Herb Robert Control – How To Get Rid Of Herb Robert Geranium Plants

Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum) has an even more colorful name, Stinky Bob. What is Herb Robert? It is an attractive herb that was once sold in nurseries as an ornamental plant and used as a medicinal in simpler times. However, Herb Robert geranium is now a Class B noxious herb in Washington and Oregon. It has the ability to spread and take over native habitat quickly and prolifically. Fortunately, Herb Robert control is easy and non-toxic, although a bit tedious and time consuming. This article goes over Herb Robert identification so you can stop the spread of this potentially damaging plant.

What is Herb Robert?

Invasive weeds form a common battlefield for the gardener. Herb Robert is in the geranium family and produces the characteristic crane-shaped seed pod that all members of the family bear. The seeds eject forcefully from the pod and can travel up to 20 feet away from the plant, making it a virtual nuisance. The seeds are not the only problem because Herb Robert growing conditions are flexible such that the weed is

adaptable to most soil and site conditions.

It is unclear as to whether Herb Robert geranium is native to North America or if it was delivered here by settlers and colonizers. Either way, the plant is now widely spread across the Northwest and B.C. but present only lightly down into California. The rapid spread and ease of establishment are a threat to the local flora.

Sticky fibers on the seeds attach to animals, people and machinery to travel and establish in new regions. It was once used to treat toothaches and fever, but those beneficial traits have been buried by the explosion of plants in certain regions.

Herb Robert Identification

The weed is actually quite pretty with lacy, deeply defined leaves and pleasant 5-petaled pink flowers. The flower becomes a beak-like pod filled with many tiny black seeds. It grows low to the ground and may be found hiding under desired plants. In forests, it forms dense mats of interlocking leaves and rosette plants. The leaves and stems are covered with sticky hairs that give off a strange smell, leading to the name Stinky Bob.

Herb Robert Control

Forests, ditches, disturbed soil, garden beds, low mountain terrain and almost any other location provide ideal Herb Robert growing conditions. It prefers well-drained soil but can survive in slightly boggy areas as well. The weed has a very short and branching root system. This means hand pulling is easy and effective.

You can also mow the plants if you can get to them before they flower and seed. It is best to send the weeds to the county composting facility, as most home compost units do not get hot enough to kill seeds. Use organic mulch to control any seedlings and prevent germination.

Herb Robert geranium may look innocent enough, but it has the ability to get out of control and populate areas of commercial and native vegetation. Close your eyes to its sweet fern-like leaves and pink to white delicate flowers and pull.

Luontoportti

  • Written also: Herb-Robert
  • Family: Geranium Family – Geraniaceae
  • Growing form: Annual or often biennial herb. Taproot many-branched.
  • Height: 15–40 cm (6–16 in.). Stem many-branched, with spreading hairs, usually red.
  • Flower: Regular (actinomorphic), 15–20 mm (0.6–0.8 in.) broad. Petals 5, dark rose-red, with paler veins, round-tipped. Sepals 5, with broadly membranous margins, glossy, long-haired, sharp-pointed, erect, around half shorter than petals. Stamens 10. Pistil of 5 used carpels. Flowers usually axillary in pairs or terminating stems.
  • Leaves: In basal rosette and on stem opposite. Rosette leaves long-stalked, stem leaves stalked–almost stalkless, stipulate. Blade triangular, with palmate venation, with 3 leaflets (basal leaves sometimes with 5 leaflets), central leaflet long-stalked, leaflets pinnate–deeply lobed; lobes narrow, sharp-tipped.
  • Fruit: 5-parted schizocarp, tip beak-like, coiling up when ripe. Mericarps with net-like surface, sparsely haired.
  • Habitat: Mossy boulders in lush woods, rocky places, walls, rocky outcrops, hedgerows, seashores.
  • Flowering time: June–September.

If herb Robert is touched, its fragrance gives it away as a geranium (Pelargonium), a familiar group of house plants from South Africa. They emit a fragrance, especially upon being touched, which is intended to put potential predatory plant-eaters off their food. At least a certain percentage of people find the smell unpleasant. The smelly liquid that is acquired by boiling the plant is used in Finland to get rid of bugs and also to treat wounds. Its flowers are a deep rose-red and in light places the whole plant is often crimson, which is the same colour that it is in the autumn. Herb Robert grows relatively rarely in open places; it is more likely to be found in shady broad-leaved forests on rocky places and in crevices, where at least a small, spongy, nitrogenous build-up of leaves has occurred.

Many cranesbills spread by flinging their seeds out with the help of the flexible outer wall of the tips of their carpels. Herb Robert on the other hand relies on two white bristles that are deeply lobed at the tip and which reveal themselves only when the tip breaks away from the fruit. These fibres easily attach to passing people and animals, and can thus travel long distances. The species can also be met as a casual alien outside its clearly established habitat. If they can’t find a suitable ride the seeds attach to the plant’s own leaves and stem until the rotten carpel’s wall breaks and the seed falls to the plant’s roots.

Other species from the same genus
Other species from the same family

Follow us!

Washington State

Geranium robertianum

Family: Geraniaceae

Other Common Names: Robert geranium, stinky Bob
Weed class: B
Year Listed: 1998
Native to: Europe, Asia and Northern Africa
Is this Weed Toxic?:

not known to be

Why Is It a Noxious Weed?

It poses a threat to the forest understory and to plant diversity in the forests of Western Washington. It is capable of growing under a full, closed canopy. Where it occurs, there appears to be fewer native herbaceous species.

How would I identify it?

General Description

Herb Robert is both a winter and a spring annual or bienennial. It is a low growing plant that is hairy and shallowly rooted. Plants have a pungent odor when crushed.

