Yellow book gardens to visit

Look out for sensory gardens, those offering accommodation and delicious treats, and learn how to yellow book gardens to visit create your own patch. if searching for a town, county, region or by garden name please make yellow book gardens to visit sure you click on the relevant one in the dropdown list before clicking find a garden. bill burns, the kennel at burns gardens, bg dogs, havanese dog kennel in western washington state, champion havanese, havanese art, gifts, suzi burns. buy the yellow book: gardens to visit in england and wales: nhbs – the national yellow book gardens to visit gardens scheme ( ngs), constable. this book traces the history of garden visitation and examines tourist motivations to visit gardens.

pale yellows illuminate night gardens. the garden tourist is a specialty travel book aimed at weekend gardeners, professional landscape designers and vacation travelers. sunday 26 marchpm. get reviews and contact details for each business including videos, opening hours and more. yellow magnolia café is a garden café set on the lily pool terrace at brooklyn botanic yellow book gardens to visit garden. plan your garden visits in england, wales & scotland, find out about garden events, read exclusive articles and more at gardens to visit. the site includes the gardenfinder database for finding gardens to visit.

find a garden to visit from one of 3, 500 gardens that open for the national garden scheme across england and wales. the fully revised and updated cdc yellow book compiles the us government’ s most current travel health guidelines, including pretravel vaccine recommendations, destination- specific health advice, and easy- to- reference maps, tables, and charts. there are yellow book gardens to visit two ways you can buy books by tony russell, online or by post. ngs gardens to visit ( formerly the yellow book) lists approximately 3, 500 gardens, the majority of which are open to the public. use our find a garden search.

if searching by postcode please enter the full postcode. the number of private gardens unlocking their gates for charity under the yellow book scheme has rocketed over recent years – thanks to the. com is dedicated to providing our users with the local yellow pages information that they need, when they need it. top yorkshire gardens: see reviews and photos of gardens in yorkshire, england on tripadvisor. credit: wikimedia/ jean christoff benoist ( cc by) credit: flickr/ yellow. national gardens scheme – the charity behind the yellow book of gardens open to the yellow book gardens to visit public. so if you’ re looking to enjoy a weekend of family fun whilst supporting a good cause then why not visit one of these beautiful gardens which will be opening for charity during father’ s day weekend? cdc travelers’ health branch provides updated travel information, notices, yellow book gardens to visit and vaccine requirements to inform international travelers and provide guidance to the clinicians who serve them.

sat nav le15 8be when? book description. gardens in rutland open under national garden scheme.

october is a perfect time to walk amidst trees in the full glory of their autumn foliage. ( joe swift) book description. nothing will get you in the mood for autumn like these charming gardens filled with vibrant colours of trees and shrubs. private garden visiting, historical garden tourism, urban gardens, and a myriad of festivals, shows and events all allow yellow book gardens to visit the green- fingered enthusiast to appreciate the natural world. gardens ( yellow book) scotland’ s gardens scheme ( yellow book) – garden visit group ( 2) this is a new group formed in. the yellow book gardens to visit national gardens scheme is a country wide programme that. highest rated places of interest or tour.

are listed in a small yellow book, available in local book shops and the internet. i am indebted to our county organiser rose dejardin for allowing me to share this information with you. fully updated and supported by an online database, ngs gardens to visit is now easier to use than ever. the ethiopian yellow pages is once again pleased to present yet another edition of your favorite business and community resource guide, “ the 24th ethiopian yellow pages edition. find botanical gardens in california on yellowbook. it is packed with full- colour photographs and informed comment. the maldon district is home to an array of stunning gardens that you can visit over the summer period.

yellow bay gardens, bigfork. previously known as the yellow book, ngs gardens to visit is the national gardens scheme’ s annual essential garden- visiting guide to nearly 4, 000 locations in england and wales, supporting nursing, yellow book gardens to visit caring and gardening charities. we grow all kinds of crazy stuff like goats, chickens, ducks, pigs and two hungry growing boys. national garden scheme’ s yellow book gardens.

please select a location below to find local business information in your area. how to create a yellow garden when designing garden schemes with yellow plants, beware that a monochromatic planting can look unpleasant. uk gunthorpe hall, near oakham. the yellow book gardens to visit yellow book includes important travel medicine updates:. whether you want to visit a cottage garden or an ‘ outdoor room’, a formal estate or a sculpture garden, the yellow book’ s got the lot! initially, the garden tour in england and wales involves private gardens and gardens that does not accept visitors regularly under the national gardens scheme, when ” gardens of england and wales open for charity” ( the ‘ yellow book’ ) served as a guide book for those seeking to visit gardens in england and wales.

often small and usual gardens open just one or two days a year. the restaurant serves modern, healthy cuisine with locally farmed ingredients. yellow appears fresh and radiant on the hottest days. the garden tourist: 120 destination gardens and nurseries in the northeast on amazon. here are some of the most beautiful gardens to visit. gardens to visit in yorkshire you will find many beautiful gardens in yorkshire open to the public to visit which might surprise you. the ridges’, a private garden covering some 3. published annually in spring and previously known as the yellow book, ngs gardens to visit lists nearly 4, 000 gardens open for visiting.

