Trumpet Vine

Trumpet Vine For Affordable At Tennessee Wholesale

Trumpet Vine — Campsis radicans. Trumpet Vine, sometimes called Trumpet Creeper, is a member of the Bignoniaceae family and is a wildflower that often grows along the sides of roads where it can cling to other bushes and trees in or near ditches. This perennial vine flower, native to the southeastern USA, features trumpet-shaped blooms in a variety of shades of yellow, orange and red. This fast-growing vine uses aerial roots to ascend walls, fences, trees, and bushes and can reach up to 40 feet high. The vines spread and multiply via underground runner roots as well as via bean-like pods which burst open, spreading seeds on the ground.

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Clusters of red trumpet-shaped flowers, up to three inches in length, grow throughout the summer months. The vine’s flowers produce abundant nectar and are very enticing to hummingbirds, making the vine a popular choice for hummingbird gardens. After flowering, the vine grows three- to five-inch-long seed pods that split open and release a two-winged seed that is quickly dispersed by the wind. The vine’s dark green, odd-pinnate leaves can grow up to 15-inches long, with each sheet having seven to 11 elliptical-shaped leaflets up to four inches long with serrated edges. Leaves become yellow in fall. Trumpet-vine soil requirements are ideally a rich, loamy, well-draining dirt, and is an excellent choice for hot, dry areas. However, the flowing vine is resilient enough to adapt and grows readily in any soil. On average, it takes three to four years for the trumpet vine to begin producing blooms.

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Trumpet vine usually does not need fertilizer. Native to the southeastern United States, the trumpet vine will thrive in hardy-planting. In the wild, trumpet vine typically occurs in wooded thickets and fields, along roadsides and waterways. Trumpet vine has many uses in landscaping, including woodland gardens and naturalized areas; ground cover and erosion control; disguising unattractive fences and camouflaging old tree stumps and rock piles; decorating mailboxes, trellises, lampposts, screening walls, and rambling stone walls; adding fall color; and providing roofing shade over arbors.

Trumpet Vine is a favorite among those who love hummingbirds and butterflies

Botanical Latin Name: Campsis radicans
Common Name: Trumpet vine
Sun Exposure: Partial sun to partial shade
Mature Height: 33 feet
Spread: 10 feet and over
Spacing: 10 to 12 inches
Growth Rate: Very rapid
Flowering Time: Summer
How Long It Flowers: All Summer
Flower Color: Orange-red and red, with a golden throat
Soil Requirements: Moist soils
Pruning: Needs to be pruned hard in the early spring. The vine proliferates and can grow everywhere, even onto telephone and electrical wires. The plant can become so massive it can take the wires down.
Flower Form: The trumpet vine gets its name from its beautiful, trumpet-shaped flower. Its alternate name is the hummingbird vine because of hummingbirds, with their long, thin beaks, love to drink nectar from this particular flower. The plant is perennial, which means it comes back year after year.

Trumpet Vine is a heat-loving plant

It has profoundly toothed, opposite leaflets and clings to surfaces by way of tendrils. It’s a heat-loving plant and is found everywhere throughout the south, though it’s also been seen as far north as Canada.

Trumpet Vine is known for its magnificent trumpet-shaped bloom

These lovely flowers attract hummingbirds form everywhere. The plant is very good at climbing on fences or trellises. Their blooms often take the colors of yellow or orange.

