Heartleaf Philodendron Grow And Care Tips

How to grow and care heartleaf Philidendron?

Heartleaf Philodendron or commonly called Philodendron cordatum because of its 2-4 inch heart-shaped leaves. Heart Leaf Philodendron is an epiphytic and epilithic species of Philodendron. This Philodendron endemic to southeastern Brazil. Heart Leaf Philodendron is typically a vining plant that can tolerate shade. Despite of its toxicity (similar to other Philodendrons) ,this Philodendron is popular as a houseplant in temperate regions.

Heartleaf philodendron as indoor plant

Heartleaf philodendrons are often grown in hanging baskets which allow the thin stems and heart-shaped leaves to beautifully spill out of their container.

When heartleaf philodendron grown in a container indoor its can be displayed as a specimen plant on a table, shelf, or wall bracket, where the long, trailing vines of the plant can have room to spread. They can also be trained to climb up a screen, trellis, pole, or a bark board.

Heartleaf philodendron as outdoor plants

For those in warmer climates (USDA hardiness zones 10B through 11).did you know that this philodendron can also be grown outside for completely different results.

Outdoor heartleaf philodendrons can be used as a groundcover. Heartleaf philodendron will quickly provide a dark green carpet in shady areas. When allowed to grow up trees or other vertical supports leaves can grow quite large, reaching 12 inches or more in length.

However when Indoors, the growth of your heartleaf philodendron will be dependent on the height of their support, training, and pruning.

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Heartleaf philodendron grow and care tips

POTTING MIX
Philodendrons do best in loose, well-drained soil that is high in organic matter. They will grow in 100% sphagnum peat moss. Soilless mixtures such as peat-vermiculite or peat-perlite are also satisfactory.

WATER
When growing philodendron plants, allow the top inch of soil to dry out between waterings. The length of your index finger to the first knuckle is about an inch, so inserting your finger into the soil is a good way to check the moisture level. Droopy leaves can mean that the plant is getting too much or not enough water. But the leaves recover quickly when you correct the watering schedule.

SUNLIGHT
Set the Philodendron in a location with bright, indirect sunlight. Find a position near a window where the sun’s rays never actually touch the foliage. While it’s normal for older leaves to yellow, if this happens to several leaves at the same time, the plant may be getting too much light. On the other hand, if the stems are long and leggy with several inches between leaves, the plant probably isn’t getting enough light

FERTILIZER
Feed philodendron houseplants with a balanced liquid foliage houseplant fertilizer that contains macro-nutrients. Water the plant with the fertilizer monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter. Slow growth and small leaf size is the plant’s way of telling you that it isn’t getting enough fertilizer. Pale new leaves usually indicate that the plant isn’t getting enough calcium and magnesium, which are essential micro-nutrients for philodendrons.

TEMPERATURE
The ideal temperature for a philodendron is between 65 – 78°F during the day, and around 60°F at night.

TOXICITY
Philodendron should not be consumed by animals or humans. Lacy tree philodendrons are toxic to cats and dogs. Being educated on poisonous plants can help you avoid any accidents all the while enjoying your greenery.

PEST PROBLEMS
Philodendron are not prone to insects, but you may encounter aphids and mealybugs. You can wipe off mealybugs with cotton balls dipped in rubbing alcohol. Periodically showering the plant with water and applying insecticidal soap will help keep pests at bay.

When to repot your Heartleaf philodendron?

It will thrive in a small pot for years with little care. Repot every 2-3 years, in spring or early summer. Use a container with drainage holes to prevent root rot.

If you want to use a decorative container without drainage, use it as a cachepot. Just slip your plain nursery pot into the cachepot. I like to cover the bottom of a cachepot with pebbles to keep the philodendron plant above the drainage water.

do you need more information about repotting philodendron plant? read here

How to pinch your Heartleaf philodendron?