Flower Description

Flowers have 5 pink petals.

Leaf description

The leaves are deeply dissected and light green. The foliage turns red in late fall.

Stem description

The stems are upright to spreading, hairy and turn red in high light conditions.

Fruit Seed Description

The fruit is a capsule. Seeds are brown and about 2 mm in length.

Where does it grow?

Herb Robert is highly adaptable. It is found in moist forests with canopy closure and on dry rocky outcrops. It is also becoming a significant garden pest in some areas. It is found from sea level to mid-mountainous areas in both the Cascades and Olympics. Please click here to see a county level distribution map of herb-Robert in Washington.

How Does it Reproduce?

Herb Robert reproduces by seeds. The seeds are ejected in response to drying of the capsule. Reports indicate that they may be ejected as far as 15 to 20 feet from the mother plant.

How Do I Control It?

General Control Strategy

Herb Robert is fairly easy to hand pull. Herbicide is also generally effective.

Mechanical Control

Herb Robert has a very shallow, weak root system which makes hand pulling easy. Mowing also keeps it under control if done early in the season.

Herbicide Control

Please refer to the PNW Weed Management Handbook, or contact your county noxious weed coordinator.

For More Information

See our Written Findings for more information about herb-Robert (Geranium robertianum).

Clallam County NWCB Fact Sheet on herb-Robert

Jefferson County NWCB Fact Sheet on herb-Robert

Mason County NWCB Fact Sheet on herb-Robert

Whatcom County NWCB Fact Sheet on herb-Robert

San Juan County NWCB Brochure on herb-Robert

Control Options for herb-Robert from King County NWCB

Control Options for herb-Robert from Whatcom County NWCB

ORNAMENTALS: That English Ivy and Stinky Bob ride again

Sun |

— Apr 17th, 1998

They’re the Bonnie and Clyde of weeds — outlaws of the Northwest plant kingdom. From my letters, e-mail and conversations, it’s obvious that English ivy and herb Robert (Stinky Bob) continue to trespass in your neighborhood.

Let’s recap for those who may have missed my columns on these pests. English ivy and Geranium robertianum (herb Robert) were probably introduced in the Northwest from Europe. Where they naturalize and thrive, herbaceous native plants cannot grow. Herb Robert looks like a little pink geranium and smells like a foot. English ivy is especially bad when climbing trees; as a vertical vine, it fruits and then birds spread the seed for miles. Among other problems, the weight of ivy, especially when wet or frozen, may cause a tree to topple.

First, Stinky Bob

JoAnne Johnson of Bremerton writes: “I loved your article in The Sun about the Robert’s geranium. Our two acres were free of this plant until my husband found one along side the road while he was walking and brought it home. I hope he’s learned his lesson! Our property is now covered and we’re in the process of trying to get rid of it. I call it ‘Dread Pirate Robert’s Geranium.’ “

Joanne, tell your husband not to feel bad — I actually tried to plant herb Robert around the garden! Read on.

Jean Lytle of Bremerton also sent a letter: “Jan, thanks for your informative article about ‘Stinky Bob.’ Unfortunately, it has come on to my back lot from a neighbor about two years ago. At first I wasn’t concerned. Now I’m attacking it with a vengeance and seriously doubt if I can keep it from going into the woods.

“Some questions: Does it only reproduce by seed? When do the seeds pop out? After the pink flower is gone? When I pull it — pre-flower — is it OK to put it in the compost?”

On the posse to remove any invasive weed from circulation is Christina Pfeiffer, horticulturist at Seattle’s Washington Park Arboretum. She starts by answering Lytle’s question:

“Herb Robert does reproduce by seed — prolifically. The seeds mature after the flowers have dried up, typically from late June through fall. Under moist conditions, it will continue to flower all summer. The seeds are shot out as the seed head dries out, and the seeds cling to overhead shrubbery until they are washed down by fall rains. They germinate in the fall, waiting for spring warmth to explode into growth. If moisture is available, they seem to germinate in all but the very coldest months & It is fine to compost herb Robert before it develops seeds.”

Steve Talkington, at the Group Health Lab in Poulsbo, wanted to know more about control of herb Robert; for example, if Casoron is OK to use.

Replies Christina Pfeiffer: “If all other conditions are appropriate for the use of Casoron, it will also control herb Robert. Milder pre-emergent herbicides such as Treflan are just as effective. As with all pesticides, follow label directions carefully.”

Et tu, Ivy?

Dave Ojima of Illahee sent a wistful e-mail, hoping to get permission to keep the beautiful ivy on his cedar tree. After some correspondence, he changed his tune: “I liked the article you wrote on ivy and have a question I hope you can help answer for me. I now have a large cedar tree, about 2 feet in diameter and about 80 feet tall, where the ivy has grown about 20 feet up the trunk. Your article says ivy may harm trees & Do you think ivy will harm a large tree like this and that I should cut it? It would be fairly easy to cut the stems and try to pull down as much as possible. But if it is not harmful, it looks kind of neat and I could just let it continue growing up the cedar.”

I e-mailed back that if the ivy were mine, I’d get rid of it and to consider that vertical ivy fruits and spreads. By the way, you only need to remove the ivy three feet above the ground and let the rest shrivel on the vine.

Dave e-mailed back after a busy weekend: “& it was a good thing I cut the ivy off the cedar tree, because it was getting embedded in the bark due to the tree’s growth and could cause future rot and damage. I did not realize how much it had wrapped around the tree until I started cutting it loose. I do recommend anyone else do the same.”

Some have asked whether ivy and herb Robert can be composted. For more information on composting weeds, I think that I’ve cajoled Kitsap Extension Agent Chris Smith into addressing the issue in a future column.