Trumpet Vine

Trumpet Shaped Flowers Stock Photos and Images

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  • Digitalis purpurea. Foxglove flower on white background
  • Large yellow trumpet shaped flowers of a tropical shrub in Costa Rica
  • Digitalis ‘Dalmatian Purple’. Foxglove flower
  • African lilly Agapanthus africanus with trumpet-shaped flowers
  • Digitalis Dalmatian Peach. Foxglove
  • Rhododendron Sunte Nectarine – Orange Azalea flowers
  • Digitalis purpurea Pams Split. Split petal foxglove flower
  • Lavatera cachemiriana Mallow Malvaceae. A flash of colour from these pink trumpet shaped flowers in full bloom.
  • Digitalis purpurea. Foxglove flower against a garden wall
  • Rhododendron Sunte Nectarine – Orange Azalea flowers
  • Digitalis purpurea. Foxglove flower
  • A close-up of the yellow/orange trumpet shaped flowers of Brugmansia x candida ‘Variegata ‘ – Angel’s trumpet
  • Digitalis purpurea, foxglove in an english garden
  • Vintage illustration of datura, poisonous flowering plant,especially the seeds and the trumpet-shaped flowers
  • Digitalis lutea. Small Yellow Foxglove. Straw Foxglove
  • A close-up of the yellow/orange trumpet shaped flowers of Brugmansia x candida ‘Variegata ‘ also known as the Angel’s trumpet flower
  • Digitalis ferruginea. Rusty foxglove
  • nicotania sylvestris white trumpet tobacco plant scented tubular trumpet shaped flowers
  • A plant with a tall stalk of red, trumpet shaped flowers, growing in the desert of Arizona in the spring.
  • Digitalis ferruginea. Rusty foxglove
  • Orange trumpet shaped flowers of the Orange Trumpet Vine (Pyrostegia venusta) in early autumn in Sussex, UK
  • trumpet shaped flowers
  • Digitalis ferruginea. Rusty foxglove
  • The red trumpet shaped flowers of Phygelius Devils Tears
  • Penstemon Andenken an Friedrich Hahn, Garnet. Red trumpet shaped flowers.
  • Digitalis ferruginea. Rusty foxglove
  • beautiful spring daffodils the epitome of spring fine art photography Jane Ann Butler Photography JABP289
  • Costus speciosus. Crepe Ginger flower in the Indian countryside. Andhra Pradesh, India. Cultivated in India for its medicinal uses
  • White,trumpet shaped flowers of the Autumn blooming alpine farden plant, Gentiana sino-ornata ‘Serenity’
  • Rhododendron Sunny Lepidote orange trumpet shaped flowers half hardy shrub dwarf
  • Costus speciosus. Crepe Ginger flower in the Indian countryside. Andhra Pradesh, India. Cultivated in India for its medicinal uses
  • Petunia Fanfare ‘Creme de Cassis’ flowers.
  • Digitalis ‘Dalmatian white’ Foxglove flowers against dark stormy skies
  • Datura stramonium with trumpet shaped flowers used in traditional medicine to relieve asthma. It is also hallucinogenic and deliriant, toxic in quantity.
  • Campsis x tagliabuana ‘Madam Galen’ salmon red trumpet shaped flowers in full bloom
  • Digitalis ‘Dalmatian white’ and ‘Dalmatian purple’ Foxglove flowers against dark stormy skies
  • nicotania sylvestris white trumpet tobacco plant scented tubular trumpet shaped flowers
  • The trumpet-shaped light pink flowers of Powell’s swamp lily (Crinum × powellii)
  • Trumpet-shaped flowers of Clivia miniata, deep orange. This evergreen plant has strap-shaped dark green leaves and propagates naturally from seeds.
  • A portrait of some angel’s trumpet flowers with a blue sky with some white clouds behind them.
  • Digitalis purpurea. Foxglove through young lavender plants in an English country garden
  • A Scarlet Gilia flower stalk showing the array of red trumpet shaped flowers.
  • The reddish pink flowers of Phygelius Devils Tears
  • Penstemon Andenken an Friedrich Hahn, Garnet. Red trumpet shaped flowers.
  • Foxgloves – Digitalis purpurea flowers
  • Markhamia lutea flower top view, Nile Trumpet, evergreen tree, yellow trumpet shaped flowers, orange-reddish spots
  • a taste of spring beautiful white rhododendron cluster with pale pink bud fine art photography Jane Ann Butler JABP437
  • White,trumpet shaped flowers of the Autumn blooming alpine farden plant, Gentiana sino-ornata ‘Serenity’