Without pinching, this philodendron will grow with long, single stems and become lanky. You can pinch it back anytime to help it branch out hence it will make the Philodendron bushy and full. Always pinch after a leaf node (the place where a leaf is attached to the stem). A new stem will grow from that node.

apart from that you also can prune your philodendron plant.For more information about pruning your philodendron you can read here

Pinching tip: Try to pinch close to the node because any bare stem that is left will die, and the node will not grow a new stem. Make a clean cut — avoid jagged tears, which can attract disease. You can use your fingernails to pinch, or use sharp scissors or pruners

Besides that you can let it grow. Few house plants are as eager to climb as a heartleaf philodendron. If you allow the long stems to grow, put the plant in a hanging basket. Apart from that you also can let it trail from a shelf or bookcase. To train it to climb a moss pole, use floral tape to hold the stems up to the pole, until its aerial roots sink in

Despite its tropical origins, this beautiful evergreen philodendron plant is tolerant of dry air, although it appreciates occasional misting. Keep its leaves clean by wiping them with a damp cloth

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SummaryArticle Name Heartleaf Philodendron Grow And Care Tips Description Outdoor heartleaf philodendrons can be used as a ground cover. Heartleaf philodendron will quickly provide a dark green carpet in shady areas. Author Philodendron Lover Publisher Name philodendron plant Publisher Logo

Philodendron scandens

The Philodendron scandens is native to Mexico, Brazil and the West Indies and is one of the most common and popular species of Philodendron sold today. It is part of the Aracae family and is known as a vine and climber due to its ability to grow to huge heights given the right conditions. These plants are naturally found in humid tropical rainforests but they are also found in swamps and river banks.

Due to their climbing nature they climb tree trunks and other plants in their natural habitat. The leaves have a pointy tip and have a brown tint to them, however, they rapidly turn to a lush deep green color as they mature.

It is a versatile plant that can be grown in a number of different conditions which makes it perfect for both outdoor growing and indoor growing. This is a plant that has caused much discussion over its name, a discussion which has last for around 200 years. It is also known as Philodendron Oxycardium and Philodendron Cordatum, the varied names are down to the fact that it has a diverse habitat.

Foliage: This is a plant that can gain some incredible height but it is really known for its heart shaped leaves. The leaves can take on a number of different colors but in the main they become a dark and glossy green color but they can almost look transparent at times.

The leaves can grow up to a length of 10 inches whilst its stems have the ability to grow to 4ft long or more but it can take up to ten years to reach its ultimate height. Its foliage remains green all year round making it the perfect evergreen plant for both the home and garden.

Flowering: This is not a plant that is particularly known for its stunning flowers but it does occasionally produce spathes of white flowers especially on mature plants. The flowers on this plant can appear at any time of the year but mainly in summer but it is common for those plants that are kept indoors to not flower. Whilst it is called a flower, the spathe that this plant produces is more like a flower holder and is a green color and oval in shape.

Displaying and growing: The Heart leaf can be grown as a trailer or climber plant. To grow as a trailer pinch out the stem tips and allow the plant to grow bushy in appearance.

Growing as a climber involves using a moss stick for the plant to attach to and climb. This in my opinion is the best way to grow and much more fun.

Heart Leaf Philodendron (Philodendron Hederaceum)

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May 1, 2019Long, trailing vines of the Heart Leaf Philodendron in our Aqua Splash Riverstone Hanging Planters (Large Left and Small Right).

Throughout human history the heart has symbolised many things, but above all it has symbolised love. Our capacity for love may very well be our greatest attribute. And we here at A & C love, love, love the Heartleaf Philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum). With its deep-green, heart-shaped leaves, this Philodendron is a beauty. Heartleaf Philodendrons are also super easy to care for and almost impossible to kill. And, as an added bonus to their good looks, Heartleaf Philodendron Plants are great at removing air-born toxins such as formaldehyde.

Check out those hearts!

Environment & Light:

Just like Mogwai from Gremlins, make sure to keep Heartshaped Philodendrons out of direct sunlight – they will burn. Medium or bright indirect light is your best bet, however your Heartshaped Philo will tolerate lowlight conditions.

Temperatures between 24-27 degrees Celcius during the day and 13 degrees Celsius in the evening will provide the best environment for your plant to thrive.

Such a fantastic, deep green. Image by Little Plant Co.

Soil:

Use a quick draining, well-aerated potting soil.

Watering:

Give your plant a good soaking and then allow the top half of the soil to dry out before watering again.

Yellow leaves indicate over-watering and brown leaves mean that your plant needs more water.

