Ways to Transplant Pachysandra

Many people are afraid to transplant plants such as Pachysandra. They fear they will damage or even kill them. Pachysandra plants are very hearty and strong. There are some ways that they can be transplanted without permanently harming them. These plants can be transplanted any time during the year, as long as the ground is not frozen. Springtime is more beneficial because it allows for the root system to grow and get established into the soil.

Digging up entire plants is one way of moving Pachysandra to another location in the yard. However, if it has been at the same location for a long time, their roots might run rather deep. They run horizontally through the soil. Sometimes, digging around the edge of the ground cover with a shovel will allow a person to roll the Pachysandra up as though it was a piece of carpet. If this is done, keep the roots out of sunlight and moist until it is transplanted. Transplant it as soon as possible. The longer the roots are out of the dirt, the easier the roots can become dried out and possibly harm the plants. Transplant the carpet the way a single Pachysandra plant is planted, allowing enough loose dirt, water and space for it to get acclimated and established.
There are more simple ways to transplant Pachysandra. Pachysandra roots spread through terminals that are in their root system. Their stems of the root are thick and run in a horizontal direction under the ground. They are called rhizomes and they have little nodes on them. More roots and shoots develop from these little nodes and grow. Separate the rhizomes with your fingers. Then cut them away from the plant, transplant them in the desired location 6 to 12 inches apart. Cover the entire stem of the root with dirt, just as you would transplant the entire root of a Pachysandra plant. The roots are totally buried in the soil.
Another way to transplant, and the most simplest, is to just cut off a stem of the Pachysandra plant (not the stem in the root system) and place it directly into the soil in the yard or in a pot. Keep the soil moist and well drained. After a week or so, the stem should start to grow roots.
If you are interested in gardening and would like to use Pachysandra plants, don’t go to any of the big name stores because they tend to rip you off. Instead, buy your plants at JW-Pachysandra. You can’t beat the low price and high-quality combination that JW-Pachysandra provides and our plants are environmentally safe.
We have over 40 years of experience in growing and selling quality Pachysandra plants to customers all over the U.S.
We sell Pachysandra in five different varieties and offer FREE shipping nationwide for orders over $100. All plants will be priced at $0.60 a piece except for Common Pachysandra that will be priced at $0.50 a piece.
Call us today at 845-223-3801.

 Is Pachysandra too Invasive for Garden Use?

Pachysandra is a plant that’s known for being able to grow in the shade. It’s also evergreen, so it looks good all year. Unfortunately, it’s also known for being very invasive. In some states, it is even on the invasive species list and subject to restrictions.

The question of whether pachysandra is too invasive for garden use has an answer that depends on the conditions. When kept properly contained and well-trimmed, it can be controlled well enough to be planted in gardens. It becomes invasive when the gardener allows it to grow rampantly. Once it gets out of control, it is almost impossible to contain.

Pachysandra is evergreen and spreads by sending out runners from its roots. That can be good or awful depending on whether it is wanted. In gardens where nothing else will grow, it’s great. The trick is to keep it under a tight rein. Deep, impermeable edging should be used so it can’t send roots out of its assigned area. This edging should be well maintained at all times to prevent the pachysandra from becoming invasive.
The top growth of pachysandra also needs to be carefully controlled. If it is ignored, it will climb over nearby plants and can kill them. Therefore, it needs to be trimmed regularly to keep its size in check. The speed at which it can grow out of control helps give it its reputation as an invasive plant.

These characteristics make the successful cultivation of pachysandra highly dependent on the habits of the gardener who grows it. Gardeners who enjoy being outside and working in their gardens every day or two can have great success with this plant. They’ll love doting on it and pruning it into a beautiful carpet that stays in the garden.

Do you want additional information on how to use Pachysandra for your garden? Then contact JW-Pachysandra! We can help you with all your Pachysandra needs!

If you are interested in gardening and would like to use Pachysandra plants, don’t go to any of the big name stores because they tend to rip you off. Instead, buy your plants at JW-Pachysandra – you can’t beat the low price and high-quality combination that JW-Pachysandra provides and our plants are environmentally safe..