  • Rhododendron Sunny Lepidote orange trumpet shaped flowers half hardy shrub dwarf
  • Trumpet-shaped Flowers Purple Bindweed, Convolvulus arvensis, an Invasive Vine Species aka Perennial Morning Glory, Field Bindweed or Creeping Jenny
  • Petunia ‘Fanfare Eclipse’ flowers.
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Vintage illustration of Datura stramonium with trumpet shaped flowers, used in traditional medicine to relieve asthma. It is also hallucinogenic and deliriant, toxic in quantity.
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Firecracker Plant with red and white small trumpet like flowers, Coral Fountain, Russelia equisetiformis, Sunshine coast, Queensland, Australia
  • Hemerocallis Burning Daylight daylily fragrant orange yellow trumpet shaped flowers
  • The trumpet-shaped light pink flowers of Powell’s swamp lily (Crinum × powellii)
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Clematis ‘Princess Diana’
  • Yellow Trumpet Flowers
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • The reddish pink flowers of Phygelius Devils Tears
  • Penstemon Andenken an Friedrich Hahn, Garnet. Red trumpet shaped flowers.
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Markhamia lutea flower side view, Nile Trumpet, evergreen tree, yellow trumpet shaped flowers, orange-reddish spots
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • White,trumpet shaped flowers of the Autumn blooming alpine farden plant, Gentiana sino-ornata ‘Serenity’
  • Rhododendron Sunny Lepidote orange trumpet shaped flowers half hardy shrub dwarf
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Petunia ‘Surfinia Lime’ flowers.
  • Trumpet Lily, Kungslilja (Lilium regale)
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Angel’s trumpet flowers, Rombauer Vineyards, Silverado Trail, Saint Helena, Napa Valley, Napa County, California, United States, North America
  • Firecracker Plant with red and white small trumpet like flowers, Coral Fountain, Russelia equisetiformis, Sunshine coast, Queensland, Australia
  • Lilium Red Carpet Asiatic Lily red trumpet shaped blooms
  • The trumpet-shaped light pink flowers of Powell’s swamp lily (Crinum × powellii)
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Clematis ‘Princess Diana’
  • Alpine Rock Thyme flowers (Acinos alpinus) against a plain white background
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Close up of the part of the flower spike of Digitalis Pams Choice
  • Penstemon Andenken an Friedrich Hahn, Garnet. Red trumpet shaped flowers.
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Markhamia lutea, Nile Tulip, Nile Trumpet, evergreen tree, pinnate leaves, yellow trumpet shaped flowers, orange-reddish spots
  • Thunbergia Erecta Kings’ Mantle Live Plant Vivid Purple Trumpet Shaped Flowers among the leaves
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Narcissus buster, colourful daffodils flowering in an English garden during March, trumpet shaped flowers
  • Tree full of flowers beautiful pink trumpet shaped blossoms Latin name Tabebuia impetiginosa
  • Petunia Designer Buzz Purple flowers.
  • Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis. Red Hibiscus flower on white background
  • Trumpet Lily, Kungslilja (Lilium regale)
  • Ipomoea ‘morning glory’ Grandpas Ott in an English garden
  • Firecracker Plant with red and white small trumpet like flowers, Coral Fountain, Russelia equisetiformis, Sunshine coast, Queensland, Australia
  • Ipomoea ‘morning glory’ Grandpas Ott in an English garden
  • The purple flowers of a toad lily (Tricyrtis formosana)
  • Angel’s trumpet flowers, Rombauer Vineyards, Silverado Trail, Saint Helena, Napa Valley, Napa County, California, United States, North America
  • Ipomoea ‘morning glory’ Grandpas Ott in an English garden
  • Lilium Orange Pixie dwarf Asiatic lily flowers
  • Blue African Lily (Agapanthus) flowers in bloom in late summer. UK
  • Close up of the part of the flower spike of Digitalis Pams Choice