Jan Silver writes her ornamental column every other week in The Sun.

Herb Robert: Epic Cure-All or Villain of the Piece?

By John Sparks, Board Member, Trailkeepers of Oregon

Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum) is the villain of many aliases along the scorched slopes of the Columbia Gorge now exposed to a population explosion of invasive species. This small, innocuous-looking plant with pretty pink flowers is one of several Eurasian geraniums that have established themselves in our area in the last three decades.

An animal or human brushing against a mature seed capsule may cause its seeds to shoot over 15 feet, and it carpets both shady forest floors and scree slopes when there are no taller plants. The seeds are also sticky, enabling another method of distribution—attachment to a moving object such as a hiker’s sock, bird’s feather, rabbit’s fur, or car tire. This little geranium will become the first plant to establish itself after ivy has been pulled from an area. Herb Robert is now the major target of weed-pulling crews in the aftermath of the Eagle Creek Fire.

The pretty pink blossoms of herb Robert (Geranium robertianum). (Photo by John Sparks)

Despite its poor reputation in the Pacific Northwest, herb Robert has historically been valued as a “miracle” plant where it is native, although it is also connected to the practice of witchcraft. The plant is edible, and the leaves can be eaten fresh or steeped as a tea. Perhaps because of its odor, a ring of herb Robert around your garden will keep away deer and rabbits, and it has been used as an insecticide. You can rub the leaves on exposed skin to keep mosquitoes off. It is an antioxidant and it supports the immune system. It has been shown to lower blood sugar levels and has been used to treat diabetes. Traditional herbalists in Europe used it to treat ailments as varied as toothache, cancer, conjunctivitis, jaundice, nosebleed, gout, and dysentery. It was also applied to wounds and bruises. Like other geraniums, herb Robert contains geraniin, which alleviates diarrhea. Animal herbalists have employed herb Robert to treat foot-and-mouth disease in cattle.

In the modern age, one place where herb Robert flourishes is under power lines. Supposedly, it has the property to absorb radiation from the soil in a powerline corridor and break it down. In Europe, herb Robert is able to grow along railway lines and break down what nutrients it can retrieve from ground polluted by heavy metals.

And now to some of the aliases of this famous weed. One source gives about 160 common names for the plant. Here are just a handful:

Herb Robert: Said to honor Saint Robert of Molesme, an 11th-century herbalist, abbot, and founder of the Cistercian order. Another theory has it named after Robin Goodfellow, pseudonym for the mischievous fairy or forest sprite Puck. “Robert Goodfellow” was also an alias used by the legendary bandit Robin Hood. Other theories associate the plant with St. Rupert of Salzburg (8th century) or St. Robert of Turlande, an 11th-century Benedictine priest who devoted his life to serving the poor.

Red Robin: “Robin” is the diminutive of “Robert”; the stems and leaves turn red as the plant ages.

Storksbill: Under the medieval “doctrine of signatures,” parts of plants resembling parts of the body were a sign from God that the plant could be used to treat those same parts. The doctrine also applied to ‘shape’ associations. In this case, the seedpod of herb Robert looks like a stork’s bill, so the plant was used to treat bleeding after childbirth. It is also called “crane’s bill.” “Geranion,” Greek for “crane,” gave the plant its name.

Stinking Bob: The plant is variously described as smelling like diesel fuel, “burnt tires,” or just a “general chemical smell.”

Kiss-me-love-at-the garden-gate: A name given to various plants that multiply promiscuously. One thing leads to another. . . .

Jack Horner: From the popular English nursery rhyme “Little Jack Horner.” In the 18th century, the term “Jack Horner” was applied to any political opportunist.

Death-come-quickly: If the plant is picked and taken into the home, a death will soon follow. If found in the house, it is definitely a curse from the evil fairy Puck (Robin Goodfellow).

Crow’s foot: A crow’s foot was a symbol of approaching death; the plant is also sometimes called “witch’s foot.”

Bloodwort: Also under the doctrine of signatures, because the plant turns red, it was believed to have the property of regenerating blood. It was used to stop bleeding and to treat the kidneys.

Dragon’s blood: Because of its extraordinary medicinal properties, herb Robert has been associated with plants that produce what’s called “dragon’s blood,” a red resin that is used as a curative, dye, and varnish.

Dolly’s nightcap: “Dolly” was often used in southwest England to describe something small and pretty. The plant was also called “Dolly’s shoes,” “Dolly’s pinafore,” and “Dolly’s apron,” but the allusion to all these various items of clothing is unclear.

Felonwort: A “felon” is a bacterial infection in the finger, another application for this magical herb.

Fox geranium: In this case, “fox” is a corruption of “folks,” as in “fairy folk.” Calling a fairy by his or her name is considered unwise since fairies are paranoid creatures and always think you are talking ill of them. The fairy here is Puck, but we need to call him by another name, Robin Goodfellow, in order not to evoke his ire and retaliation.

John Sparks: [email protected]

Plant Database

Smith, R.W.

Geraniaceae (Geranium Family)

USDA Native Status: L48 (NI), AK (I), CAN (N), SPM (N)

Paired, pink to lavender flowers on stalks rising in axils of intricately divided leaves on hairy, reddish, branching stems.

This European introduction, naturalized in North America, is an especially attractive member of the geranium family, but the leaves have an unpleasant odor when crushed. It is variously reported to have been named for Saint Robert of Molesme, whose festival date in April occurs at about the time the flowers bloom in Europe, or for Robert Goodfellow, who is known as Robin Hood.