your perfect garden awaits. 5 acres, is one of lancashire’ s well- known gardens to visit, having featured in the ngs ( national gardens scheme) yellow book since 1995 and can also be found on yellow book gardens to visit the britain’ s finest website. you can buy the yellow book in bookshops and online at the national gardens scheme website for £ 8. the latest tweets from yellow book gardens to visit ngs kent gardens the most up- to- date information on beautiful gardens open in kent for the national garden scheme/ yellow book! books & guides written by tony russell. yellow gardens also bring warmth to the landscape at those times of year when the sun’ s rays are not at their peak, such as spring and autumn. the book is divided into counties and greater london and you can locate a garden to visit either by date or by name.

a narrow side yard or dim courtyard takes on a bright new look when it features plantings with a yellow theme. the original source to find and connect with local plumbers, handymen, mechanics, attorneys, dentists, and more. ” the ethiopian yellow pages always remembers that our existence and expansion as a community institution are tied to our advertisers and users, particularly the. check out our picks for the 10 must- see gardens in europe.

gardens to visit this autumn. you can get yellow book gardens to visit a full break down of all the gardens available to visit this year in the ngs garden visitor’ s handbook. keep up- to- date with nhbs products,. we list over 25 from cottage style gardens, to the more formal, and then informal. * free* shipping on qualifying offers. these garden visits will be at the weekend to gardens in the above scheme ( see link to scotland’ s gardens scheme website on this page). english people love gardens and the cotswolds have some of the most yellow book gardens to visit beautiful gardens in the country which are open to the public.

these open gardens are home to formal flower beds, herbaceous borders, wildlife walks, ornamental kitchen gardens, beautiful meadows and more. for fuller details, especially regarding directions and disabled access, please refer to ngs. europe’ s 10 must- visit gardens. the book shop gardens to visit.

centers for disease control and prevention ( cdc). provided by the u. the national gardens scheme’ s, the yellow book lists almost 4, 000 gardens open to the public on specific days to raise money for charity.

use yellow flowers and leaves in window boxes and baskets to create a warm, cheerful look. it’ s a brilliant tool for getting to see gems of gardens that you never knew existed. yellow increases a sense of space. the national gardens scheme’ s annual essential garden- visiting guide to nearly 4, 000 locations in england and wales, supporting nursing, caring and gardening charities.

garden lovers visiting tetbury and the surrounding area are spoilt for choice with several national acclaimed gardens nearby.

Exbury Gardens near Southampton has one of the finest displays of rhododendrons in the world and a beautiful woodland garden on the banks of the River Beaulieu in the New Forest, Hampshire. Camellias and magnolias should still be among the star attractions although rhododendrons and azaleas will be taking over the limelight now. There are also carpets of bluebells. The garden is very family friendly with the famous Exbury Steam Railway which circles part of the gardens, plus special Easter events. (02380 891203; www.exbury.co.uk

There are 1,000 acres of landscaped gardens, lakes and woodland to explore at Savill Gardens, Valley Gardens and Virginia Water, collectively known as The Royal Landscape. There’s a new family treasure trail for the Easter weekend, but the real Easter treat is Savill Garden’s spectacular Azalea Walks. This Surrey garden is also home to a designer Rose Garden, opened by the Queen last year, and its New Zealand Garden has more native New Zealand plants than anywhere outside NZ itself. There is an entrance fee for Savill Gardens, but it’s free to visit Virginia Water’s lakeside follies and woods. Valley Gardens with its marked trails and flowering cherry trees, azaleas and magnolias, are also free – but you have to pay to park. (01753 847519;www.theroyallandscape.co.uk)

Ever thought about opening your garden to the public? How to join the NGS open garden scheme.

You don’t need a garden that looks like Hampton Court in order to open it up to the public. Your garden could be of interest to others, provided it is considered to be ‘worth visiting’ and to be exceptional in certain respects. The criteria for open gardens is ‘quality, character and interest’. The National Garden Scheme (NGS) reputedly recommends that the garden needs to ‘offer 45 minutes of interest to visitors’. ‍ Garden lovers just enjoy looking at other people’s special places!

Popular leisure activity

It seems that visiting gardens is now one of the most popular British leisure activities. And the NGS provides a highly efficient co-ordination scheme. It commenced back in 1927 with the aim to raise money for The Queen’s Nursing Institute. At that time it was largely the aristocratic or wealthy who opened their doors to the middle classes who couldn’t wait to see what went on within the garden walls. ‍Who wouldn’t want to take a look inside this secret garden? Now, just about anyone can do it! You will need garden passion, vision, commitment and quite a lot of time, but most people feel that the rewards are well worth it. If you are highly enthusiastic about your garden and other people seem to like it too, it’s possibly a candidate for opening under the NGS.

How to find gardens that open to the public

There are currently around 3,700 gardens which open each year in this way and these can be found in the Garden Visitor’s Handbook which is often known as the ‘yellow book’. ‍The famous NGS ‘Yellow Book’ is a great way to plan some rewarding days out. They are also detailed on the NGS website: www.ngs.org.uk. These are all private gardens that open for charity, so opening to the public not only gives visitors a great day out but also helps to fund good causes. Some people open their gardens once per year, others open the garden gate several times, it’s entirely up to the owner. ‍Spring is a great time to visit other people’s gardens!