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Search Results for Trumpet Shaped Flowers Stock Photos and Images

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What is this plant with trumpet-shaped flowers seen in Queens, NY?

I agree with Bamboo that this looks like a Mirabilis jalapa. I live in the United States and call it the Four O’Clock.

I’ve been growing them for a number of years. I’m in Massachusetts, zone 6, so we have pretty much the same climate, although you may be a bit warmer. Obviously, since you’re seeing them locally, they thrive well, and would be something for you to try. They’re definitely an annual in my zone, and would probably be for you too, although they will overwinter in warmer areas.

Mirabilis come in many colors, most of which have the same color on the whole plant. There are also a few striking multi-colored varieties, like Kaleidoscope, pictured on the left below, (photo source), and Broken Colors, (photo source), on the right.

I grow mine from seed. They germinate easily in about 8-10 days and produce strong seedlings which stand up to weather conditions, even when small. (Sometimes I start them indoors in the winter under gro-lights, but that’s not necessary.) When mature they can reach up to two feet tall.

The signal for the flower to open is not the time, but the drop in temperature, so Four O’Clock is sort of a misnomer. In fact, mine generally don’t begin opening until closer to Five O’Clock, especially on very hot days when cooling comes later. Most of the source materials say the blooms should last either well into the evening or even overnight. This has never been the case for me. Mine are generally only open for a few hours before closing again. I don’t like them any less, I’m just relaying my experience.

I prefer growing them in large pots, partly because I can force the flowers by moving them to a shadier spot as the day goes on, and partly because I like rearranging things! They grow very well in the garden though, and are often bigger, most likely because there’s more root space for spreading out.

As for ease of growth, they’re not very fussy. A sunny area with at least part-shade is best. The first year I kept them in the sunniest part of my yard and some of the lovely flowers never opened at all. They’re fine in the heat. While drought-tolerant to an extent, they will become droopy and have a hard time flowering if they don’t get some water when the ground becomes very dry. Under-watering is better than over-watering though, and good drainage is very important. In pots, I use a packaged potting soil, but in the ground, no special dirt or soil-amendment is necessary.

Butterflies and hummingbirds are attracted to the trumpet shaped flowers, sweet nectar, and almost citrus-like scent. Planting them near other flowers that hummingbirds like, and away from hummingbird feeders, can encourage a beautiful congregation at the end of the day when other flowers have gone to bed.

What is this small annual with white trumpet-shaped flowers?

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By Julie Christensen

Gardening expert, Michael Dirr has commented that if you can’t grow trumpet vine (Campsis radicans), you might as well give up gardening. Indeed, in the right conditions, this fast-growing vine is a cinch to grow. In mild, moist climates, the vine can become downright aggressive. It grows quickly to 30 feet tall or more, and attaches itself with aerial rootlets to almost any surface.

If you can temper its aggressive nature, trumpet vine (also called trumpet creeper) makes a showy, extravagant landscaping vine. Grow it on a strong structure, such as a fence or arbor, and give it at least 8 to 10 feet to stretch out. It has dark green leaves that are alternately palmate. The vine produces trumpet-shaped flowers in coral, yellow, red or orange, from mid-to-late summer. The bright blooms act as a magnet for hummingbirds.

Planting Trumpet Vine

Trumpet vine thrives in USDA plant hardiness zones 5 through 9. Plant potted nursery plants in spring, after the last frost. You can also sow seeds in the fall and store the pots in a cold frame. Take cuttings in winter for spring planting.

In hot climates, trumpet vine tolerates partial shade, but it blooms best in full sun. Native to the southeastern United States, trumpet vine tolerates almost any soil type, so long as it drains well. Soils that have moderate to poor fertility seem to work better than rich, fertile ones.

Fertilize trumpet vine in the spring with a ¼ cup of 10-10-10 fertilizer. Water it frequently immediately after planting. Established plants prefer consistently moist conditions, but they’ll tolerate some drought. If you live in a warm, moist climate, cut back further on watering, which can help prevent invasiveness.

Trumpet vine spreads through underground runners, as well as seed. Mulch the soil, which can help prevent some self-sowing, and pull up any volunteers that appear. Remove the seed pods and destroy them. Trumpet vine produces blooms on new wood, so you can prune it in spring without fear of destroying the flowers. Prune it back hard, especially in warm climates. Trumpet vines can take five to six years to become established and bloom well, but once they get going, watch out!