From the Image Gallery

Plant Characteristics

Duration: Annual
Habit: Herb
Flower:
Fruit:

Bloom Information

Bloom Color: Pink , Purple
Bloom Time: May , Jun , Jul , Aug , Sep , Oct

Distribution

USA: AK , CA , CT , IL , IN , MA , MD , ME , MI , MO , NH , NJ , NY , OH , OR , PA , RI , TN , VA , VT , WA , WI , WV
Canada: NB , NL , NS , PE
Native Distribution: Ontario east to Newfoundland, south to Virginia and Tennessee, west to Missouri, and north to Wisconsin; also from Alaska south to California.
Native Habitat: Ravines and rocky woods.

Benefit

Conspicuous Flowers: yes

National Wetland Indicator Status

Region: AGCP AK AW CB EMP GP HI MW NCNE WMVE
Status: FACU

This information is derived from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Wetland Plant List, Version 3.1 (Lichvar, R.W. 2013. The National Wetland Plant List: 2013 wetland ratings. Phytoneuron 2013-49: 1-241).Click herefor map of regions.

Additional resources

USDA: Find Geranium robertianum in USDA Plants
FNA: Find Geranium robertianum in the Flora of North America (if available)
Google: Search Google for Geranium robertianum

Metadata

Record Modified: 2018-03-08
Research By: TWC Staff

Go back

Herb-Robert Geranium robertianum

‘Herb Robert is very familiar: it lives with man, much as the Robin flips into his garden and to his back door’ – Geoffrey Grigson, ‘The Englishman’s Flora’

A pretty, pink flower commonly found in shady places.

It has five petals with rounded ends, five-lobed leaves and thin, reddish, stems. The latter are often quite hairy and produce a strong, unpleasant smell! The sepals are red.

Distribution

Common throughout the UK, apart from areas of north and north-west Scotland.

Habitat

Woods, hedgerows, shady places, scree, shingle, trails, garden weed especially by shady walls.

Best time to see

Flowers from April to September.

Did you know?

Herb Robert has a plethora of local names including Bachelor’s Buttons, Granny-thread-the-needle, Stinking Robert, Robin redbreast and Pink pinafores. Herba Sancti Ruperti was probably given to St Robert of Salzburg.

Both in England and abroad it was believed to be the plant of the house goblin, the German Knecht Ruprecht, and in England Robin Goodfellow. 16th Century mentions of this creature make him hairy, red-featured, sometimes wearing a red suit and carrying a candlestick so common qualities with the plant include colour, hairiness and candlestick beaks.

It is considered the vegetable counterpart to the Robin which can bring good luck if treated kindly or conversely terrible mishaps if killed or its nest destroyed. Associations between the bird and Herb Robert relate to colour, the beaks and the way it keeps humans company round the house.

Andrew called to tell me he had been diagnosed with advanced bowel cancer; and his doctor had told him to go away and die. He had been told about herb robert, and started taking the herb, daily. His cancer is now in remission.

… … omitted text, please see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

Recently, Mary called from North Queensland, to tell me she was enjoying a holiday on the Sunshine Coast, and a new lease of life. Her life had been marred by lung cancer, but now was free of any sign of it, which Mary believes was due, entirely, to taking herb robert daily, for 11 months, and she will continue to take it.

… … omitted text, please see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

Robyn wrote to me from interstate, saying that drinking the herb had caused bladder cancer to disappear, not even leaving a scar.

… … omitted text, please see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

Most people, who start on herb robert, immediately experience relief from pain. Some see improvement in conditions very quickly, while others may only get results after many months, of using the herb.

… … omitted text, please see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

No one can say that the herb is a cancer cure. To my knowledge, no scientific research has been done that shows it can cure any ailment. It does have special properties, like many other herbs, that can help the body to heal. Many factors can play a part in recovery from illness: including diet, exercise, natural herbal remedies, positive attitude, a loving environment, and being able to release stress. Many people have benefited by the herb, or experienced pain relief from various conditions, however this does not mean that everyone will experience full return to health.

This little plant, once called St. Robert, has been revered in herbal history for many ailments. These have included: stomach problems, as a digestive aid, a blood cleanser and body detoxifier; for diarrhea, diabetes, shingles, enteritis, skin conditions, bruises, inflammation, rheumatism and arthritis, peptic ulcers, kidney diseases and stones, hemorrhages, herpes, colds, lethargy, adrenal gland diseases, impotence, gout, liver ailments, mucus congestion, infectious sores, gastritis, hemorrhoids, painful inflammation around finger and toe nails, and eye irritations.

A friend had a growth forming over her eyes, causing blurred vision. Barb completely cleared the film, and the problem, by bathing her eyes with an infusion of the leaves. Doreen shared with me, in a letter, her experience with the herb, “I am now bugged with cataracts on both eyes. The left eye was completely blind. So I made a tea of the leaves and mixed aloe vera with this. I wash the eyes out with this mixture, twice a day. After about 3 weeks of this treatment, I am starting to gain a little sight in the left eye, and the right eye has also improved. Thank you for telling me about herb robert”.

The herb has come to the rescue, as a gargle, for many people with mouth ulcers, bleeding gums and sore throats. Rub bruised, fresh leaves over the area, or use the herb, made into a tea, as a mouth rinse and gargle. Several diabetics have found using herb robert, regularly, has helped to stabilise blood sugar levels.

Herb robert is used to help clear colitis (inflammation of the colon) which interferes with the normal, wave-like motion of peristalsis, causing cramps, constipation and mucus discharge.

Chronic fatigue is being relieved, for people who start on the herb.