How to open your own garden under the NGS

Personnel from the National Gardens Scheme need to approve gardens before they are accepted for opening. The organisation has a team of volunteers who can not only provide information to gardens owners, but they will also come and visit to see if your garden is suitable and offer advice where needed. Every garden that opens needs to be identified, categorised and itemised for the website and publication and there are health and safety issues to be considered too. It’s impossible to prevent absolutely every type of mis-hap, indeed there are records showing that ‘granny fell into the stream’ at one open garden event! ‍The Yellow Book includes symbols to show potential visitors what it includes at a glance. Each garden is labelled according to many different criteria including whether or not it is wheelchair-friendly, dog-friendly, whether it has refreshment facilities, toilets, car parking, plants for sale and whether or not it can accept groups. Some gardens even provide music and entertainment for their visitors! ‍Other people’s gardens are fascinating!

Plan for the future

Planning ahead is essential! Opening a garden under the NGS can take many months to set up. The NGS official representative will generally time their visit to coincide with the month in which you would like the garden to open. This means that they will view the garden during the appropriate season. Don’t imagine you can open next week without any preparation, it is more likely to be next year. There’s a lot that happens behind the scenes at these events. Not only must your garden be ‘visitor-ready’ but you’ll need to think about baking cakes; marketing; publicity; organising volunteers to take entry money, serve teas and even to guide traffic and tours. ‍Home made cakes are always popular at an open garden event!

Rewards!

What can you gain from attending or hosting an open garden event? Hopefully, you will meet lots of friendly people, receive great feedback and gain plenty of enthusiastic inspiration. What’s in it for you? After all the hard work and possible anxiety generated by getting things ready, satisfaction is the number one benefit! Gardeners and garden lovers are mostly friendly, positive and interesting people and you are likely to gain new friends and a lot of fun from their visit. What’s more, it’s a great way to exchange ideas and to receive compliments from those who have enjoyed their visit. You’ll also know that funds raised are going to a good charitable cause – it’s a win-win situation. ‍ Getting a garden ready for opening to the public can be rather stressful, but the rewards are worth the effort. Telephone 01483 211 535 to speak to one of the NGS team. ‍ You need to prepare for opening a garden to the public. You can’t organise the weather but everything else is up to you. Competitions! Garden lovers have plenty of opportunity to engage in their favourite pastime whilst entering competitions. There are competitions for having the best lawn (a recent winner claimed to mow his lawn six times every week including on Christmas day), village in bloom competitions, horticultural shows and photographic competitions. If you are an amateur photographer or simply a garden enthusiast, you might be interested in The National Garden Scheme photography competition which is held in association with the BBC Gardener’s World Magazine. Don’t delay: the competition runs from 15th March to 28th August 2018. ‍ Photographic competitions are a great way to make people really look at a subject in order to capture its beauty.

Competition categories

There are categories to inspire all budding photographers:

  • Town Gardens
  • Design Details
  • Beautiful Garden Views
  • Garden Wildlife
  • People in gardens
  • BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine – Fantastic Flowers

‍ Do you have a beautiful Clematis that will be flowering soon? You could try entering your photos into a competition! Judges will put forward category winners into a competition to win the Best Overall Photo prize. Each category winner can choose tools from the current WOLF-Garten range, up to £100. The overall winner will win a WOLF-Garten 72v lithium bundle, including lawnmower, leaf blower, hedge trimmer, and grass trimmer, worth £950. ‍ Flowers make a great subject for close-up photography. Is your photo good enough to enter into a competition?

Entry requirements:

All photos entered must be taken at a National Garden Scheme open garden between 15 March and 28 August 2018. Entry and further details from www.ngs.org.uk/photo

Looking for the answer to to Clue – Range of hills in southern England? Don’t worry, we are here to assist you!
Many studies have shown that the best way to develop the human brain is through solving crossword puzzles.
Knowledge is power but we as humans get confused, exhausted and don’t always know all the answers, so what can be done?
This is where we come into the picture! On this website we have developed a smart system which contains millions of questions and answers for all kinds of crossword puzzles, which will provide you with assistance in finding the answer for the clue “Range of hills in southern England”.
After a thorough check up , the system will find a suitable answer for the clue “Range of hills in southern England” .

Possible Answer: CHILTERNS,

Category Name Date Answer
Irish Times Simplex 7 February 2003 CHILTERNS

Range of hills in southern England – Last Seen: 7 February 2003 | Irish Times Simplex

Have we succeeded in helping you in solving the crossword? Think a more accurate answer exists for Range of hills in southern England Clue? Then take the initiative into your hands and leave a comment!

10 of the UK’s best alternative mountain and hill walks

Lake District

Skip Helvellyn via Striding Edge
Give this a go instead High Street via Long Stile ridge

Helvellyn is a wonderful mountain, a huge throne of stone carved by glaciers, but the Lake District’s third-highest peak is yet another victim of the honeypot effect. Erosion has already wiped out some rare Arctic-alpine plants and is endangering the likes of the schelly fish, an ice age remnant found in the mountain’s Red Tarn.

Climbing High Street fell from Haweswater via Long Stile ridge shares ingredients with the ascent of Helvellyn via the famously airy arête of Striding Edge. You get a superb ridge and a stern glacial cirque, topping out on a broad plateau with the Lakeland fells laid out around you, but without the long procession of people. Long Stile is a mild scramble, but well within the abilities of most hill walkers, and the top of High Street (named after the Roman road that crossed its summit) is one of the finest vantage points in the Lake District.

