How to grow your own Marigold

1. Seeds & Soil Preparation

A. SOIL PREPARATION Empty the soil bag to the very environmentally friendly coconut pot. Don’t forget to leave about a quarter of an inch or so of empty space in between the surface of the soil and rim of the pot to ensure proper growth. Press the mixture slightly to eliminate stubborn air pockets. Dampen the mixture thoroughly with water so it’s ready to provide the right environment for seeds to germinate.

B. SOW. Drop at least 2-3 seeds into the pot making sure they have ample space in between. Cover them lightly with some soil at least 1-2mm deep. Water the pot very lightly to ensure good seed–to-mix contact.

C. SEAL & NURTURE. Leaving the pot completely open will allow too much heat as well as allowing moisture to escape, this may cause fewer germination or no germination at all. To prevent this, look for a clear plastic kitchen wrap or bag and spray it with some water. Be sure that the moist side of the plastic will sit above the soil. Go ahead and secure the plastic (moist side inside) with a rubber band or thread, acting as the pot’s lid. This will help it to retain the moisture that the seeds need to germinate properly. Twice daily, remove the wrap and sprinkle the pot with some water especially when it’s hot.

2. Germination & Vegetation

A. TIME TO UNVEIL THEM. Remove the plastic wrap when the sprouts start to emerge (around 5-8 days after step 1). When you see the first green tendrils (tiny stems) push up through the soil, you can then remove the wrap. Germination is over, now the second stage starts. It’s called vegetative stage. In this stage leaves will form and it will gradually grow. You need to keep the soil moist to aid the growing plant. You may water it very lightly at least two times daily preferably in the morning and late afternoon to maintain its moisture.

B. THINNING. Thin seedlings after they get their second sets of leaves. Pull out the weakest seedlings (Note: perform thinning after the emergence of the true leaves- 4th leaf), for the strongest, healthiest plants you’ll want just one seedling per pot. Discard plucked out seedlings or you can try to transplant them into different pots, but you risk damaging the roots of the plant, which can adversely affect its rate of survival.

3. Hydration, Sun Exposure & Fertilization

A. HYDRATION & SUN EXPOSURE. Because the potting mix in a pot dries quickly; you will need to water oh so frequently. Keep the soil damp but not soaked. When the plants have begun to sprout, they will need to be watered regularly but the soil should be allowed to dry out between watering. Do not water your Marigolds from overhead. Water at the base of the plant.

Marigolds grown in cool, damp conditions are likely to develop problems with mold, mildew and fungus. These problems can be avoided BY KEEPING YOUR MARIGOLDS IN FULL SUN.

B. FERTILIZATION. That frequent watering tends to wash out nutrients from the pot’s soil, as well as some of it was already acquired by the plant so you will need to replenish it with fertilizer. Start to fertilize 14-21 days after emergence of sprout and every 15 days. Sprinkle at least 5-10 pcs of DURABLOOM Pellets to the soil for its nutrients requirements. You can crush the pellet and sprinkle indirectly around the marigold for faster absorption. (Note: not a single bit of nutrient will ever reach the plant system if not carried out by water) it is a must that you water the pot after fertilizer application or apply it before you do your watering. You can also enhance the marigold development by giving it direct nutrients, dilute ½ teaspoon of DURABLOOM Foliar in 2 Litres of water and spray it to the leaves of the plant. This will boost root development and ensure that the plant will utilize all nutrients available in the potting media. You can do this once a week.

4. Protection & Harvesting

A. DEADHEADING AND PEST MANAGEMENT. “Deadheading” is a cultivating process in which you snip off dead blossoms from flowering plants. While not strictly necessary, deadheading your marigolds will help prompt the plant to produce new flowers.

Gardeners have long known that marigolds make important companion plants all over the garden. Not only does the scent of the marigold repel animals and insects, but the underground workings of the marigold will repel nematodes worms and other pests.

B. SEEDS HARVESTING. To harvest your marigold seeds, leave the flowers on their stems to dry. Wait for the flowers to wilt and die and after about a week the petals and shell will turn dry and brittle, and the flower will take on a brownish color. When this happens simply grasp the dried up flower and pull it out of the pod. The seeds will come through the opening in a tight cluster attached to the withered flower. Clasp that cluster of seeds and pull it from the dried flower to separate them. Let the seeds dry for a few days on an open plate, or newspaper before storing them.

How to Plant and Care For Marigolds in Your Home or Garden

Why gardeners grow marigolds

Bright, bold, bountiful blooms give marigolds their celebrity status. As annuals, marigolds bloom in summer months and into autumn, typically until the first frost of the year. There are six key characteristics that prove these golden beauties deserve a place in your gardens:

  1. Beauty—Marigolds will add an excellent aesthetic to your home or garden. Even after first frost—when many marigolds perish—dried marigolds make robust and vivid additions to dried floral arrangements.
  2. Low maintenance—These flowers are very easy to grow from seeds or seedlings. Marigold care is also very simple—some can survive even if neglected.
  3. Mosquito repellent—A distinctive bitter and pungent scent is produced by marigolds. This odor stems from plant-based chemicals including pyrethrum, an active ingredient in many commercial insect repellents. A study published in the Iranian Journal of Arthropod-Borne Diseases found that essential oil from a species of marigold works as well as DEET to repel mosquitoes for up to two hours.
  4. Companion plants—Marigolds support the health of most garden plants and repel pests including beetles, roundworms, and deer—all of which can wreak havoc on your carefully tended garden. This means that marigolds are excellent companion plants for your garden.
  5. Honeybee support—Because marigolds naturally repel some insects, gardens with marigolds may not require insecticide. As a result, honeybees that visit the garden are not exposed to harmful pesticides. And a healthy honeybee population is critical to biodiversity and agricultural production.
  6. Edible—Marigold flowers add a spicy tang as well as color in salads or other dishes. To be eaten, flowers must be grown without using pesticides and should be sampled to test for allergic reactions before being included in the meal.