… … omitted text, please see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

Rudolph Breuss, in his book, ‘Cancer and Leukaemia’, gives advice for treatment of cancer and other, seemingly incurable, diseases, saying that: besides the vegetable juice regime, and kidney tea, herb robert is essential, when dealing with all cancers, as it stimulates the kidneys to reject and eliminate poisons. He recommended that a pinch of the herb be steeped in 1 cup of boiled water for 10 minutes and drunk, cold, daily. In one chapter in the book, he wrote on infertility; he recommended, for couples who have had difficulty conceiving that both husband and wife should sip a cup of herb robert daily (made the same way as for the cancer treatment above). He knows this method is effective, from feedback he has received. In his ‘hints for farmers’ he recommends a handful of herb robert, mixed with concentrates and a little salt, fed to cows (for 3 days) that cannot come into calf.

… … omitted text, please see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

The original article I was given, stated that, for cancer treatment, the method of use was to take the leaves and stems of herb robert (either dried and powdered or finely chopped, fresh leaves) to make a heaped teaspoonful. This was mixed well with a fresh, raw egg-yolk, taken first thing in the morning, on an empty stomach. Don’t be put off by the thought of the raw egg-yolk, as believe me, it is quite palatable. The finer the herb is cut, the easier it is to swallow. Note, it only smells like foxes (to me); the flavour is not unpleasant. Approximately 20-25 large leaves and stems (10-15cm long) are required to make 1 teaspoonful of finely chopped leaves. To keep up this daily dose, quite a number of plants need to be growing and well established to have sufficient leaves for a daily supply. For people who require a consistent, ongoing, supply of leaves, I recommend that as plants flower and set seed, that these be handpicked. Seed is mature when the capsule is 2cm long, with the oval seed receptacle being plump and hard, when felt with 2 fingers. Nip off the hard capsules and leave to dry 3-4 days. Sow seeds in large pots, a shady spot in the garden, or styrofoam fruit boxes are ideal, as they can accommodate a thick planting of seeds. Cover seed with 5mm of fine soil. Water regularly, so the soil does not dry out. Germination can take from 2-6 weeks, depending on temperature and climatic conditions. For people using the herb daily with raw egg-yolk, it is advisable to get 6-10 styrofoam boxes of plants established, and also to maintain an ongoing regime of regular seed planting. It is the consistent, daily, use of the herb that is important to improved health. For any other therapeutic use, or people wishing to use it as a preventative and strengthen their immune system, the leaves and stems (fresh or dried) can be used as a tea, sweetened with honey, if desired. Some people blend the leaves together with fruit juice, or add to vegetables and fruits when juicing.

Let me share how I use the herb. Each morning, before breakfast, I visit my garden to collect 4-5 leaves and stems of herb robert. Then I pick 5-6 gotu kola leaves, several nasturtium leaves and flowers, a small handful of sheep sorrel and whatever else I feel like adding, which could be a comfrey leaf, watercress, yarrow and lemon balm (if I am planning to have avocado on toast). In the kitchen, the herbs get cut rather coarsely with a knife and heaped over toast, muesli, or whatever I have for breakfast.

Herb Robert box

Herb robert has always been esteemed for its homeostatic action, the ability to help maintain an environment of physiological, organic stability, even when the body’s natural function or condition has been disrupted.

I believe this herb can be a valuable addition for every person’s daily well being. Use it as part of cancer treatment or cancer prevention. Today, I checked with the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the Cancer Mortality figures. The latest figures available are for the year 2000, which showed 35,628 deaths, in a population of less than 20 million; (note these figures give us no idea how many thousands of people are also diagnosed with cancer, each year). With this alarmingly high, incidence of cancer in Australia, let’s all do what we can do, at a personal level, to change these statistics. Share information of the benefits of herb robert with family and friends. If we can use the healing properties of Herb Robert, and also increase the concentration of oxygen circulating in our bodies, our immune system will be strengthened, so that we can resist disease and lay the foundation for high-level wellness.

It is believed that the herb was probably named after the 11th Century French saint Robert, Abbot of Molerne, whose medical skills were legendary. Let’s use this herb for our health and healing. Herb Robert could be called a true saint, for the way it has helped and blessed so many people.

Description 3

Herb-Robert is a ubiquitous sprawling plant well-known for its strong disagreeable mousy smell and its cheerful bright pink flowers (4).This odour is referred to by the local names stinking Robert and stinky Bob (4). In folklore it is the plant belonging to the mischievous house goblin Robin Goodfellow (the name Robin is a diminutive of Robert) (5). This leafy plant is generally hairy, with bright green finely divided leaves and reddish-tinged stems (2). It has many varied local names including bloodwort, which reflects the use of the plant in folk medicine to staunch blood flow (5). Although the petals are usually bright pink, white forms arise in some areas (2).

Distribution 4

Distribution: N. America, Canary Islands, C. & S. Europe, Turkey, Iran, Caucasus, Siberia, C. Asia and W. Himalayas.

Habitat 5

This plant is able to tolerate shade, and often occurs close to human habitation (5) (3). Typical habitats favoured by this species include woodlands, hedgerows, coastal shingle and shaded banks. It also thrives in artificial sites that are subject to disturbance (3).

Edible 6

The leaves of this plant can be eaten raw or brewed as a tea Same with the flowers and the stems but these two parts of the plant can be stored for future use by drying them. Rubbing of the fresh leaves on the skin can help to also chase away mosquitoes.