A lone figure on a pinnacle on Scafell. Photograph: Nigel Wilkins/Alamy

Skip Scafell Pike
Give this a go instead Scafell

Climb Scafell Pike on a sunny bank holiday, and you have to jostle for the summit cairn with a crowd the size of a small festival. But those who climb to the top of England’s second-highest peak, its silent sibling, Scafell – less than a mile away and only slightly lower (14 metres) – can enjoy the same huge views, quite possibly from an empty summit and in a silence broken only by the occasional croak of a raven.

This contrast is remarkable, and partly thanks to Broad Stand, a treacherous crag that acts as a bulwark stopping people hopping between the two peaks. The most direct route up Scafell is from Wasdale, but the best is the long, challenging ascent via the Esk gorge, which is studded with waterfalls tumbling into icy blue plunge pools, perfect for the aquatically inclined – and thermally resilient – on a broiling summer’s day. Upper Eskdale feels like England’s answer to a Himalayan sanctuary, a spectacular hanging valley reached only by the dedicated pilgrim of the Lake District’s wilder corners.

The Highlands

The view across Loch Morlich to Cairn Gorm and the northern corries. Photograph: Julian Cartwright/Alamy

Skip Ben Nevis
Give this a go instead Cairn Gorm and the northern corries

The most popular path up Ben Nevis – the Mountain Track from Glen Nevis – is perfect if you just want to tick the “Britain’s highest mountain” box. Getting up it is an achievement but the route can be a bit purgatorial – a series of switchbacks up the most formless side of the mountain. And it’s usually heaving.

For adventure on a similar size and scale but with fewer people, the circuit from the Cairngorm Mountain ski centre car park up to Cairn Lochan, over the awesome crags of the northern corries to Cairn Gorm (Britain’s sixth-highest mountain), and down via Sròn an Aonaich ticks several boxes. It takes in some of the most spectacular mountain architecture in Britain and skirts the Cairngorm plateau, the highest terrain in Britain beyond Ben Nevis itself. As on any hill walk, proper equipment, a close look at a mountain weather forecast and good navigational skills are essential.

Skip The Cobbler (AKA Beinn Artair or Ben Arthur)
Give this a go instead The Tarmachan Ridge

View from Ben Lawers summit, showing Beinn Ghlas, Meall Corranaich and Meall nan Tarmachan. Photograph: Julian Cartwright/Alamy

Most Scottish hills never see anything like the crowds of some of their counterparts in England and Wales, but the Cobbler, in the southern Highlands, is one of the few exceptions to the rule. Though a splendid mountain, its proximity to Glasgow and the Central Belt, combined with the pull of its Tolkienesque, rock-fortress summit (the origin of its “nickname”) means the summer crowds are rarely absent.

Meall nan Tarmachan, a little further north, lacks such an unmistakeable profile but the traverse of its full length, balancing along rocky ridges and grassy arêtes surrounded by a sea of summits, is one of the best mountain walking experiences in the Southern Highlands. The mild –and avoidable – scramble on the descent from Meall Garbh does not quite offer the thrill of “threading the needle” (the head-swimmingly exposed scramble to the top of the Cobbler), but it adds a bit of spice to the mix.

Brecon Beacons

View from Twmpa towards Hay Bluff. Photograph: Cody Duncan/Alamy

Skip Pen y Fan
Give this a go instead Hay Bluff and Twmpa

Last Good Friday, as the sun beat down on the top of Pen y Fan, highest peak in south Wales, saw an increasingly common phenomenon: walkers formed an orderly line to get that all-important summit selfie. The queue was a quarter of a mile long. Take a bow, Britain – we have literally taken our queuing habit to new heights.

If you don’t fancy the sound of this, head east, to the wonderfully overlooked Black Mountains. Hay Bluff, just south of Hay-on-Wye on the mountains’ main north-east-facing escarpment, and nearby Twmpa (which also goes by the unfortunate monicker of Lord Hereford’s Knob) provide a similar “top of the world” feeling, but with a fraction of the crowds. Semi-wild ponies roam the ridges, and kestrels and buzzards hang in the updraft. Go on a day of far-reaching visibility to make the most of the vast views over the rural patchwork of Herefordshire and into the hilly heart of Wales.

Yorkshire Dales

The summit of Buckden Pike, Upper Wharfedale. Photograph: David Forster/Alamy

Skip Yorkshire Three Peaks
Give this a go instead Wharfedale Three Peaks

More than a mere long walk, the magnificent 23-mile circuit of Pen-y-Ghent, Whernside and Ingleborough in the middle of the Yorkshire Dales is a sort of cultural rite of passage. But in the 130 years or so since the original “Three Peaks” walk was devised, the troubling effects of its popularity – overcrowding, erosion and parking chaos – have reached near-crisis levels.

The Wharfedale Three Peaks, a high-level horseshoe around the top of glacier-gouged Upper Wharfedale, is a very worthy alternative, and of similar length and sternness. The “summits” of Birks Fell, Buckden Pike and Great Whernside (confusingly smaller than its namesake) are more like wide whaleback ridges, but you stay up in the sky for longer, and on a sunny day sinking a pint outside the White Lion at Cray, around the 10-mile mark, is a simple piece of paradise. By the end you will be tired, happy and saturated with wonder.