Pests and Disease

The trumpet vine’s hardy nature means it can fight off most insect pests and diseases. The most common diseases include powdery mildew and leaf spot. In most cases, you can ignore these problems. Planting trumpet vine in full sun, with adequate space so air circulates freely, can prevent most fungal diseases. Remove any diseased plant material and treat with a fungicide if the problem becomes severe.

Trumpet vines are sometimes bothered by leaf-sucking insects, such as leafhoppers, whiteflies and aphids. Dislodge them with a steady stream of water or apply an insecticidal soap or oil to the leaves. In most cases, the insect pests move on before the damage is sufficient enough to warrant chemical treatments.

Varieties

  • Campsis radicans ‘Apricot’ is a very common variety that grows to 15 feet tall. It produces 4 inch long blooms in apricot hues.
  • Campsis x tagliabuana ‘Madame Galen’ is an old hybrid between Campsis radicans, the American native, and Campsis grandiflora, which is native to China. The resulting plant grows 15 feet tall and produces lovely salmon-colored blooms. ‘Madame Galen’ is less invasive than Campsis radicans varieties.
  • Campsis radicans ‘Indian Summer’ is hardier than most trumpet vines, growing in USDA zones 4 through 9. This woody vine produces yellowish-orange blooms that have red throats.

For more information on trumpet vines, visit the following links:

Pruning Trumpet Vines from Iowa State University Extension

The Right Vine in the Right Spot from Colorado State University Extension

This YouTube video covers the basics of the trumpet vine.

Julie Christensen learned about gardening on her grandfather’s farm and mother’s vegetable garden in southern Idaho. Today, she lives and gardens on the high plains of Colorado. When she’s not digging in the dirt, Julie writes about food, education, parenting and gardening.

I have trumpet vine that is growing very well, however, it has been established for a few years now and has never bloomed. What would be the reason or cause for it not having blooms? Thank you! P.S. I am “gardening challenged!”

Campsis radicans (perennial, zones 4 through 9) also known as trumpet vine or trumpet creeper is a great North American native plant for attracting hummingbirds and butterflies to your garden. They just can’t resist the red, tubular blooms! It will bloom continuously through the summer, but it needs full sun to do so, at least 6 hours. I suspect that your plants are not getting enough light.

I suggest you transplant it to a sunnier location. Do this in early spring before it starts to grow. If it is a large plant, cut it back to a manageable size, leaving some of the leafy vines intact. Dig it out, maintaining as much soil around the roots as possible and plant in its new location immediately. Keep it consistently watered through the growing season and it should rebound quite nicely.

Trumpet vine is a rapid grower that will quickly cover an unsightly fence or screen an unwanted view. This plant loves the heat, is highly drought tolerant and resists pests and disease.

With all these merits it is wonder why many gardeners cringe when trumpet creeper comes up in conversation. I’ve never known a plant to be so loved and reviled at the same time. The problem is that trumpet creeper can be invasive. Given the right conditions it can overwhelm your and your neighbor’s garden in just a few seasons. Here are a few tips for keeping this rampant spreader under control.

1. Location, location location! Select a site that is away from your house, special trees and other elements you don’t want swallowed up by this plant. Treat this plant like a specimen rather than a companion to your other plants. Also, the flowers and seed pods can be messy so avoid using this as a cover for pergolas or outdoor entertaining areas.

2. Try planting the vine in a large, plastic pot with the bottom cut out. Plant the pot and vine in the garden. This is a trick I use with another flowerbed invader, mint. This planting method keeps the roots in check, preventing it from spreading by underground runners.

3. Remove the faded flowers and seed pods to prevent wildlife from spreading the seeds. This will also promote bushier growth.

4. To control the size of the plant, prune it hard in late winter.

5. As with any invasive plant, check with your local cooperative extension before planting trumpet vine. While it is just a garden thug in some regions, it can be a serious problem in others.