Sources and Credits

More Info

  • iNat taxon page
  • African Plants – a photo guide
  • Atlas of Living Australia
  • Biodiversity Heritage Library
  • Calflora
  • CalPhotos
  • eFloras.org
  • Flora Digital de Portugal
  • GBIF
  • Go Botany
  • Google Scholar
  • IPNI + POWO
  • Jepson eFlora
  • Maryland Biodiversity Project
  • NatureServe Explorer
  • New Zealand Plant Conservation Network
  • SEINet Symbiota portals
  • The Plant List
  • Tree of Life
  • Tropicos
  • USDA PLANTS database
  • VASCAN by Canadensys

Herb Robert, oxygenator extraordinaire overview


“Recently, a lass rang from Brisbane. She had lumps in her breast. Someone had shared with her about herb robert and she had been taking the herb, for about 8 weeks. She said, “I don’t know if it is coincidence, but the lumps are going’. Perhaps, it is a coincidence; perhaps, it is a miracle. Perhaps, her body is healing with the help of the herb.”
“Over 10 years ago, I held a herb course for people at Kingaroy. Some time later, a lady who attended the course, rang me to say that her vet had given the verdict: that their aged dog with cancer should be put down. She asked me if it would be worth trying herb robert. I suggested chopping up half a dozen leaves, very finely, and mixing this with the dog’s food daily. The dog made a full recovery. She told the vet what she had done. Sometime later, she rang me: to say her vet had rung her, asking what herb she used for her dog, as he had another aged dog with cancer.”
“Six weeks ago, Donna rang for some herb robert, as her dog had a cancerous growth and the vet had only given the dog four weeks to live. She started the dog on the herb, This Week, she rang to say that the lump had diminished in size considerably, and that she needed more of the plant.”
“Val called, to see what could help her dog that had severe abscesses. She started her pet on herb robert, (dried leaves I posted to her, blended to a powder); a teaspoon of the herb was mixed with a little water and added to the food each day. She rang back, soon after, to say that the herb robert quickly got rid of the abscesses.”
“Recently, Mary called from North Queensland, to tell me she was enjoying a holiday on the Sunshine Coast, and a new lease of life. Her life had been marred by lung cancer, but now was free of any sign of it, which Mary believes was due, entirely, to taking herb robert daily, for eleven months, and she will continue to take it.”
“Audrey wrote, from Sydney, to share that her brother has eliminated a skin cancer on his leg, with herb robert, which he was due to have cut out. Our doctor was very surprised at ‘the results, and mentioned it to a doctor colleague of hers, who is beginning to get interested in alternative methods.”
“Some years ago, the local’ Cansurvive’ group asked me to speak, at their monthly meeting. Martina had numerous skin cancers. She started eating 5 leaves a day and all her skin cancer disappeared. She told a friend, who also had skin cancer. Her friend did the same, eating 5 leaves a day and, after 6 weeks, had no sign of any cancer.”

“Robyn wrote to me from interstate, saying that drinking the herb had caused bladder cancer to disappear, not even leaving a scar.”
“Recently, Janet excitedly rang to say that, after using herb robert for 3 weeks her tumour count went down from 29 to 10. Janet now shares herb robert with many people; just simply passing on information that has helped her. She told me how she’d had car trouble, having to stop at a service station, and that she started sharing with the assistant. He knew someone with cancer, so he said he would pass the information on. Janet felt that her car problems were part of a divine plan that took her to the service station, as someone needed to know about the herb. This is what we could call our ‘Australian caring spirit’ and sharing the best of herb folklore.”
“Most people, who start on herb robert, immediately experience relief from pain. Some see improvement in conditions very quickly, while others may only get results after many months, of using the herb.”
“Clarissa wrote from interstate to say, ‘After 2 weeks on the herb, lumps in the breast cannot, now, be detected with ultra sound, so it is within my interest to keep on with the herb”.”
“A friend had a growth forming over her eyes, causing blurred vision. Barb completely cleared the film, and the problem, by bathing her eyes with an infusion of the leaves.”


Regarded as a “noxious weed” by officialdom

“Doreen shared with me, in a letter, her experience with the herb” “I am now bugged with cataracts on both eyes. The left eye was completely blind. So I made a tea of the leaves and mixed aloe vera with this. I wash the eyes out with this mixture, twice a day. After about 3 weeks of this treatment, I am starting to gain a little sight in the left eye, and the right eye has also improved. Thank you for telling me about herb robert.”
“Recently, Robert shared his experience of herb robert with me. For ten years he had been unable to work due to sickness, and had been to many doctors and natural therapists. In 1999, he was diagnosed with chronic fatigue. He started taking 4-5 leaves a day and, within a couple of days, his problem of cold feet, which was due to poor circulation, was eliminated. Within a short period of time, he was walking and jogging up to 6 km a day, and life was worth living again. At present he is working 80 hours a week but he must keep up taking the herb daily, to be free of chronic fatigue. He has shared his experiences, with friends who also suffered with chronic fatigue. One friend had suffered for 24 years, and now, also, has received relief by the daily ritual of eating several leaves.”