The Upper Wharfedale Fell and Rescue Association will run a marshalled Wharfedale Three Peaks challenge on 29 June, with the full 22-mile route, plus shorter options.

Skip Malham Cove and Gordale Scar
Give this a go instead Warrendale Knotts and Attermire Scar

Warrendale Knotts and Ribblesdale, between the town of Settle and Langcliffe village. Photograph: John Bentley/Alamy

This may not be “mountainous” territory in the strictest sense but the sublime karst architecture of the Yorkshire Dales can be as jaw-dropping as anything found at higher altitudes. The echoing enormity of Malham Cove is the world-famous A-lister, and neighbouring Gordale Scar gets its fair share of attention, too, as cars choking the fields and roads around Malham at weekends attest.

Nothing really comes close to the scale of Malham’s limestone spectacles but there are some remarkably overlooked gems around the Dales. Warrendale Knotts and Attermire Scar rise spectacularly from the folds of the landscape near Settle, their rippling layers of rock reflecting the ebb and flow of the tropical sea they were born in. And nearby Victoria Cave, where the bones of hippos, rhinos, elephants and hyenas were excavated in the 19th century, is another poignant location to contemplate lost worlds lying underfoot.

Peak District

The summit of Parkhouse Hill looking across to Chrome Hill in upper Dovedale. Photograph: Steve Taylor/Alamy

Skip Mam Tor and the Great Ridge
Give this a go instead Chrome Hill and Parkhouse Hill

Chrome Hill and Parkhouse Hill are what might happen if you took a pair of Alpine mountains, shrunk them to about a 20th of the size, and plonked them amid the green pastures of the White Peak. They are, rather mind-bendingly, the calcified remnants of huge coral reefs which existed in a teeming tropical sea about 330 million years ago – vividly illustrating the wonder of limestone formation – and their crags and slopes are a botanical treasure trove.

As mini-mountains with wide-ranging views, they make a fitting and far quieter alternative to Mam Tor and the Great Ridge – the sweeping edge separating Edale and the Hope Valley which is probably the most popular hill walk in the Peak District, which is in turn one of the most popular national parks in Britain. I would offer a word of warning, though: those who are sensitive to heights may find Parkhouse Hill packs quite a punch for its small size.

Snowdon

Sign and stone marker for top of the Watkin path. Photograph: Alamy

Skip Snowdon via the Llanberis, Pyg or Miner’s paths
Give this a go instead The Watkin Path

The previous descriptions of overcrowded hills are just a warm-up for Snowdon, which by the last count receives almost half a million visitors a year. Ascending via one of the popular paths, such as the Miner’s or Pyg, can sometimes feel like an exercise in queuing for the summit from the first step you take. Yet here as elsewhere, the honeypot effect is concentrated into a smallish area: even on a sunny bank holiday it is possible to climb Snowdon in relative peace. (Remember, though, that none of its paths will offer anything like perfect isolation, and the approach to the summit is always likely to be bedlam).

A few years ago, I would have hesitated to recommend the Watkin Path, with its idyllic series of pools and waterfalls near the start, because it involved a steep and rather scrappy final climb to Snowdon’s summit, but a new path has now been laid on key sections thanks to the British Mountaineering Council’s fundraising efforts. Descend to the south via Bwlch Main and Allt Maenderyn for a fantastic and lesser-trodden circuit.

Skip Tryfan and the Glyderau
Give this a go instead The Carneddau

The outlying Carneddau peak of Yr Elen. Photograph: Julian Cartwright/Alamy

The wind-ravaged tops of the Carneddau are a world apart: a series of wide, whale-backed mountain ridges that could easily be mistaken for Arctic tundra. Despite being the UK’s largest continuous expanse of high ground south of Scotland, the Carneddau are easily overlooked in favour of the more “glamorous” Glyderau, on the opposite side of the Ogwen valley, which entice walkers en masse with pulse-racing scrambles and bristling ridges. But in the great Carneddau, once you get up high on those roomy ridges you can stay high on them for hours, striding along in a lofty place – where ravens, dotterels and certainly sheep often outnumber people – soaking up the sheer joy of space. You can’t go wrong with the circuit of Pen yr Ole Wen, Carnedd Dafydd, Carnedd Llewelyn and Pen yr Helgi Du. The Carneddau even hide a lesser-known classic scramble, the Llech Ddu Spur – perfect for the adrenaline-seeker looking to dodge the crowds of the Glyderau.

Looking for a holiday with a difference? Browse Guardian Holidays to see a range of fantastic trips

A Selection of England’s best gardens

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Visit the grand gardens of England to see nature in harmony with heritage

Biddulph Grange Garden, Staffordshire

England has some of the finest gardens in the world, from dramatic historic landscapes designed by ‘Capability’ Brown to fragrant English rose gardens. Have a look through our selection and find the perfect garden for you to explore.