With diligence and proper placement, trumpet creeper can be a divine addition to a garden. On a trip to the Biltmore I was delighted to see it used along with wisteria as a cover for the Library Terrace. The leafy canopy created by the two plants offered a shady spot to rest and take in the all the beautiful sights!

Other trumpet vines to try are ‘Flava’, which produces yellow flowers or ‘Madame Galen’, which has extra-large red-orange blossoms.

Campsis radicans ‘FLAMENCO’

Trumpet creepers are gorgeous things in summer gardens, on patios, or climbing up walls, gazebos or fences. They are fast and vigorously growing vines that can create a dense coverage of bright green foliage with profusion of flowers within only a few years.
If you like red flowers in summer, Flamenco variety of north-american trumpet creeper is a perfect choice. It bears plentiful of trumpet shaped, up to 7 cm long flowers with yellow throats and red veins. They are formed at the ends of current year’s branches in rich umbels. Pinnate leaves are large, deciduous, deep green and rather exotic looking. They may gain burgundy red margins and shades throughout the season. Trumpet creeper bursts into buds quite late – in April. On the contrary its flowering lasts from early July until first frosts when fully established.
For profusion of flowers it needs to be pruned every spring after the worst frosts (end March). Cut all last year’s branches to 2-3 pairs of live buds. Trumpet creeper flowers on new shoots so the more shoots you have the more flowers you get. Though it makes a lot of aerial roots it needs a little bit of help tying up the first branches to its support as it cannot twine around it like wisteria for example.
Trumpet creepers need limey soil and a warm and sunny spot. Its root system can accept temporary drought and extra watering is desirable only maximum once a week. It grows vigorously and makes deep roots. However, our plants proved to be alright in limited space – 30×50 cm, 40 cm deep. Fully hardy to -29°C (USDA zone 5), possibly more.
We only sell plants that will flower the same year you buy them.
Last update 25-07-2009.

Flamenco Trumpetvine flowers

Flamenco Trumpetvine flowers

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Flamenco Trumpetvine in bloom

Flamenco Trumpetvine in bloom

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 40 feet

Spread: 24 inches

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 4b

Other Names: Trumpetcreeper

Description:

An extremely beautiful cultivar of this very vigorous vine, can grow tens of feet in a year; beautiful red trumpet-shaped flowers with orange throats in summer; does well in poor soils; extremely attractive to hummingbirds

Ornamental Features

Flamenco Trumpetvine features bold clusters of red trumpet-shaped flowers with orange throats at the ends of the branches from early summer to early fall. It has dark green foliage throughout the season. The large serrated pointy pinnately compound leaves turn yellow in fall. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes

Flamenco Trumpetvine is a dense multi-stemmed deciduous woody vine with a twining and trailing habit of growth. Its average texture blends into the landscape, but can be balanced by one or two finer or coarser trees or shrubs for an effective composition.

This is a high maintenance woody vine that will require regular care and upkeep, and can be pruned at anytime. It is a good choice for attracting birds and hummingbirds to your yard, but is not particularly attractive to deer who tend to leave it alone in favor of tastier treats. Gardeners should be aware of the following characteristic(s) that may warrant special consideration;

  • Suckering
  • Invasive

Flamenco Trumpetvine is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Hedges/Screening
  • General Garden Use

Planting & Growing

Flamenco Trumpetvine will grow to be about 40 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. As a climbing vine, it tends to be leggy near the base and should be underplanted with low-growing facer plants. It should be planted near a fence, trellis or other landscape structure where it can be trained to grow upwards on it, or allowed to trail off a retaining wall or slope. It grows at a fast rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 20 years.

This woody vine does best in full sun to partial shade. It is very adaptable to both dry and moist locations, and should do just fine under average home landscape conditions. It is considered to be drought-tolerant, and thus makes an ideal choice for xeriscaping or the moisture-conserving landscape. It is not particular as to soil type or pH, and is able to handle environmental salt. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This is a selection of a native North American species.

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