Pests & Disease:

Aphids, Spider Mites, Mealy Bugs, Thrip, and Scale are the main culprits of infestation. The main disease issue is root-rot from overwatering.

All Philodendron plants are poisonous, so please make sure to keep them up and away from little hands or where your much-loved pets might get at them.

To make your Heart Leaf Philodendron more ‘bushy’ in appearance, take cuttings from longer vines and plant them back into the pot or hanging planter. Pictured here with our Riverstone Hanging Planters in Large Aqua Half Moon, Small Aqua Splash and Large Aqua Splash.

Propagation:

Heartleaf Philodendrons are quite easy to propagate using stem cuttings. Ensure that the cutting has four or five nubs on it. Nubs are the small bumps where the leaves meet the stem. This is where roots will eventually grow from.

Water propagation of the Heart Leaf Philodendron. Image From Young House Love.

Did you know?

NASA lists the Heartleaf Philodendron as a clean-air plant. Be still my beating heart! How can you not love this plant?

The new leaves on the Heart Leaf Philodendron start as pink! Pictured here in our Riverstone Hanging Planters in Half Moon.

Heartleaf Philodendron

Botanical Name: Philodendron scandens

Heartleaf philodendron is a popular house plant because it is extremely easy to grow. It’s also known as the Sweetheart Plant.

Heart-shaped, glossy leaves emerge bronze, then quickly turn green. The leaves are typically 2-4 in (5-10 cm) long, and cover its long, slender stems that can grow to 4 ft (1.2 m) or more.

Pinch your plant. Without pinching, it will grow with long, single stems and become lanky. You can pinch it back anytime to help it branch out, keeping the plant bushy and full. Always pinch after a leaf node (the place where a leaf is attached to the stem). A new stem will grow from that node.

Pinching tip: Try to pinch close to the node because any bare stem that is left will die, and the node will not grow a new stem. Make a clean cut — you want to avoid jagged tears, which can attract disease. You can use your fingernails to pinch, or use sharp scissors or pruners.

Or let it grow. Few house plants are as eager to climb as a heartleaf philodendron. If you allow the long stems to grow, put the plant in a hanging basket, or let it trail from a shelf or bookcase. To train it to climb a moss pole, use floral tape or soft plant ties to hold the stems up to the pole, until its aerial roots sink in.

It will thrive in a small pot for a couple years with little care. Despite its tropical origins, this beautiful evergreen plant is tolerant of dry air, although it appreciates occasional misting. Keep its leaves clean by wiping them with a damp cloth.

Wondering whether to repot? It’s definitely time to repot every 2-3 years, in spring or early summer. Use a container with drainage holes to prevent root rot. If you want to use a decorative container without drainage, use it as a cachepot — just slip your plain nursery pot into the cachepot. I like to cover the bottom of a cachepot with pebbles to keep the plant above the drainage water.

Problems and Solutions for Heartleaf Philodendron

Wilted leaves are likely because the potting medium has dried out. Although it will tolerate dry soil, I wouldn’t let it go too long without a drink. Another possibility for wilting is root rot.

Yellow leaves are caused by prolonged soggy soil. Overwatering is the number one reason houseplants die. But it’s easy to avoid. Use a pot with drainage holes, water thoroughly then empty the drainage tray.

Brown scorch marks on leaves may be a symptom of exposure to hot, direct sunlight. Or brown spots may be caused by fungus. If you mist your plant, or clean it with water, don’t allow water drops to stay on the leaves. While foliage dries quickly outdoors with good air circulation, indoor plants may stay wet for several hours, leading to fungus. It’s a good idea to cut off affected leaves. Don’t worry — this vigorous vine will soon replace them.

Something bugging your plant? The only problem I’ve had with this easy-going philodendron is fungus gnats. Those tiny, black insects are attracted to wet, peaty potting mixes. They’re difficult to see, but you may find them crawling on the surface. This plant is somewhat drought-tolerant, so I allowed the top couple inches of potting medium to dry out and the fungus gnats disappeared. Aphids are attracted to new growth on soft-stemmed plants, like this one. Treat any infestation right away to avoid pests from traveling on to your other indoor plants.

Heartleaf Philodendron Care Tips

Origin: South America

Height: Climbs or trails to 4 ft (1.2 m) or more.

Light: Moderate to bright light. Small leaves or long spaces between leaves show that the plant is not getting enough light. Move your philodendron plant to a brighter location, but not into direct sun which can scorch its leaves. It thrives under fluorescent light, too, making it an ideal office plant.

Water: Keep soil lightly moist spring through fall. Allow surface to dry out between waterings in winter. Yellow leaves are caused by overwatering. Always use tepid water for your houseplants because cold water is a shock to these tropical natives.

Humidity: Tolerant of dry air, but likes humidity. Try to maintain 40% relative humidity or higher. Check out these easy ways to raise the humidity around your tropical plants. Brown leaf tips are a symptom of dry air.

Temperature: Average room temperatures (65-75°F/18-24°C). Heartleaf philodendron will tolerate a minimum of 60°F/16°C.

Soil: Peat moss-based mix, such as African violet potting mix.

Fertilizer: Feed monthly spring through fall with a balanced liquid or water-soluble fertilizer, diluted by half. Don’t feed in winter, when growth is slower.

Propagation: Take 3-4 in/7-10 cm-long stem tip cuttings (each with at least 3 leaves attached) in spring or early summer. Cut just below a leaf node (the place where the leaf is attached to the stem). Nodes contain cells that will develop new roots. Philodendron roots easily in water or moist soil.

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Heart-leaf Philodendron

If you’re looking for a fool-proof house plant, you couldn’t do much better than a heart-leaf philodendron. These easy-growing foliage plants thrive with indirect light and very little maintenance.

Heart-leaf philodendrons are often grown in hanging baskets which allow the thin stems and heart-shaped leaves to beautifully spill out of their container.

Characteristics

Heart-leaf philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum var. oxycardium) are a vining type of philodendron with dark green heart-shaped leaves, generally 2–4 inches in size.

Grown in a container indoors, heart-leaf philodendrons can be displayed as a specimen plant on a table, shelf, or wall bracket, where the long, trailing vines of the plant can have room to spread. They can also be trained to climb up a screen, trellis, pole, or a bark board.

For those in warmer climates (USDA hardiness zones 10B through 11) heart-leaf philodendron can also be grown outside for completely different results. As a groundcover, heart-leaf philodendron will quickly provide a dark green carpet in shady areas. When allowed to grow up trees or other vertical supports leaves can grow quite large, reaching 12 inches or more in length. Indoors, the growth of your heart-leaf philodendron will be dependent on the height of their support, training, and pruning.

If you have pets in the house, make sure your heart-leaf philodendron is place where curious paws will not be able to get to it. Philodendrons are toxic to pets; chewing on plants can cause oral pain, drooling, foaming, vomiting, and moderate to severe swelling of the lips, tongue, oral cavity, and upper airway. People can also have mild allergic reactions to the sap, resulting in an itchy rash.

Planting and Care

Philodendrons are versatile and hardy plants, and are generally easy to care for in your home. Heart-leaf philodendrons enjoy bright diffuse light, but will tolerate a range of lighting conditions from diffused light to shade; just avoid direct sunlight as this can burn the leaves.

One of the reasons heart-leaf philodendron does so well indoors is that it prefers the same temperature range as we do; temperatures below 50°F are too cool for this particular plant.

Water your philodendron when the top inch of soil becomes dry to the touch. Using a light weight, well-drained potting media will help ensure that your plant does not become too wet or water logged. While philodendrons prefer high humidity, they are capable of tolerating the low humidity levels of a typical household. Fertilize your philodendron every 3-4 months to keep your plant looking great.

While philodendrons are easy to maintain, too much water or too little light can cause yellowing leaves, and too much fertilizer can cause the leaf tips of your plant to brown and curl. Although generally pest free, they have been known to be infested by aphids, mealy bugs, scales, and spidermites.

Heart-leaf philodendron is also very easy to propagate; you can start new plants for yourself or to share by planting short stem cuttings in clean potting media. This versatile, easy-to-grow plant is a great way for both novices and seasoned gardeners to bring the outdoors in.

  • Heart-leaf philodendron is the plant of the month for February. See other featured plants.

UF/IFAS Sites

  • Florida Plant ID: Heart-leaf Philodendron

UF/IFAS Publications

  • Philodendron scandens Heart Leaf Philodendron

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