The Alnwick Garden, Northumberland

The Alnwick Garden, Northumberland

Designed by celebrated international garden designers Wirtz, and described by the Duchess of Northumberland as “an inspiring landscape with beautiful gardens, unique features all brought to life with water”, the Alnwick Garden is a magical playground. The garden brings joy to all who see it, from stunning spring blossoms to fragrant roses, there are striking water features and geometric ornamental gardens, including one of the largest collections of European plants. Visitors will delight in the roots and shoots vegetable garden, and learn all about planting. You can even stop to see the bees making honey. When you’re done exploring, stop off for lunch at the tree-top restaurant, located in one of the world’s largest wooden tree houses.

Find out more about The Alnwick Garden

Arley Hall & Gardens, Cheshire

Arley Hall & Gardens, Cheshire

Arley Hall and gardens is one of the finest gardens you will see, noted for its historical interest and the largest double herbaceous border in England. Explore the stunning gardens and take a walk in the informal grove where you’ll see more than 20 sculptures by local artists, including a life-size cow and her calf! Children can enjoy the adventure playground and willow dome den or even build their own with sticks.

Find out more about Arley Hall & Gardens

Belsay Hall, Castle and Gardens, Northumberland

Belsay Hall, Northumberland

Belsay Hall has been in the same family since the 13th century – owned by gardening enthusiast, Sir Charles Monck and his grandson Sir Arthur Middleton. The grade I registered heritage garden in Belsay Hall’s extensive grounds has been restored with a real attention to detail. Seasonal trees, shrubs, and flowers ensure brilliant colour throughout the year. Not to be missed is the dramatic quarry garden with its ravines, pinnacles and exotic plants.

Find out more about Belsay Hall

The Beth Chatto Gardens, Essex

The Beth Chatto Garden

Beth Chatto and her late husband, Andrew, have created a stunning garden from an old car park (it’s just 15 acres), using water-thrifty plants that will amaze and delight all who see it. A real hidden gem, the garden includes a water garden, woodland area, scree beds and gravel garden. The art of planting at its best.

Find out more about The Beth Chatto Gardens

Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire

Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire

Over 2,000 acres of ‘Capability’ Brown landscaped parkland, noted as “the most beautiful view in England”await you at Blenheim Palace. The Palace itself is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The award-winning formal gardens, commissioned by the 9th Duke of Marlborough, include a secret garden, majestic water terraces, a fragrant rose garden and a grand cascade and lake. Visitors can enjoy the Pleasure Gardens, or take a ride on the miniature train. Get lost in the giant maze, and once you’ve escaped, visit the tropical butterfly house for a splash of colour.

Find out more about Blenheim Palace

Burton Agnes Hall and Gardens, East Yorkshire

Burton Agnes Hall and Gardens

Set in the grounds of the magnificent Burton Agnes Hall, the award-winning Elizabethan gardens showcase over 4,000 different plants, a national collection of campanulas, and more than 100 yew topiary bushes. There is so much to explore, including a classical pond with a fountain and pebble mosaic garden, herbaceous borders and woodland walk including wildlife sculptures.

Find out more about Burton Agnes Hall and Gardens

Cambridge University Botanic Garden, Cambridge

Cambridge University Botanic Garden

Cambridge University Botanic Garden opened in 1846 by John Henslow, mentor to Charles Darwin and houses over 8,000 plants from around the world, including nine national plant collections and an arboretum. The garden has been designed to be visited throughout the year; highlights include the scented garden, buzzing bee borders and winter garden. Step inside the glasshouse to discover huge cacti, exotic plants and a tropical rainforest.

Find out more about Cambridge University Botanic Garden

Chatsworth, Derbyshire

Chatsworth, Derbyshire

An 18th century ‘Capability’ Brown garden set in the grounds of Chatsworth, home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. The garden is famous for its 200ft (61m) fountain, rock garden and surviving Joseph Paxton glasshouses, and contemporary sculptures. A great family day out, younger visitors can enjoy the maze, adventure playground and farmyard.

Find out more about Chatsworth

Chelsea Physic Garden, London

Chelsea Physic Garden, London

Located in a microclimate by the River Thames, the garden was founded in 1673 by the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries to train apprentices in the medicinal qualities of plants. It became one of the most important centres of botany and plant exchange in the world and has a unique collection of over 5,000 edible, useful, medicinal, and historical plants. This garden offers visitors a real sensory experience.

Find out more about Chelsea Physic Garden

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, London

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Kew Gardens, probably the world’s most famous garden, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The garden, created in 1759, boasts the earliest and greatest botanic garden, including breathtaking landscapes, historic buildings, along with one of the rarest and most interesting range of plants. Hop aboard the Kew Explorer land train to enjoy the 40-minute tour of the gardens and learn about Kew’s plants, trees and history.

Find out more about Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Kenilworth Castle and Elizabethan Garden, Warwickshire

Kenilworth Castle and Elizabethan Garden

Kenilworth is a faithful recreation of an Elizabethan garden which up until 2009 had been lost to the world, and is now managed by English Heritage. Visitors can follow in the footsteps of Queen Elizabeth I and experience the delights of this authentic Elizabethan garden, including carved arbours, a bejewelled aviary, and a marble fountain.

Find out more about Kenilworth Castle and Elizabethan Garden

Levens Hall, Cumbria

Levens Hall, Cumbria

World famous 17th century topiary gardens, designed by Monsieur Beaumont in 1694 with over 100 individual topiary pieces, some over nine metres high. Many of these towering topiary pieces are geometric shapes but look out for the chess pieces – King and Queen, the Judges Wig, the Howard Lion, the Great Umbrellas, Queen Elizabeth and her Maids of Honour, a Jug of Morocco Ale, and four Peacocks!

Find out more about Levens Hall

Stourhead, Wiltshire

Stourhead, Wiltshire

The vision of banker Henry Hoare, described as a “living work of art” when it first opened in the 1740s, Stourhead is now looked after by the National Trust. The gardens provide visitors an English 18th century view of a magical watery garden with stunning temples and follies at every turn, enhanced by a superb collection of plants and 19th century conifers.

Find out more about Stourhead

Stowe, Buckinghamshire

Stowe, Buckinghamshire

A picture-perfect English Garden attracting visitors for over 300 years. Stowe has fabulous views, lakes, and temples all joined up with winding paths in a timeless landscape. This garden is a significant example of the English garden style, one not to be missed.

Find out more about Stowe

Studley Royal Water Garden, North Yorkshire

Studley Royal Water Garden

Studley Royal Water Garden is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, looked after by the National Trust. A stunning 18th century water garden with ornamental lakes, mirror-like ponds, statues and follies, built around the romantic ruins of the 12th century Fountains Abbey. This garden has it all; green lawns stretch down to the riverside providing picture-perfect picnic spots, the riverside paths lead to the deer park, home to Red, Fallow and Sika deer, all surrounded by ancient trees.

Find out more about Studley Royal Water Garden

Tresco Abbey Garden, Isles of Scilly

Tresco Abbey Garden

Sub-tropical gardens are hidden on the Isles of Scilly, built by Lord Proprietor Augustus Smith in 1834. The tropical garden is set in 17 acres and the warm climate and location on a hillside ensure unusual exotic plants from all over the world are in plenty. This garden is unique. Follow the paths which cross the garden and discover towering palm trees, giant red flame trees, blue spires of echium and pink pelargonium. A visual treat for any visitor.

Find out more about Tresco Abbey Garden

OUR England is a garden that is full of stately views,
Of borders, beds and shrubberies and lawns and avenues,
With statues on the terraces and peacocks strutting by;
But the Glory of the Garden lies in more than meets the eye.
For where the old thick laurels grow, along the thin red wall,
You’ll find the tool- and potting-sheds which are the heart of all
The cold-frames and the hot-houses, the dung-pits and the tanks,
The rollers, carts, and drain-pipes, with the barrows and the planks.
And there you’ll see the gardeners, the men and ‘prentice boys
Told off to do as they are bid and do it without noise ;
For, except when seeds are planted and we shout to scare the birds,
The Glory of the Garden it abideth not in words.
And some can pot begonias and some can bud a rose,
And some are hardly fit to trust with anything that grows ;
But they can roll and trim the lawns and sift the sand and loam,
For the Glory of the Garden occupieth all who come.
Our England is a garden, and such gardens are not made
By singing:-” Oh, how beautiful,” and sitting in the shade
While better men than we go out and start their working lives
At grubbing weeds from gravel-paths with broken dinner-knives.
There’s not a pair of legs so thin, there’s not a head so thick,
There’s not a hand so weak and white, nor yet a heart so sick
But it can find some needful job that’s crying to be done,
For the Glory of the Garden glorifieth every one.
Then seek your job with thankfulness and work till further orders,
If it’s only netting strawberries or killing slugs on borders;
And when your back stops aching and your hands begin to harden,
You will find yourself a partner In the Glory of the Garden.
Oh, Adam was a gardener, and God who made him sees
That half a proper gardener’s work is done upon his knees,
So when your work is finished, you can wash your hands and pray
For the Glory of the Garden that it may not pass away!
And the Glory of the Garden it shall never pass away !

The following are sources from the Victorian Era that provide some insight into what meanings gardens were given in this period.

  • The Glory of the Garden , Rudyard Kipling

Our England is a garden that is full of stately views,
Of borders, beds and shrubberies and lawns and avenues,
With statues on the terraces and peacocks strutting by,
But the Glory of the Garden lies in more than meets the eye.

For where the old thick laurels grow, along the thin red wall,
You will find the tool- and potting-sheds which are the heart of all ;
The cold-frames and the hot-houses, the dungpits and the tanks:
The rollers, carts and drain-pipes, with the barrows and theplanks.

And there you’ll see the gardeners, the men and ‘prentice boys
Told off to do as they are bid and do it without noise;
For, except when seeds are planted and we shout to scare the birds,
The Glory of the Garden it abideth not in words.

And some can pot begonias and some can bud a rose,
And some are hardly fit to trust with anything that grows;
But they can roll and trim the lawns and sift the sand and loam,
For the Glory of the Garden occupieth all who come.

Our England is a garden, and such gardens are not made
By singing:–“Oh, how beautiful!” and sitting in the shade,
While better men than we go out and start their working lives
At grubbing weeds from gravel-paths with broken dinner-knives.

There’s not a pair of legs so thin, there’s not a head so thick,
There’s not a hand so weak and white, nor yet a heart so sick.
But it can find some needful job that’s crying to be done,
For the Glory of the Garden glorifieth every one.

Then seek your job with thankfulness and work till further orders,
If it’s only netting strawberries or killing slugs on borders;
And when your back stops aching and your hands begin to harden,
You will find yourself a partner in the Glory of the Garden.

