Dahlia Bulbs (Dinnerplate) – Cafe au Lait Pre-Sale Now; Ships Spring 2020

Dahlia Bulbs (tubers) are available in many catching colors and exotic shapes to give you a spectacular show of color in borders, beds or even containers. They have long been a favorite with gardeners as they are hardy and low maintenance. Dahlias will yield beautiful blooms from mid-summer through fall.

When to Plant your Dahlia Bulbs:

Unlike other bulbs such as Tulips, Dahlias like warm soils so plant Dahlia bulbs during the warmer and longer days of spring. Dahlias are usually planted about the same time you would plant your vegetable patch. Dahlia bulbs can be planted as late as mid-June in most parts of the country.

Where to Plant you Dahlia Bulbs:

Dahlia is an accommodating plant – it will grow almost anywhere! Dahlias will thrive in full sun but can tolerate some partial shade – the more sun, the bigger the flowers. Try to select a location that receives at least 6 hours of sun, sheltered from the wind and with, and this is vital, good drainage.

How to Plant your Dahlia Bulbs:

Dig a hole twice as deep and wide as the Dahlia bulb. Put the tuber in the hole with the “eye” on the tuber facing up. The eye is the point on the shoulder, or crown, of the tuber from which the plant grows. If you are planting a number of dahlias in the same location, they should be separated by about 2 feet to give each plant room to grow. The shorter varieties can be planted closer together. Plan for the rows to be 3 to 5 feet apart depending on the size of the plant. Fill in with soil to just cover the top of the bulb. As you begin to see new growth appear, cover again with soil. Covering the stem gradually will allow the stem to strengthen so it can support the flowers. Unless it is a very dry spring, it is not be necessary to water at the time of planting. The tubers will begin growing with the warmth and moisture in the soil. It is vital that they form a root system early in their planted life to assure a strong and healthy plant. Watering at the time of planting may encourage rot but as soon as your Dahlias are growing above the ground, water deeply to encourage strong roots.

How to Care for your Dahlia Bulbs:

Young dahlia plants do not need a lot of water; in fact, excessive water can lead to rotting of the plant. For larger plants, a good rule of thumb is to water if the rainfall is less than one inch in seven days. Pots require more regular watering. As the plant grows, remove any broken or damaged foliage. Good air circulation, especially near the ground is needed by the plants to prevent powdery mildew. Once the plants are several feet high the lower leaves can be removed to increase air circulation. Your dahlias will continue to bloom prolifically right up until frost. A heavy frost will kill the plant so you may want to dig the half a dozen or more tubers the plant has produced. Those tubers can then be stored and grown next spring!

Cafe Au Lait Dinner Plate Dahlia

Why Gardeners love Dahlias (See combination photo below.) Dahlias are one of the most rewarding summer flowers of all. They’re really easy to grow and make excellent cutting flowers.

Dahlias for today’s gardeners offer a really big gardening treat.

The ‘bulbs’ are actually tubers, and look a lot like peony roots–sort of like a bunch of carrots. The plants grow quickly and some grow quite tall, always with lush deep green foliage.

Types of Dahlias These plants have been hybridized into various heights from short bedding plants to tall bushy ones. But they are officially categorized by flower type or shape. The term, ‘Dinnerplate Dahlia’ is probably the most famous description, and though all gardeners use the term, it is not an official classification. ‘Dinnerplates’ are, simply put, the large plants with the huge flowers. The always-double flowers are up to 8″, sometimes a whopping 10″ across, so the name makes sense.

Here are the official classifications:

‘Decorative Dahlias’ This group includes the Dinnerplates and also other taller (to 4 ft.) plants with double, chrysanthemum-like flowers. The famous ‘Shogun Dahlias’ are as tall as Decoratives, but have very heavy bloom of smaller bi-colored flowers for gardeners who want a large bushy plant covered with color.

‘Cactus Dahlias’ are the ones with the cactus-like blooms, often in super-bright bicolors, always with the rolled, pointed petals. Like other groups, Cactus Dahlias can be of various heights, as long as they have ‘cactus’ flowers.

‘Gallery Dahlias’ are a newer group of shorter plants with flower-types of the Decoratives and Cactus groups. The Gallery group is named with terms from the art world including famous artists’ names.

‘Butterfly’ or ‘Impression Dahlias’ are what the Dutch call ‘bedding dahlias.’ They stay short, and are perfect for pots or borders. The names in this group all begin with ‘F’ like ‘Futuro’ and ‘Fantastico’. The flowers are wide-open and daisy-like for a really colorful display of their brilliant hues. If well cared-for, watered, and dead-headed, they bloom constantly all season, making great masses of color.

There are other groups such as ‘Ball Dahlias’ and ‘Pom Pom Dahlias’ with spherical blooms, ‘Colarette Dahlias’ with uneven rows of petals creating a ‘collar’ effect–the varieties go on and on. Growing all of them is essentially the same, and best of all, it’s easy.

Growing Dahlias: All the gardener needs to do is plant the tubers after spring frosts in good garden soil with full sun. It’s best to position them against a wall or be ready to stake them, since they are brittle, and must be protected from high winds. (If you’ve grown perennial Delphiniums, the plant size and growth is similar, but success with Dahlias is much easier.) Keep them free of bugs, well-watered, and well-fertilized as they grow, and your dahlias will begin to set buds by midsummer and be in full bloom, usually during July or August. Then the huge flowers keep coming until frost.

When frost threatens, just pull the roots up, cut off the stems, and store the tubers until the following spring. Each fall, you’ll be amazed how the ‘bulbs’ have multiplied during the summer, giving you more and more to divide and enjoy the next year.

One expert has said, ‘Never have so many gardeners received so much for so little work, as when they grow dahlias.’

More Information

Associated SKUs

AM018379
AM003416 (Bag of 3)
AM018349 (Bag of 15)

Common Name

Café Au Lait Dinner Plate Dahlia

Botanical Name

Dinner Plate Dahlia Café Au Lait

Flower Color

Pink

Flower Size

6-10″ flowers

Foliage

Serrated oval-shaped green foliage.

Light Requirements

Full Sun

Bloom Time

Summer until frost

Mature Height

36-48″ tall

Bulb Spacing

1 bulb / tuber per sq. ft.

Planting Depth

Bulbs/Tubers should be planted 1-2″ below the soil line.

Soil Type

Sandy Soil, Loamy Soil, Acidic Soil

Soil Moisture

Average, Well Draining

Advantages

Easy To Grow, Attract Butterflies, Attract Hummingbirds, Good For Cut Flowers, Good For Containers

Additional Information

Perennial in zones 8-10. Annual in zones 3-7.

Zones

3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Ships As

Bulb, Rhizome, Tuber

Poisonous or Toxic to Animals

Tubers and leaves are toxic if eaten in large amounts. Toxic to dog, cats and horses.

Neonicotinoid Free

Yes – Learn More

Planting Time

Spring / Summer

Ships to Hawaii, Alaska & Canada

No

Dahlia, Café au Lait

Dahlia may be grown from seed sown early indoors and transplanted outside after frost, or sown directly in the garden after frost, or grown from potted plants or tubers.

Sowing Seed Indoors:

  • Sow indoors 8 weeks before last frost using a seed starting kit.
  • Sow seeds ¼ inch deep in seed starting soil
  • Keep the soil moist at 70-75 degrees
  • Seedlings emerge in 14-20 days
  • As soon as seedlings emerge, provide plenty of light on a sunny windowsill or grow seedlings 3-4 inches beneath fluorescent plant lights turned on 16 hours per day, off for 8 hours at night. Raise the lights as the plants grow taller. Incandescent bulbs will not work for this process because they will get too hot. Most plants require a dark period to grow, do not leave lights on for 24 hours.
  • Thin to one seedling per cell when they have two sets of leaves.
  • Seedlings do not need much fertilizer, feed when they are 3-4 weeks old using a starter solution (half strength of a complete indoor houseplant food) according to manufacturer’s directions.
  • Transplant hardened-off seedlings to the garden after the frost.
  • Before planting in the garden, seedling plants need to be “hardened off”. Accustom young plants to outdoor conditions by moving them to a sheltered place outside for a week. Be sure to protect them from wind and hot sun at first. If frost threatens at night, cover or bring containers indoors, then take them out again in the morning. This hardening off process toughens the plant’s cell structure and reduces transplant shock and scalding.

Sowing Directly in the Garden:

  • Direct sow after danger of frost has passed.
  • Select a location in full sun with good rich moist organic soil. The more sun dahlias receive, the more flowers you will get. In hot climates, a bit of shade during the hottest part of the day will protect plants from heat, however.
  • Prepare the bed by turning the soil under to a depth of 8 inches. Level with a rake to remove clumps of grass and stones.
  • Most plants respond well to soils amended with organic matter. Compost is a wonderful form of organic matter with a good balance of nutrients and an ideal pH level, it can be added to your planting area at any time. If compost is not available, top dress the soil after planting with 1-2 inches of organic mulch, which will begin to breakdown into compost. After the growing season, a soil test will indicate what soil amendments are needed for the following season.
  • Sow seed ¼ inch deep.
  • Firm soil lightly, water and keep evenly moist.
  • Seedlings emerge in 14-20 days.
  • Thin plants to 18-30 inches apart, depending on the variety, when seedlings are 1 inch high.

Planting Dahlia Tubers

  • Plant tubers when you receive them in spring.
  • Select a location in full sun with good rich moist organic soil. The more sun dahlias receive, the more flowers you will get. In hot climates, a bit of shade during the hottest part of the day will protect plants from heat, however.
  • Prepare the bed by turning the soil under to a depth of 8 inches. Level with a rake to remove clumps of grass and stones.
  • Most plants respond well to soils amended with organic matter. Compost is a wonderful form of organic matter with a good balance of nutrients and an ideal pH level, it can be added to your planting area at any time. If compost is not available, top dress the soil after planting with 1-2 inches of organic mulch, which will begin to breakdown into compost. After the growing season, a soil test will indicate what soil amendments are needed for the following season.
  • Dig a hole six inches deep and wide enough to accommodate the tuber. Place the whole dahlia on its side (do not cut up dahlia tubers).
  • Cover with 2 inches of soil. As the plant grows fill in the hole until it is even with the rest of the garden.
  • For larger varieties inset the stake you will use to support them the same time you plant the tuber to avoid damaging the roots.

Planting Potted Plants:

  • Select a location in full sun with good rich moist organic soil. The more sun dahlias receive, the more flowers you will get. In hot climates, a bit of shade during the hottest part of the day will protect plants from heat, however.
  • Prepare the bed by turning the soil under to a depth of 8 inches. Level with a rake to remove clumps of grass and stones.
  • Most plants respond well to soils amended with organic matter. Compost is a wonderful form of organic matter with a good balance of nutrients and an ideal pH level, it can be added to your planting area at any time. If compost is not available, top dress the soil after planting with 1-2 inches of organic mulch, which will begin to breakdown into compost. After the growing season, a soil test will indicate what soil amendments are needed for the following season.
  • Dig a hole for each plant large enough to amply accommodate the root ball.
  • Set level with the surrounding soil. Fill with soil to the top of the root ball. Press soil down firmly with your hand leaving a slight depression around the plant to hold water.
  • Water thoroughly, so that a puddle forms in the saucer you have created. This settles the plants in, drives out air pockets and results in good root-to-soil contact.
  • Use the plant tag as a location marker.
  • For larger varieties inset the stake you will use to support them the same time you plant the tuber to avoid damaging the roots.