When to plant marigolds

Marigolds are native to the western hemisphere and grow in the wild between the southwestern United States through Central and South America. Most marigolds thrive in warm, dry conditions, but marigolds can be grown successfully anywhere outdoors as long as the temperature remains above 40°F.

Most garden marigolds are annuals. And even though they are hardy, marigolds are not frost tolerant. They should not be sown or planted outdoors until all chance of frost has passed. If you live in a region with a late last frost date, you can begin nurturing marigold seeds indoors six to eight weeks before the last frost. Seedlings will be ready to plant once the soil is warm—above 40°F.

How to Grow Your Own Marigold

A. DEADHEADING AND PEST MANAGEMENT. “Deadheading” is a cultivating process in which you snip off dead blossoms from flowering plants. While not strictly necessary, deadheading your marigolds will help prompt the plant to produce new flowers.

Gardeners have long known that marigolds make important companion plants all over the garden. Not only does the scent of the marigold repel animals and insects, but the underground workings of the marigold will repel nematodes worms and other pests.

B. SEEDS HARVESTING. To harvest your marigold seeds, leave the flowers on their stems to dry. Wait for the flowers to wilt and die and after about a week the petals and shell will turn dry and brittle, and the flower will take on a brownish color. When this happens simply grasp the dried up flower and pull it out of the pod. The seeds will come through the opening in a tight cluster attached to the withered flower. Clasp that cluster of seeds and pull it from the dried flower to separate them. Let the seeds dry for a few days on an open plate, or newspaper before storing them.

Popular with gardeners coast to coast! Marigolds (Tagetes erecta) are one of the easiest — and most beautiful — annuals to grow. Compact flowers, ranging in color from pale yellow to deep orange and rust, make a spectacular addition to pots, baskets and borders or simply scattered throughout the garden. This quick germinator has a distinct spicy aroma and adds a splash of color all summer long. Looks great in dried floral arrangements too!

Marigolds are not fussy and tolerate a wide range of soil and climate conditions, but most of all, they love heat. There are many varieties available of this cheerful garden favorite, from miniature to giant. Try growing marigolds in and around vegetable plants to repel insect pests. Hardy annual, 10-18 inches tall.

Fun Fact: In Macer’s Herbal, a 10th century manuscript on the healing properties of plants, marigolds were said to draw evil humours out of the head and strengthen the eyesight.

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One of the simplest – and most beautiful – annuals to grow in the garden.

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Heirloom marigolds are one of the simplest – and most beautiful – annuals to grow. Planting instructions are included with each seed packet and shipping is FREE!​

Quick Guide: Planting, Growing & Caring for Marigolds

  1. Bright yellow is the most common color, but some varieties are pale yellow to deep orange
  2. Start seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost or plant seedlings outdoors after last frost
  3. Choose a site with full sun and soil amended with compost
  4. Water regularly; protect from frost
  5. An annual that blooms all season long

Sunlight: Full sun
Maturity: 50-80 days from seed to flower
Height: 6 to 18 inches
Spacing: 8 to 18 inches apart in all directions

Site Preparation

Marigolds are not fussy and will tolerate most conditions. However, with rich, well-drained soil and plenty of sunshine, these plants will thrive. Generous amounts of organic compost or well-aged manure mixed into the garden prior to planting will greatly improve the health of flowers (see Springtime Garden Soil Preparation). Keep the soil moist, but not wet.

How to Plant

Sow marigold seed directly in the ground and cover with a thin layer of soil (about 1/8 inch deep). Water thoroughly. Thin to 8-18 inches apart after seedlings have sprouted. Marigolds can also be started early indoors under grow lights for transplanting outdoors about six to eight weeks before the last frost date. Read our article Starting Annual Flowers Indoors to learn more.

Once established and healthy, marigolds will continue growing easily, even if left unattended. Water to keep the soil moist.

Provide nutrients monthly with a bud and bloom booster once plants have started flowering. Pinch off the spent blossoms to extend the flowering season. Mulch to prevent weeds, conserve moisture and improve aesthetics. Marigolds will not survive a hard frost or freeze.

Insect & Disease Problems

Marigolds have few problems with insect pests. In fact, the flowers can be planted around cabbage and broccoli plants to help deter and repel cabbage moths. Read our Companion Planting Guide to learn how some plants perform better when grown together.

Keep an eye out for slugs, which can decimate the plants overnight. Monitor closely and treat with Sluggo® Bait or diatomaceous earth if damage is found.

Spray soft-bodied pests, like aphids and spider mites, with a strong stream of water to reduce pest numbers or spot treat heavily infested areas with Safer’s® Soap for immediate control.

Seed Saving Instructions

Marigolds will produce lots of seed in a similar fashion to zinnia or calendula. When the blooms dry out, cut them off and hang upside down in bundles. The seeds are contained in the heads and, once dry and crisp, can be hand-crushed and winnowed from the seed chaff.

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