Oh, Adam was a gardener, and God who made him sees
That half a proper gardener’s work is done upon his knees,
So when your work is finished, you can wash your hand and pray
For the Glory of the Garden, that it may not pass away!
And the Glory of the Garden it shall never pass away!
Back to Top

  • Gardens of England, E. T. Cook, 1903, p. 3

“There is a love of flowers fast knit into the very fibre of our British nature which probably lies at the root of the national reputation for gardening with which we are accredited.”

Back to Top

  • John Ruskin, 8 February 1870 (Helmreich, The English Garden and National Identity, 23)

“The England who is to be mistress of half the earth, cannot remain herself a heap of cinders… She must yet again become the England she was once, and in all beautiful ways – more: so happy, so secluded, and so pure… and in her fields, ordered and wide fair, of every herb that sips the dew; and under the green avenues of her enchanted garden, a sacred Circe, true Daughter of the Sun.”

Back to Top

  • Arthur Lee, Viscount Lee of Fareham (Helmreich, The English Garden and National Identity, 10)

“In January 1897, when serving in Canada, I was turning over the newly arrived English papers in the Montreal Club and was thrilled to come across a new weekly journal of which the outstanding feature, as it seemed to me, was an intoxicating array of temptations in the shape of English country houses… which were at the disposal of any homesick exile who could make a fortune overseas and retire to his native land.”

Back to Top

  • Dedication of Country Life, 1900 (Helmreich, The English Garden and National Identity, 225)

“All who are devoted to gardening, that love of flowers which seems ingrained in our national character, and which, in these days of unrest, or wars and rumours of wars, of fierce competition and striving for the mastery, has a soothing, refining influence, permeating to the nation’s advantage its home life. We are transforming ourselves into a nation of gardeners, and pleasant it is to see those in possession of many broad acres seeking horticulture as a pastime, and endeavouring to gain an intimate knowledge of that great world of flowers whose beauties are hidden to so many, a sealed book, which, when opened, reveals something of the great mysteries of Nature.”

Back to Top

  • The Spectator (Helmreich, The English Garden and National Identity, 69)

“A tangled wilderness of weeds conjures up a vision of a neglected wife and children, and a hard-earned wage wasted in wanton drink. While a gay garden plot – with herbs and rose bushes, sweet-peas running riot over bushes, covering them with their butterflies, white and red, and white and violet – betokens thrift and care and thoughtfulness.”
Back to Top

A Poem by Rudyard Kipling “The Glory of the Garden” and a Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom “Hydrangeas in a Blue Pot”

“Hydrangeas in a Blue Pot” Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom

I felt that this would be a good poem to compliment the paintings–both were composed in our garden. “Hydrangeas in a Blue Pot” was painted plein air (in the open air or outside), and “White Hydrangeas from Garden” was a still life from our garden. This arrangement was put together on our deck, and easel set up right then and there, and the glory of our garden was captured on canvas.

Hydrangeas are popular in English gardens, but for a time (20th century) people felt that they were old-fashioned, but they are now back in favor. We have always loved them in our Connecticut gardens. They always reminded me of the gardens on Cape Cod–we talk about heading out there so that Dan can paint the Cape. Hopefully, one of these days.

Rudyard Kipling, “The Glory of the Garden”

Our England is a garden that is full of stately views,
Of borders, beds and shrubberies and lawns and avenues

With statues on the terraces and peacocks strutting by;
But the Glory of the Garden lies in more than meets the eye.

For where the old thick laurels grow, along the thin red wall,
You will find the tool- and potting-sheds which are the heart of all ;
The cold-frames and the hot-houses, the dungpits and the tanks:
The rollers, carts and drain-pipes, with the barrows and the planks.

And there you’ll see the gardeners, the men and ‘prentice boys
Told off to do as they are bid and do it without noise;
For, except when seeds are planted and we shout to scare the birds,
The Glory of the Garden it abideth not in words.

And some can pot begonias and some can bud a rose,
And some are hardly fit to trust with anything that grows;
But they can roll and trim the lawns and sift the sand and loam,
For the Glory of the Garden occupieth all who come.

Our England is a garden, and such gardens are not made
By singing:–”Oh, how beautiful!” and sitting in the shade,
While better men than we go out and start their working lives
At grubbing weeds from gravel-paths with broken dinner-knives

There’s not a pair of legs so thin, there’s not a head so thick,
There’s not a hand so weak and white, nor yet a heart so sick.
But it can find some needful job that’s crying to be done,
For the Glory of the Garden glorifieth every one.

Then seek your job with thankfulness and work till further orders,
If it’s only netting strawberries or killing slugs on borders;
And when your back stops aching and your hands begin to harden,
You will find yourself a partner in the Glory of the Garden.

Oh, Adam was a gardener, and God who made him sees
That half a proper gardener’s work is done upon his knees,
So when your work is finished, you can wash your hand and pray
For the Glory of the Garden, that it may not pass away!
And the Glory of the Garden it shall never pass away!

“White Hydrangeas from Garden” Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom

Wishing you a good one!
Dan, the artist and Nancy, the blogger

RHS Garden Harlow Carr, Harrogate: Address, Phone Number, RHS Garden Harlow Carr Reviews: 4.5/5

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