We have over 40 years of experience in growing and selling quality Pachysandra plants to customers all over the U.S. We sell Pachysandra in five different varieties and offer FREE shipping nationwide.

Call us today at 845-223-3801.

Problem Plant: Japanese Pachysandra

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Propagating Pachysandra – Knowledgebase Question

Japanese Spurge (Pachysandra terminalis)
Posted by plantrob
Pachysandra is usually propagated by cuttings taken in late spring when the new growth has hardened off a bit and the leaves are mature; the cuttings are put into in a light soil mix and should be well rooted in about 2 months.
Depending on how much of an area you have to fill and how much pachysandra you have to spare, you might try taking some large divisions or clumps in early spring. Water the plants well the day before. Dig out a largish shovel full by carefully digging straight around the edges and going down well below the root zone– a sharp flat spade works well for this. Replant the “sods” at the same depth they grew originally. Be sure to have a well prepared planting bed supplied with plenty of organic matter to move them into for best success; water them in well and be sure they receive adequate moisture for the full growing season next year. Fill in the spots you dug from with good organic matter to help the remaining plants fill in quickly.
Good luck with your project!

Transplanting Pachysandra: 6 Tips

Pachysandra is a hardy ground cover plant that can be transplanted at virtually any time of the year. The best time is spring time to give the plant the longest time to get established.

Dividing Rhizomes

Pachysandra Terminalis spreads by rhizomes, which are thick horizontal stems under the ground. The rhizomes have nodes from which roots and shoots grow. Simply check the rhizomes for nodes with roots and divide them at that point. Plant the divided rhizomes up to a foot apart and water them daily.

Working with Cuttings

Cuttings from the stems or leaves of this evergreen plant will root rapidly either in pots or by being placed straight into the soil.

Use a Rooting Mix

Although a ready rooter, planting pachysandra with a rooting mix will ensure good root growth–especially if you are transplanting late in the year.

Adding Mulch

Whenever you transplant pachysandra you should add a little light mulch around the plants to prevent the soil from drying out.

Place in Awkward Areas

Transplant pachysandra to those parts of the garden where other plants fail. Acid soil, steep slopes and even shaded areas can be populated and turned green.

Pachysandra is tough as well as attractive. It can be invasive so be careful about planting it near areas where you don’t want it to spread.

Growing Pachysandra Plants – How To Plant Pachysandra Ground Cover

Pachysandra is a favorite ground cover plant in hard-to-plant areas such as under trees, or in shady areas with poor or acidic soil. Unlike other plants, pachysandra ground cover does not mind competing for its nutrients, and growing pachysandra plants is easy if you have an abundance of shade in your landscape. Learn more about how to plant pachysandra and its care so you can enjoy the small white, fragrant flowers (which appear in the spring) of this low maintenance plant.

How to Plant Pachysandra

There are several varieties of pachysandra available to choose from. The recommended pachysandra growing zone for U.S. Department of Agriculture is 4 through 7.

Pachysandra is easily transplanted from garden flats or divisions in the spring. Space the plants 6 to 12 inches apart to accommodate their spread.

Pachysandra prefers soil that is moist and amended with rich organic matter. Make sure the planting area is clear from debris before planting and that the soil is loose. Holes for new plants should be 4 inches deep and 6 inches wide.

Pachysandra ground cover has evergreen leaves that will burn in the sun. It is always best to plant on an overcast day and in shady locations. Water new plants thoroughly and provide 2 inches of mulch to help with water retention.

Pachysandra Plant Care

Pachysandra requires only minimal care to look its best. New plants can be pinched back for several years to encourage bushiness.

Keep areas of pachysandra free from weeds and monitor young plants during dry weather.

Once plants are established, they can handle some period of drought; however, young plants require adequate moisture in order to become established.

Now that you know a little more about pachysandra plant care, you can enjoy this low-growing beauty in the shady spots of your landscape.

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