyia mortuorum, Cynomya hirta), on lilac flower, Germany
  • Cornflower or Bluebottle (centaurea cyanus), close up of a solitary flower.
  • Bluebottle (Centaurea cyans), Cornflower
  • Greeting card with gentle bluebottle bouquet in green vase
  • blue single cornflower on green cereal’s background
  • Blue cornflower (Cyanus segetum) isolated on white background
  • Blue Cornflower or Bluebottle Centaurea cyanus
  • Closeup macro photo of butterfly Common Bluebottle (Graphium sarpedon) on flower blossom, low depth of focus
  • Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus) in flower
  • Corn flower
  • Bluebottle on yellow Dahlia.
  • Cornflower, Centaurea cyanus, an edible flower
  • bluebottle butterfly feeds from flowering vines along a fence in central Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.
  • Insect macro of a fly on a red flower blossom
  • Blue cornflower in garden
  • Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)
  • Bright cornflower, knapweed, bluebottle, bachelors button, bluet, centaury on green yellow background of blurred grass with bokeh.
  • Bule wild flower and ears of wheat (ray) – Centaurea cyanus – bluebottle, cornflower
  • FIELD OF WILD FLOWERS
  • Cornflower or Bluebottle (centaurea cyanus), close up of a solitary flower against a plain green background.
  • Violet flower of cornflower, lat. Centaurea, isolated on white background
  • blooming flower meadow in a garden in summer, Germany, Bavaria
  • group of blue cornflower on green cereal’s background
  • Blue and pink Cornflowers isolated on white
  • Blue Cornflower or Bluebottle Centaurea cyanus
  • Closeup macro photo of butterfly Common Bluebottle (Graphium sarpedon) on flower blossom, low depth of focus
  • Blue Cornflower Flower isolated on white background with shallow depth of field.
  • Corn Flower (Centaurea cyanus)
  • Flower meadow in France, Indre (36) with cornflower (Centaurea cyanus), garden cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus), Sulfur Cosmos…
  • Cornflowers With Forest In The Background, Jelenia Gora, Poland
  • bluebottle butterfly feeds from flowering vines along a fence in central Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.
  • Blue cornflower isolated on white background macro. Set or collection
  • ‘Dwarf Pouce’ Bachelor’s Buttons, Blåklint (Centaurea cyanus)
  • Vertical card with bluebottles on the white background
  • Common Bluebottle Butterfly hanging upside down from a pink Bougainvillea flower – Graphium Sarpedon
  • Bule wild flower and ears of wheat (ray) – Centaurea cyanus – bluebottle, cornflower
  • FIELD OF WILD FLOWERS
  • Cornflower (centaurea cyanus), close up of a solitary flower against a plain green background. Also known as Bluebottle.
  • Violet flower of cornflower, lat. Centaurea, isolated on white background
  • bachelor’s button, bluebottle, cornflower (Centaurea cyanus), blooming at a field border, Germany
  • Blow fly (Calliphoridae) on flower
  • Pink cornflower (Cyanus segetum) isolated on white background
  • Blue Cornflower or Bluebottle Centaurea cyanus
  • Cornflowers
  • Mix of fieldflowers around a twoseater garden bench.
  • Corn Flower (Centaurea cyanus)
  • Flower meadow in France, Indre (36) with cornflower (Centaurea cyanus), garden cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus), Sulfur Cosmos…
  • Kornblume von oben fotografiert.
  • bluebottle butterfly feeds from flowering vines along a fence in central Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.
  • Blue cornflower isolated on white background macro. Set or collection
  • ‘Dwarf Pouce’ Bachelor’s Buttons, Blåklint (Centaurea cyanus)
  • Cornflower
  • Common Bluebottle Butterfly flying towards a pink Bougainvillea flower – Graphium Sarpedon
  • Cornflower – Bluebottle – Hurtsickle (Centaurea cyanus) flowering in summer
  • FIELD OF WILD FLOWERS
  • Cornflower (centaurea cyanus), also known as Bluebottle, close up of a solitary flower showing detail.
  • Bluebottle, Cornflower
  • bachelor’s button, bluebottle, cornflower (Centaurea cyanus), inflorescence, Germany
  • Blow fly (Calliphoridae) on flower
  • Green bluebottle fly warming up in the spring sunshine on a large leaf
  • Blue Cornflower or Bluebottle Centaurea cyanus
  • Cornflower
  • Perennial cornflower, Centaurea montana, in flower. Alps.
  • Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus), flower, Baden-Wuerttemberg
  • Flower meadow in France, Indre (36) with cornflower (Centaurea cyanus), garden cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus), Sulfur Cosmos…
  • Kornblume von oben fotografiert.
  • bluebottle butterfly feeds from flowering vines along a fence in central Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.
  • Blue cornflower isolated on white background with copy space for your text. Top view. Flat lay pattern
  • Great blue-bottle, Bergklint (Centaurea montana)
  • Common bluebottle fly (Calliphora vicina) feeding on a Forsythia flower, Wiltshire garden, UK, March.
  • Common Bluebottle Butterfly flying towards a pink Bougainvillea flower – Graphium Sarpedon
  • cornflower closeup macro, wheat background
  • FIELD OF WILD FLOWERS
  • Cornflower (centaurea cyanus), also known as Bluebottle, close up of a solitary flower against a plain green background.
  • Macro of a fly sitting on a blossom
  • flower meadow with oxeye daisy, poppy and cornflower, Netherlands, Texel
  • Bouquet of blue cornflowers at farmer’s market
  • Cornflower Centaurea scabiosa or greater knapweed wild blue flowers in sunlight. Floral background. Summer or spring concept.
  • Blue Cornflower or Bluebottle Centaurea cyanus
  • Pink Cornflower – Rosa Kornblume

Recent searches:

Search Results for Bluebottle Flower Stock Photos and Images

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Kolshitsky & the first Blue Bottle

The apocryphal tale goes like this: In the late 1600s, the Turkish army swept across much of Eastern and Central Europe, arriving at Vienna in 1683. Besieged and desperate, the Viennese needed an emissary who could cross Turkish lines to get a message to nearby Polish troops. Franz George Kolshitsky, who spoke Turkish and Arabic, took on the assignment disguised in Turkish uniform. After many perilous close calls, Kolshitsky completed his valiant deed, delivering news of the Poles’ imminent rescue to Vienna.

On September 13, the Turks were repelled from the city, leaving everything they brought, including strange bags of beans, which were thought to be camel feed. Kolshitsky, having lived in the Arab world for several years, knew these to be bags of coffee. Using money bestowed on him by the mayor of Vienna, Kolshitsky bought the coffee and opened Central Europe’s first-ever coffee house (The Blue Bottle), bringing coffee to a grateful Vienna.

319 years later

In the early 2000s, in Oakland, California, a slightly disaffected freelance musician and coffee lunatic, weary of the commercial coffee enterprise and stale, overly roasted beans, decided to open a roaster for people who were clamoring for the actual taste of fresh coffee. Using a minuscule six-pound batch roaster, he made a historic vow: “I will only sell coffee less than 48 hours out of the roaster to my guests, so they may enjoy coffee at peak flavor. I will only use the finest, most delicious, and responsibly sourced beans.”

In honor of Kolshitsky’s heroics, he named his business Blue Bottle Coffee and began another chapter in the history of superlative coffee.

Now, more than fifteen years later, and thanks to the enthusiastic support of many loyal guests, Blue Bottle Coffee has grown to a network of cafes across the U.S., Japan, and Korea. We are still united by the simple purpose of getting great coffee to everyone who asks for it. We have gotten even more specific about freshness and peak flavor. Improbably and delightfully, there are hundreds of us now.

We look forward to seeing you soon.

May we bring you coffee?

The first method of selling coffee we tried was enjoyable but short-lived:

We would call our customers, have a conversation about what kind of coffee they liked, and how much they tended to drink, and, if it was a good conversation, we would take their credit card number and make them a promise: to drive to their homes once a week and drop coffee on their doorstep.

This turned out to be a fraught business model for a number of reasons—and besides, there is only so much coffee you can pack into your Peugeot 505 wagon—but it is still, more or less, what we are trying to do.

We work directly with farmers around the world to source the most delicious and sustainable coffees we can find. Then, we roast them to our exacting flavor standards, and serve them to you at peak deliciousness, hopefully alongside a good conversation and some friendly advice. We think it’s a privilege to deliver the coffees we love, by farmers we admire, into your hands or onto your doorstep.

Who are our people?

Our people are the kindest, most hardworking and talented in the business. We’re an impossibly eclectic group of coffee experts, artists, writers, sensory scientists, bakers, designers, and all-around dreamers. Join us.

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