Herb Robert cascading over rocks

Australian Law is such that no one can legally say that the herb is a cancer cure. No scientific research has been done that shows it can cure any ailment. It does have special properties, like many other herbs, that can help the body to heal. Many people have benefited by the herb, or experienced pain relief from various conditions, however this does not mean that everyone will experience full return to health.
This little plant, once called St. Robert, has been revered in herbal history for many ailments. These have included: stomach problems, as a digestive aid, a blood cleanser and body detoxifier. for diarrhea, diabetes, shingles, enteritis, skin conditions, bruises, inflammation, rheumatism and arthritis, peptic ulcers, kidney diseases and stones, hemorrhages, herpes, colds, lethargy, adrenal gland diseases, impotency, gout, liver ailments, mucus congestion, infectious sores, gastritis, hemorrhoids painful inflammation around finger and toe nails, and eye irritations.
The herb has come to the rescue. as a gargle, for many people with mouth ulcers, bleeding gums and sore throats, Rub bruised, fresh leaves over the area, or use the herb, made into a tea, as a mouth rinse and gargle. Several diabetics have found using herb robert, regularly, has helped to stabilise blood sugar levels.
Herb robert is used to help clear colitis (inflammation of the colon) which interferes with the normal, wave-like motion of peristalsis, causing cramps, constipation and mucus discharge.
Chronic fatigue is being relieved, for people who start on the herb.
It was valued highly as a wound herb, no doubt due to its astringent properties, and it was also thought to be a herb capable of mending fractures. In Europe, it is seen growing wild, and has been a traditional herb for cancer as it was believed to be “a dose of natural radiation”.
Rudolph Breuss, in his book, “Cancer and Leukaemia”, gives advice for treatment of cancer and other, seemingly incurable, diseases, saying that: besides the vegetable juice regime, and kidney tea, herb robert is essential, when dealing with all cancers, as it stimulates the kidneys to reject and eliminate poisons. He recommended that a pinch of the herb be steeped in 1 cup of boiled water for 10 minutes and drunk, cold, daily. In one chapter in the book, he wrote on infertility recommending for couples who have had difficulty conceiving that both husband and wife should sip a cup of herb robert daily (made the same way as for the cancer treatment above). He knows this method is effective, from feedback he has received. In his “hints for farmers” he recommends a handful of herb robert, mixed with concentrates and a little salt, fed to cows (for 3 days) that cannot come into calf.
The astringent action, of leaves and stems of the plant, has been valued from mediaeval times, for healing wounds and to stop bleeding: which gave it the common name, ‘bloodwort’. For external use, the juice from crushed leaves is rubbed on sunspots, rashes and sores; or leaves made as an infusion are used as a wash or a poultice. A hot poultice made of steeped leaves is said to be soothing to bladder pains, neuralgia, bruises, fistulas and persistent skin problems.
Another application of the herb has been as a foot infusion, said to help remove toxins, heavy metals and radiation from the body. This is highly recommended for people who have been subject to many x-rays, or people continually working in the fields of computers, mobile phones, and other electronics, giving off ELF and VLF radiation, infrared and microwave irradiation, and x-rays.
To make a Foot Infusion: take a handful of chopped herb, place into a bowl (large enough to rest both feet in) pour 4-5 cups of boiling water over it and stir, vigorously. Then add cold water, to adjust to heat bearable to place feet in. Sit in a comfy chair with your feet in the bowl for 15 minutes, relax and read your favourite herb book. This is also excellent therapy for tired or aching feet.
The original article I was given, stated that, for cancer treatment, the method of use was to take the leaves and stems of herb robert (either dried and powdered or finely chopped, fresh leaves) to make a heaped teaspoonful. This was mixed well with a fresh, raw egg-yolk, taken first thing in the morning, on an empty stomach. Don’t be put off by the thought of the raw egg-yolk, as believe me, it is quite palatable. The finer the herb is cut the easier it is to swallow. Note, it only smells like foxes (to me); the flavour is not unpleasant.


Herb Robert flowers and seedpods

Approximately 20-25 large leaves and stems (10-1 5cm long) are required to make 1 teaspoonful of finely Chopped leaves. To keep up this daily dose, quite a number of plants need to be growing and well established to have sufficient leaves for a daily supply. For people who require a consistent, ongoing, supply of leaves, I recommend that as plants flower and set seed, that these be handpicked. Seed is mature when the capsule is 2cm long, with the oval seed receptacle being plump and hard, when felt with 2 fingers. Nip off the hard capsules and leave to dry 3-4 days. grow seeds. in large pots, a shady spot in the garden or styrofoam fruit boxes are ideal, as they can accommodate a thick planting of seeds. Cover seed with 5mm of fine soil. Water regularly, so the soil does not dry out. Germination can take from 2-6 weeks, depending on temperature and climatic conditions. For people using the herb daily with raw egg-yolk, it is advisable to get 6-10 styrofoarn boxes of plants established, and also to maintain an ongoing regime of regular seed planting. It is the consistent, daily, use of the herb that is important to improved health.
For any other therapeutic use, or people wishing to use it as a preventative and strengthen their immune system, the leaves and stems (fresh or dried) can be used as a tea, sweetened with honey, if desired. Some people blend the leaves together with fruit juice, or add to vegetables and fruits when juicing.
Herb robert has always been esteemed for its homeostatic action, the ability to help maintain an environment of physiological, organic stability, even when the body’s natural function or condition has been disrupted.
This herb is undisputably a valuable addition for every person’s daily well being. Use it as part of cancer treatment or cancer prevention.
It is believed that the herb was probably named after the 11 th Century French saint Robert, Abbot of Molerne, whose medical skills were legendary. Herb Robert could also be called a true saint for the way it has helped and blessed so many people.

Herb Robert

Common names

  • Bloodwort
  • Fox Geranium
  • Herb Robert
  • Red Robin

Herb Robert is an annually growing herb that grows up to a maximum height of 24 inches and has a flushed divided stem that is clammy as well as covered with hair. The leaves of herb Robert are split palmately having pale green leaflets that have a purplish tinge at the edges. The herb blooms between May and October and each flower has five pink-hued petals as well as five purple sepals. The seeds of herb Robert are thrown out by the sudden bursting of the pods whose shape has resemblance to cranes’ bill. When you are dealing with herb Robert, it exudes a potently unpleasant smell.

The assortment of names that herb Robert is known by offers a clear picture of this herb. Herb Robert belongs to the plant family geranium and its name has been derived from the Greek term ‘geranos’ denoting ‘crane’, since the seedpods of the plant have a resemblance to cranes’ bill. However, the common name of the herb has been derived from the Medieval Latin herba Roberti, however, it is still a mystery as to which Robertus is precisely responsible for the plant’s name. Among the leading names which might have been behind the common name of herb Robert is a French monk St. Robert of Molesme (died in 1110); St. Rupert of Salzburg (died c. 718) or Duke of Normandy Robert (died in 1134).