Call:(504) 861-4400 to book your camp!
What we offer:
Café au Clay Summer Camp Program exposes children to a variety of art techniques
and an understanding of the process of clay production. As the working studio of
Masque Powers, the only New Orleans hand made ceramic masks, your child will
work side by side with clay artist and artist of many other backgrounds. They will get to
experience working with wet mud, or “slip”,through all the process to create a glazed
finished ceramic art piece. Four highly skilled artists will share their techniques and
passion in each session. These sessions will include stories, history, games in
our garden, snacks, lunch, and of course masterpiece art work created by your child!
* Before and Aftercare is available at $5.00 an hour
Two Day Clay Building Camps
$ 65.00 Per Camper- From 8:30am- 12:30 Pm-Lunch Included
In These 2 day workshops, your child will learn the basics of slip casting all the way
to a finished piece. Day 1 we will work with the wet clay by building, sculpting and cutting
into unique and fun shapes. On the second day out team of artist will demonstrate painting
techniques and help your child fulfill their vision. These are Wednesday and Thursday Camps.
Dates of Camps Ceramic Projects
May 27th and 28th Make a Clock
June 3rd and 4th Masks and Dinosaur Night lights
June 10th and 11th Hanging Mobiles
June 24th and 25th Mosaic Table tops
July 1st and 2nd Make a Clock
July 8th and 9th A girls only Mask camp
July 15th and 16th A boys only Dinosaur Camp
Claymation Camps!
This a Ground Breaking full day Camp that will introduce your child to the techniques of animation
using Clay!!! Each session, the group will choose a pre-written 4 minute script. From there, the campers
will build miniature sets and characters from clay. They will learn to light the “set” and how to manipulate
their clay characters into movie motion!
They will also learn how to operate an animation camera and lay
down the soundtrack. Each participant will receive a DVD of their film the following day.
The Camp is $150.00 per camper. The camp goes from 8:30am-5:30pm and is limited to 10 campers.
This camp is for ages 10 and up and includes lunch and snacks.
The Camp will be held every Friday from May 29th to August 14th.

1 Day Camps
These Camps are from 8:30am- 12:30pm.
$30.00 per Camper
These camps are held Wednsedays and Thursdays.Lunch Included.

June 17th and June 18th is a Father’s Day Camp and we will be doing Father’s day gift making including “I love you Dad” Dinner plates, mugs,etc.
July 22nd is themed It’s All in the Name and we will Learn the meaning of your name and paint a name Plaque for your room.
July 23rd is a High School Musical themed camp where we willSing, Dance, and Paint to the beat on musical themed pottery pieces!
July 29th is a Picture Perfect camp where we will Paint a picture frame and take home a pictureof you making it!
July 30th is our #1 Saints Fan day camp where you will Paint your own Saints mugs, plates, bowls,Pencil holders, etc.
August 5th is the Fantastic Tales camp that will have Dragons and faries come alive with stories and make believe by creating your own ceramic version.
August 6th is the Banking on my Future camp where we will Discover all the reasons to save money and then paint your own special money bank.
August 12th and August 13this a Back to school camp to help you Get in the mood by painting the coolest 3 tiered pencil holder in the world.

2 Day Art Camps

These Camps are from 8:30am-12:30pm. $80.00 per camper. Lunch Included!
Over an 11 week period we will explore the history and techniques of major
art movements. On the first day we will use traditional materials used at the
time the original artists worked. On the second day your child will express their
own creative interpretation of the art period utilizing the techniques from the day before
on their own one of a kind ceramic masterpiece! These camps are held Mondays and
Tuesdays.
June 1st – 2nd and August 3rd- 4th we will be learning Cubism.
We will work on Geometric mugs to recreate the layers of the periods work.
June 8th – 9th and July 20th – 21st we will be learning aboutPop Art.
We will work on a square dinner plate and be inspired by the late modern art work
June 15th – 16th will be Impressionist art.
Inspired by artist such as Monet we will make impressionst works on tile.
June 22nd – 23rd is based onPost Impressionist
Working on a large dinner plate we will be inspired by the Avant Gaurde Artist of the period
June 29th – 30th we will discover Native American Art.
We will work on bowls inspired by Native American Rice bowls
July 6th – 7th and July 27th – 28th is a Scraffitti camp.
We will work on scratching back into artwork on a Plate.
July 13th -July 14th is a Water Color exploration.
we will Work on plates using water color techniques

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