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Greenhouses growing in popularity | Charlotte Observer

The gardening season never ends when you have a greenhouse: There’s always something growing on.

Greenhouses give warm-climate gardeners a chance to experiment with truly tropical plants year-round. In any climate, a greenhouse is the perfect place to get ahead of the calendar and start seeds and tend to transplants. Not surprisingly, gardeners thrive in a greenhouse environment, too.

“A lot of people just want to sit among their plants and do nothing, just enjoy it,” said Shelley Newman, vice president of Hartley Botanic, which has been making greenhouses in England since 1938.

Plant collectors used to be the main customers for greenhouses, said Charley Yaw, owner of Charley’s Greenhouse & Garden in Mount Vernon, Wash. Orchids, tender cacti and fancy flowers filled the shelves in these elaborate structures. Now, a large new generation of gardeners interested in starting seeds early and vegetable gardening in the offseason is making room in its backyards for hard-working greenhouses.

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“There are a ton more greenhouses being sold today than 20 years ago,” Yaw said. “And it doesn’t take a real expensive or sophisticated greenhouse to grow vegetables.”

Greenhouses can be just about any size, but the experts generally recommend a greenhouse with a footprint of about 8 feet by 10 feet. Yaw’s formula for customers is easy: “Figure out what you want, then add 50 percent,” he said.

If two people will be working in the greenhouse together, a 10-by-12-foot space allows more elbow room, Yaw said, and more growing space, too. Hartley Botanic’s most popular greenhouse size is 11 feet by 20 feet.

Building restrictions and setback limits may influence your decision, so it’s a good idea to check on local zoning and homeowner association regulations before you get started. Temporary structures may not be regulated.

Putting up a permanent greenhouse requires a bit of planning. You’ll have to consider the layout of your property and the relationship of the greenhouse to the rest of the garden and your home. It should be on the south side of your house to take best advantage of the light, and away from screening evergreen trees.

A path through the middle should be paved solidly to avoid muddy feet; gravel or pavers under the growing benches also help keep the greenhouse tidy. It’s practical to have a patio or pad of pavers, bricks or stone outside the greenhouse door; this area can also be used as a staging area for plants making the transition from the greenhouse to the garden.

Hartley Botanic’s greenhouses have glass panels, but not all greenhouses use glass. Plastic polycarbonate panels are popular, Yaw said, and the material is especially good insulation. Polycarbonate also diffuses the light, so plants do not get burned in bright sun.

Depending on where you live, an electric or gas heating system may be necessary, although passive heat will suffice on many days. Fans and automatic vents help prevent overheating.

Donna Clark, a retired garden designer in Greensboro, had a modest, hardworking greenhouse on the back of her two-car garage when she lived in Connecticut. When she and her husband moved south, her dream of a Hartley Botanic greenhouse came true. Her Victorian-style greenhouse is 11 feet by 10 feet, with a gravel floor. Shelves for plants line the sides, and a potting bench fits neatly against the back wall.

“Some people want a fancy car,” she said. “I wanted a fancy greenhouse.”

Clark grows annual flowers from seed in her greenhouse, nurturing the tiny plants before transplanting them into the garden; she also starts seeds for her extensive vegetable garden. Last year, she grew cucumbers in the greenhouse and harvested them long before cucumbers could have been produced outdoors. This winter, she is using her greenhouse as a studio, experimenting with mosaics.

Greenhouses are not an impulse purchase. Inexpensive do-it-yourself models start about $500 and run up to about $2,000. Larger greenhouses with more features are substantial structures and cost $5,000 or more. Hartley Botanic’s fancy Victorian greenhouse is quite an investment, at $45,000 to $50,000.

9 stylish greenhouses with porches

DESIGN SOURCEBOOK

Nine stylish ways to keep your beloved plants happy through the seasons – we look at greenhouses with porches.

Advertisement 1

SIZE MATTERS

Traditional Greenhouse (10m x 4m) and coldframes,
£35,760 (inc installation and base), Victorian Greenhouses,
Victorian Greenhouses

2

TRADITIONAL GREENHOUSE

Greenhouse with lobby,
£18,590 (inc installation; coldframes extra), WG Grace & Son,
WG Grace & Son

3

MAKE A GRAND ENTRANCE

Bespoke Victorian Lodge,
Price on application, Hartley Botanic,
Hartley Botanic

4

A MODERN CLASSIC

The Portico,
£11,995 (inc installation), Gabriel Ash,
Gabriel Ash

5

LEAN TO MODEL

Greenhouse with dormer porch,
£13,500 (inc installation), Dovetail Greenhouses,
Dovetail Greenhouses

6

HANDY DOUBLE DOORS

Kingsbury with integrated porch,
£10,500 (inc installation), Woodpecker Joinery,
Woodpecker Joinery

7

SMALL BUT PERFECTLY FORMED

The Croft,
£7,985 (inc installation), White Cottage Greenhouses,
White Cottage Greenhouses

8

NATIONAL TRUST COLLECTION

Mottisfont,
£13,750 (excluding brick base), Alitex,
Alitex

9

BESPOKE BEAUTY

Victorian Glasshouse,
£16,000 (inc installation), Griffin Glasshouses,
Griffin Glasshouses

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Prices correct at time of publication but check for updates. All companies mentioned here offer a range of greenhouses. Click through to their websites for full details.

Greenhouses Give You Room to Grow

The gardening season never ends when you have a greenhouse: There’s always something growing on.

A fancy greenhouse often is the fulfillment of a gardener’s dream and represents a considerable investment. This Hartley Botanic greenhouse at a designer’s weekend escape in Missouri is used to keep figs, citrus trees and other tender plants warm through the winter. It looks great all year round.
This 8-by-10-foot cedar Northern Heritage greenhouse from Charley’s Greenhouse & Garden has insulated polycarbonate roof and walls and a wide Dutch door. The greenhouse costs about $5,000 in this size, and comes with pre-cut and pre-drilled lumber. Once the foundation is prepared, it takes about three days to put it together, says Charley Yaw, owner of Charley’s Greenhouse.
Inside a working greenhouse, waist-high benches have plenty of room for plants in pots and for seed-starting equipment. A fan, a heater and a thermometer let the gardener monitor and control the temperature.
The Victorian Planthouse, made by Hartley Botanic, is about 9 by 11 feet with stone surround. The company’s most popular sized greenhouse is 11 by 20 feet and costs $45,000 to $50,000, including transportation and labor to install the greenhouse on a base supplied by the customer.
Hartley Botanic’s Grange greenhouse is about 11 by 11 feet, and more than 12 feet tall to the top of its pyramidal roof. The panels are all tempered safety glass, and the foundation walls are 2 1/2 feet tall.

Greenhouses give cold-climate gardeners the luxury of keeping their fingers in the dirt through the winter, and warm-climate gardeners a chance to experiment with truly tropical plants year-round. In any climate, a greenhouse is the perfect place to get ahead of the calendar and start seeds and tend to transplants. In a greenhouse, in the dead of winter, lemon blossoms perfume the air, basil and other tender herbs flourish, seedlings push happily up into the light and warmth. Not surprisingly, gardeners thrive in a greenhouse environment, too.

“A lot of people just want to sit among their plants and do nothing, just enjoy it,” says Shelley Newman, vice president of Hartley Botanic, which has been making greenhouses in England since 1938.

Plant collectors used to be the main customers for greenhouses, says Charley Yaw, owner of Charley’s Greenhouse & Garden in Mount Vernon, Wash. Orchids, tender cacti and fancy flowers filled the shelves in these elaborate structures. Now, a large new generation of gardeners interested in starting seeds early and vegetable gardening in the offseason is making room in its backyards for hard-working greenhouses.

“There are a ton more greenhouses being sold today than 20 years ago,” Yaw says. “And it doesn’t take a real expensive or sophisticated greenhouse to grow vegetables.”

Greenhouses can be just about any size, but the experts generally recommend a greenhouse with a footprint of about 8 by 10 feet. Yaw’s formula for customers is easy: “Figure out what you want, then add 50 percent,” he says. If two people will be working in the greenhouse together, a 10-by-12-foot space allows more elbow room, Yaw says, and more growing space, too. Newman recommends an even larger size for real enthusiasts; Hartley Botanic’s most popular greenhouse size is 11 by 20 feet. “I’ll tell you this,” she says. “Everybody underbuys.”

Building restrictions and setback limits may influence your decision, so it’s a good idea to check on local zoning regulations before you get started. Temporary structures may not be regulated. Barbara Damrosch and Eliot Coleman, owners of Four Season Farm in Maine, rely on temporary 10-by-12-foot hoop-top greenhouses placed right on top of the soil to extend the seasons in their vegetable gardens.

Putting up a permanent greenhouse requires a bit of planning. You want it to look nice in your garden. You’ll have to consider the layout of your property and the relationship of the greenhouse to the rest of the garden and your home. It should be on the south side of your house to take best advantage of the light, and away from screening evergreen trees.

A path through the middle should be paved solidly, to avoid muddy feet; gravel or pavers under the growing benches also help keep the greenhouse tidy. It’s practical to have a patio or pad of pavers, bricks or stone outside the greenhouse door; this area can also be used as a staging area for plants making the transition from the greenhouse to the garden.

Hartley Botanic’s greenhouses have glass panels, but not all greenhouses use glass. Plastic polycarbonate panels are popular, Yaw says, and the material is especially good insulation. Polycarbonate also diffuses the light, so plants do not get burned in bright sun.

Depending on where you live, an electric or gas heating system may be necessary, although passive heat will suffice on many days. Fans and automatic vents help prevent overheating.

Donna Clark, a retired garden designer in Greensboro, N.C., had a modest, hardworking greenhouse on the back of her two-car garage when she lived in Connecticut. When she and her husband sold their house and moved south, her dream of a Hartley Botanic greenhouse came true. Her Victorian-style greenhouse is just 11 by 10 feet, with a gravel floor. Shelves for plants line the sides, and a potting bench fits neatly against the back wall. “Some people want a fancy car,” she says. “I wanted a fancy greenhouse.”

Clark grows annual flowers from seed in her greenhouse, nurturing the tiny plants before transplanting them into the garden; she also starts seeds for her extensive vegetable garden. Last year, she grew cucumbers in the greenhouse, and harvested them long before cucumbers could have been produced in the garden outdoors. This winter, she is using her greenhouse as a studio experimenting with mosaics.

Greenhouses are not an impulse purchase. Inexpensive do-it-yourself models start at about $500 and run up to about $2,000. Larger greenhouses with more features are substantial structures and cost $5,000 or more. Hartley Botanic’s fancy Victorian greenhouse is quite an investment, at $45,000 to $50,000.

The winter months are the perfect time to be considering a greenhouse. Some models are on sale, and if you get started now, you can have plans in place so that construction can proceed quickly, whenever the weather allows. You’ll be out there with seed packets in hand, long before the gardening season begins for everybody else.

SOURCES

— Charley’s Greenhouse & Garden; www.charleysgreenhouse.com

— Gardener’s Supply Co.; www.gardeners.com

— Hartley Botanic; www.hartley-botanic.com

— Growers Supply; www.growerssupply.com

(For editorial questions, please contact Clint Hooker at [email protected] or the Universal Uclick Editorial Department at [email protected])

Heritage Greenhouses

Aluminium greenhouses for sale

There are many things that you can grow inside a walk in greenhouse, but one thing that no one has mastered yet, is growing money! That’s why when buying a greenhouse it’s important to get it right first time, as it’s an important decision. The choice of greenhouses can be truly overwhelming, especially with many low quality products on the market it can be a daunting time for many. At Hartley we rely on the reputation of our greenhouses, and the quality of our service. If you are new to Hartley Botanic, we strongly recommend that you extensively compare our models with comparable greenhouse companies.

And while we cannot grow money in greenhouses, once you have researched and compared, you will have the confidence to invest in a Hartley Botanic greenhouse. This is why we believe that we manufacture the finest greenhouses that your money can buy.

What to consider when choosing a greenhouse:

  • The greenhouse design and its originality
  • The true differences in construction
  • Like for like specification and technical details such as manufacturing methods, mechanical joints information, glazing system details, factory pre-assembly, and quality of materials used
  • The accessories you might like within your greenhouse

Further information about greenhouses:

  • Why choose an aluminium greenhouse?
  • What technical features you require in your greenhouse?
  • How much power will you need in the greenhouse?
  • What greenhouse colours are available?

Hartley Botanic

Hartley Botanic is an English Greenhouse and Glasshouse manufacturer based in Greenfield, Lancashire. The company was founded in 1938 by brothers Vincent (RHS fellow) and Norman Hartley following their groundbreaking aluminium Greenhouse design, the first time aluminium had been used in Greenhouse construction and marking a huge improvement on its wood and wrought iron Victorian forerunners.

Today, Hartley Botanic’s reputation is beyond compare and has been built on over 80 years of English craftsmanship, creating the finest Greenhouses and Glasshouses money can buy which are known for their beauty, elegance and structural superiority. The manufacturer offers an incomparable range of Greenhouses and Glasshouses, meaning they can create designs that are distinctive and unique. They have unrivalled knowledge and expertise, which generations of customers have put their trust in, and offer an exceptional delivery of service.

Hartley Botanic is the Greenhouse manufacturer of choice for leading horticulture organisations, institutions and designers in the UK and worldwide with commissions from the RHS, the National Trust, Kew Gardens, Glasgow Botanic Gardens, Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Oxford Botanical Gardens, Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons, Blenheim Palace, The Lingholm Estate and Hampton Court Palace…to name a few.

In February 2017 Hartley Botanic became the only aluminium Greenhouse and Glasshouse manufacturer to be endorsed by the RHS.

All Hartley Botanic’s Greenhouses and Glasshouses are handmade, bespoke and made to order. Customers interested in purchasing a Hartley Botanic Greenhouse should visit: http://www.hartley-botanic.co.uk or call 01457 819 155 for more information.

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