It is known that St. Rupert was invoked for long in instances of erysipelas, a throbbing skin ailment, and a number of people assert that it was St. Rupert who was the first to find the efficacy of the herb in stopping hemorrhages and, hence, the herb is alternatively known by the name ‘bloodwort’. Owing to the reputation of herb Robert as an effective remedy for felons, a condition wherein the patient has inflammations in the region of the fingernails and toenails, this herb was also referred to as felonwort. In addition, herb Robert is also known as red robin and fox geranium and this is perhaps owing to the reddish flowers borne by the plant.

The primary efficacy of herb Robert is in the form of an astringent that is applied topically to skin bruises and exasperations. Since the medieval period, people made a compress using the entire plant to treat wounds as well as facilitate in stopping hemorrhages. Despite its extensive use in some regions of the world earlier, currently the popularity of the herb has waned.

Parts used

Aerial parts, root.

Uses

While herb Robert was quite popular in folklore medicine, especially in Europe, currently this herb is seldom used in European herbal medicine. It is only sometimes that herb Robert is used in a similar manner as the American cranesbill (botanical name, Geranium maculatum), in the form of an astringent as well as to heal wounds. There is a need for further examination to study the usefulness of the herb to cure different medical conditions. One authority asserts that herb Robert is also effectual in treating stomach ulcers and uterus inflammation. It is also claimed that herb Robert possesses the potential to develop as an effective remedy for cancer.

An entire skin care aisle – in one container.

In earlier times, people used herb Robert to cure toothache as well as nosebleeds. When the fresh leaves of this herb are crushed they exude a disagreeable smell akin to that of burning tires. The fresh leaves of herb Robert are rubbed on the body and are believed to repel insects.

It may be noted that herb Robert is a valuable natural resource of germanium, a vital element for the body, since it has the aptitude to supply oxygen to the cells. When there is additional supply of oxygen to the cells, it denotes that the body possesses the prospect to combat maladies by its own powers and, therefore, the healing process is faster. On the other hand, the harmful free radicals may result in the absence of free oxygen supply to the cells, which, in turn, create a toxic state in the region of the cells. Such a condition denotes that the cells are not able to receive the necessary supply of oxygen or nourishments for regeneration. In such a case, the area becomes anaerobic (absence of free oxygen) and these result in the beginning of diseases, pain, errant cells and even cancer.

Seaweed facial mask slows down the skin aging process and defends the skin from harsh environments.

The leaves of herb Robert are known to possess anti-rheumatic, mildly diuretic, astringent and vulnerary (any substance or medicine that promotes healing of wounds) attributes. Contemporary researches have shown that the leaves of this herb also have the aptitude to lower the blood sugar levels and, hence, it may be helpful in treating diabetes. An infusion prepared with the herb Robert leaves is employed to treat bleeding, infections of the kidney, stomach disorders, jaundice and other health conditions. In addition, the preparations of the herb’s leaves are also used topically in the form of a wash or poultice that is applied to distended and throbbing breasts, bruises, rheumatic pains, bleeding and other such medical conditions. Instead of using just the leaves of herb Robert, it is ideal to use the entire plants, counting the roots. Plants of this species may be harvested during any time between the later parts of spring to early autumn. Herb Robert plant is generally used fresh. In addition to herbal formulations, herb Robert is also used to prepare a homeopathic medication.

Using this rich in seaweeds cream will help you to improve your skin-tone and reduce the appearance of sun and age spots.

Habitat and cultivation

Herb Robert is indigenous to Asia and Europe and, over the years, the plant has been naturalized in North America. This herb is harvested during summer and it forms an outstanding advantage in any garden. In effect, herb Robert is an ally of the plant kingdom – the common escort plant. Anywhere herb Robert grows, the plants growing in the vicinity are remarkably more healthy and more robust/ energetic.

Herb Robert is commonly propagated by its seeds. Plants of this species flourish well in the shade and moist places. The plant not only grows robustly, but also blooms in abundance and readily self seeds. Provided the leaves are collected on a regular basis, the plant produces an abundance of leaves. However, it is important to nourish as well as water the plants continuously.

It may be noted that pests and insects never create any trouble for herb Robert. The unpleasant smell of the leaves of the plant works as an insect repellent and may also be employed in animals’ bedding. This is one reason why people in earlier times used this herb to keep insects and pests away.

Herb Robert has a preference for light or sandy, loam or medium and clay or heavy soils and needs a soil that has a proper drainage. In addition, plants of this species can thrive in all types of soil, including neutral, acidic and alkaline or basic. Herb Robert grows excellently on the periphery of forest lands. As mentioned earlier, the whole plant exudes a horrible smell when handled. Plants belonging to this genus are seldom bothered by rabbits or deer.

Constituents

Herb Robert contains a bitter principle (geraniin), tannins, citric acid, and traces of volatile oils.

Usual dosage

The ideal dosage of herb Robert infusion prepared with the dried herb is two teaspoons, while it is one teaspoon when the infusion is prepared with the plant’s dry root. It may be noted that herb Robert is also employed to prepare homeopathic medications, typically at a potency of D1. In addition to tinctures and infusions, the extracts of herb Robert as well as American cranesbill also form an active ingredient in tablets.

Side effects and cautions

Herb Robert is normally considered to be safe for use.

Rejuvenate your look and reduce the signs of aging with this seaweed anti-aging face mask.

Stop losing your hair with this outstanding, 100% natural formula.
FOR MEN AND WOMEN.

All the strength of pharmaceutical fungicides – but without the harsh chemicals.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *