The Pride-Of-Barbados Becomes The Pride-Of-Texas!

For images, go to: http://horticulture.tamu.edu:7998/superstar/
and SEARCH for “Pride of Barbados”.

The Pride-Of-Barbados has long been a favorite for hot tropical landscapes where it provides a fiesta of vibrant color throughout the year. Even botanists recognized this plant’s beauty as the word “pulcherrima” in the scientific name, Caesalpinia pulcherrima, means very pretty. This Caribbean native celebrates the warm summer season, hitting its stride in flowering during the toughest part of summer when most of our color plants are languishing in the dog-day sun. Some of the alternate common names, such as flame tree, peacock flower, and flowering fence hint at its showy nature.

Spectacular terminal racemes up to 20 in. long begin to appear in spring in south Texas, during summer in central and north Texas. Individual flowers open progressively from the base of the raceme to the tip with the longest pedicles on the lower flowers, giving the raceme a cone or pyramidal-shaped outline. Racemes last for an extended time as the individual florets sequentially open up the stem. Florets are 1½ to 2 in. wide with five showy red to orange, occasionally yellow, petals arranged like a shallow cup with bright red stamens extending 2 in. beyond the petals. Cool looking waxy lima bean-shaped 3 to 6 in. long pods follow the flowers, starting green, flushing red, and eventually turning shiny brown. One can either enjoy the fruit development or deadhead the spent flowers to hasten the next flush of blooms. As if the flowers were not showy enough on their own, nature has made them attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies which add movement and excitement to the summer spectacle.

Even when not in bloom, the foliage of Pride-Of-Barbados is interesting, offering soft textured very finely divided broad bipinnately compound leaves 8 to 15 in. long. The numerous fine textured lush dark green to blue-green leaflets contrast well with the coarse branching pattern of its shrubby growth habit and the intricate red, orange, and yellow flowers. Some of the select seed lines with strongly blue-green foliage are even more handsome than the species type.

Growth habits and uses vary by region of the state. Pride-Of-Barbados is sometimes planted as a barrier hedge as some of the older stems develop stiff prickles, hence its use in the tropics as a showy natural fence. Along the Gulf Coast and in south Texas, Pride-Of-Barbados can be used as a semi-evergreen hedge or limbed up as a small tree. A bit further north in El Paso, Austin, College Station, and Houston it may serve as a herbaceous perennial returning from the roots after mild winters. For the rest of the state it makes an outstanding annual summer accent, providing flowers during the hottest part of the year. Pride-Of-Barbados makes a great summer replacement for transition season plantings or can add spicy colors to mixed or single species patio or dooryard pots. Culture is easy as all one needs is a sunny spot with about any well drained soil. For nurserymen, the key to good growth is to start plants as soon as possible in a warm greenhouse as plants grow rapidly, but languish in cool temperatures. Also, avoid over-watering to reduce the potential for root rots.

Regardless of your location in the state, Pride-Of-Barbados will make your list of summer favorites as one of the most spectacular of the Texas Superstar™ promotions. For a total listing of Texas SuperStars, see: http://www.plantanswers.com/superstar_listing.htm

Prepared by Michael Arnold, 6/3/07

“Pride of Barbados”
A Great Heat Loving Plant and Future Texas SuperStar

Pride of Barbados, Caesalpinia pulcherrima is a member of the pea family (Fabaceae). It is referred to by other names including Barbados Flowerfence, Peacock Flower, Mexican Bird of Paradise, Dwarf Flamboyan, Caesalpinia, and Dwarf Poinciana. The species name pulcherrima literally means “very pretty” and this plant definitely lives up to the name. The blooms of Pride of Barbados are incredible with terminal flower clusters showing an orange-red with a tinge of gold on the edges. Each flower is composed of five showy petals with very prominent six inch long red stamens. This makes the Pride of Barbados one of the most attractive heat loving plants for San Antonio!

Pride of Barbados is an evergreen shrub or small tree in frost free climates, a deciduous shrub in zone 9, and a returning perennial in zone 8. In the tropics it gets 15-20′ tall and its ungainly, wide spreading branches can cover about the same width. The cultivation of Pride of Barbados in San Antonio is usually a semi-dwarfed hardy perennial shrub to a typical size of 5-8′ tall and growing that large even after freezing to the ground the previous winter. The stem, branches and petioles are armed with sharp spines and the leaves are fernlike and twice compound, with many small, oval leaflets. Pride of Barbados flower lives up to its name with incredibly showy blossoms of orange and red. The flowers are bowl shaped, 2-3″ across, with five crinkled, unequal red and orange petals, and ten prominent bright red stamens that extend way beyond the corolla. The flowers are borne in terminal clusters 8-10″ tall throughout most of the year in tropical climates and in late summer and fall where frosts occur. There also are forms with yellow and forms with dark red flowers. The fruits, typical legumes, are flat, 3-4″ long, and when ripe they split open noisily to expose the little brown beans.

Pride of Barbados is believed to be native to the West Indies and tropical America. It is widely cultivated and has escaped cultivation and become established in tropical regions throughout the world, including South Florida. The selection of Pride of Barbados that we desire here in San Antonio is a smaller dwarf compact selection named Dwarf Poinciana, Pride of Barbados. Local collaboration of regional propagation sources will be increasing adequate numbers of available plant material in the next two years. Once suitable numbers become available, the Pride of Barbados selection of the Dwarf Poinciana plant will be officially release in the spring of 2008 as a Texas SuperStar plant. It obviously meets all the criteria of a Texas SuperStar Plant.

Pride of Barbados is very easy to grow in alkaline to acidic, well-drained soils. This is a fast growing, but short lived plant. It is moderately tolerant of salty conditions. Pride of Barbados flowers benefit from pruning, and can be shaped to tree form or shrubby bush form. These plants prefer full sun to partial shade. Pride of Barbados flowers bloom best in full sun. Also, Pride of Barbados is considered drought tolerant once established.

Within the USDA Zones of 8 – 11, Pride of Barbados dies to the ground following frost or freezing temperatures, but in zone 8B, at least, it comes back reliable, albeit late, in middle spring. Don’t give up on it! Pride of Barbados has survived temperatures as low as 18 F. It can be grown as an annual in colder climates. Even under frost free conditions, Pride of Barbados may lose its leaves when temperatures drop into the 40’s. Pride of Barbados is easy to start from seeds. Germination will be speeded up if the seeds are nicked with a file before planting. Under good growing conditions, Pride of Barbados will self sow and may even become weedy.

The striking orange red flowers are an attention grabber and butterflies love them! Use Pride of Barbados as a specimen or in a mixed shrub border. It has an open, spreading habit and the branches sometimes get too long for their own good and break off. Still, a row of Pride of Barbados makes a showy, fine-textured screen or informal hedge. You can cut Pride of Barbados to the ground in late winter or early spring to get a bushier, more compact shrub.

There are some 70 species of Caesalpinia in tropical regions worldwide. They were formerly placed in the genus Poinciana, but that genus name is no longer used. We all can’t grow the tropical, Royal Poinciana (Delonix regia), considered to be the most beautiful tree in the world, but for gardeners in zones 8 and 9, the selection of Pride of Barbados (a.k.a. Dwarf Poinciana) is a close second and for sure a number one future Texas SuperStar winner here for San Antonio.

Prepared by David Rodriguez, Bexar County Cooperative Extension Horticulturist
=========================================================================

QUESTIONS RECEIVED BY PLANTanswers.com

Question: Will deer eat Pride of Barbados?

Answer: At: http://www.plantanswers.com/radio_subject_matter.htm under the heading of: #36: Deer and Pride of Barbados

Question: Does Pride of Barbados attract hummingbirds?

Answer: It is listed at: http://www.plantanswers.com/hummingbird_plants.htm as a hummingbird attractor. Calvin Finch writes: Poinciana, also known as Pride of Barbados, is even more popular with butterflies and hummingbirds than ‘Gold Star’ esperanza. It has an airy, open growth pattern and glow-in-the-dark orange-red and yellow blooms. Like Yellow Bells, poinciana blooms without summer irrigation. The plant is not a favorite deer food but they will eat it to the ground in some situations.

Caesalpinia pulcherrima ‘Aurea’ (Barbados pride ‘Aurea’)

Botanical name

Caesalpinia pulcherrima ‘Aurea’

Other names

Barbados pride ‘Aurea’, Yellow Barbados pride, Yellow Barbados flower fence, Dwarf poinciana ‘Aurea’, Flamboyant tree ‘Aurea’, Yellow peacock flower, Yellow paradise flower, Dwarf yellow poinciana

Genus

Caesalpinia Caesalpinia

Variety or Cultivar

‘Aurea’ _ ‘Aurea’ is a tender, erect, evergreen shrub or small tree bearing long-stalked, bipinnate leaves with elliptic, light green leaflets and, from spring to autumn, erect racemes of bowl-shaped, yellow flowers with long, protruding, yellow stamens.

Native to

Tropical Americas

Foliage

Evergreen

Habit

Erect, Open stems

Toxicity

Flowers and seeds are toxic if ingested.

Create your free Shoot garden

Create your free SHOOT garden and make a record of the plants in your garden.

Add your own photos, notes, get monthly email reminders on how to care for your plants, and connect with other gardeners. Get started now.

Colour

Flower

Yellow in Spring; Yellow in Summer; Yellow in Autumn

Light green in All seasons

How to care

Watch out for

Specific pests

Glasshouse red spider mite , Glasshouse whitefly , Mealybugs

Diseases

Generally disease-free.

General care

Pruning

Pruning group 8. Pruning group 13 if wall-trained.

Propagation

Sow seed in spring at 13-18C. Prior to sowing, soak seed in warm water for 24 hours.

Propagation methods

Seed, Softwood cuttings

Get access to monthly care advice

Create a free SHOOT account and get instant access to expert care advice for this and other plants in your garden.

You’ll also receive handy monthly email reminders of what needs doing. Create your free account.

Where to grow

Caesalpinia pulcherrima ‘Aurea’ (Barbados pride ‘Aurea’) will reach a height of 6m and a spread of 4m after 10-20 years.

Suggested uses

Architectural, Beds and borders, City, Conservatory, Containers, Flower Arranging, Greenhouse, Indoor, Sub-Tropical, Wallside and trellises

Cultivation

Under glass, grow in loam-based compost in full light. Water moderately & feed monthly. May need restrictive pruning after first flush of flowers. Outdoors in frost-free areas, grow in fertile, moist but well-drained soil in full sun.

Soil type

Chalky, Clay, Loamy, Sandy (will tolerate most soil types)

Soil drainage

Moist but well-drained

Soil pH

Acid, Alkaline, Neutral

Light

Full Sun

Aspect

South, West

Exposure

Sheltered

UK hardiness Note: We are working to update our ratings. Thanks for your patience.

Indoor heated (H1), Tender in frost (H3)

USDA zones

Zone 10, Zone 9, Zone 8

Peacock Flower Tree Gardening in Spain

Peacock flower tree is very easy to grow in alkaline to acidic, well-drained soils. This is a fast growing plant and moderately tolerant of salty conditions.

Delonix Regia Flamboyant Seeds.

The Spanish Gardening Index Page
The Caesalpinia pulcherrima is another stunning small tree/large shrub that thrives in warm climates or even the desert.

Also known as ‘Peacock flower’, ‘Mexican (or red) bird of paradise’ or ‘Pride of Barbados’, this tropical plant can reach heights of up to 15 feet (3 m). Peacock flower is the most widely cultivated species in the genus Caesalpinia.

It is a striking ornamental plant, widely grown in domestic and public gardens. It is a species of flowering plant in the pea family

(Fabaceae) and the species name pulcherrima translates to mean “very pretty”.

Like many other plants, Peacock flower has escaped cultivation and become established in warm climate regions throughout the world.
Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Pride of Barbados, Red Bird of Paradise, Peacoc 10 seeds
Native to the tropics and subtropics, it flourishes during summer when the weather is hottest and other vegetation fades.

Peacock flower is an evergreen shrub or small tree in frost free climates, a deciduous to semi-deciduous shrub in areas with only occasional, slight frost, and a returning perennial in temperate climates with mild winters (down to 19°F (-7°C).

This exotic plant is used extensively for its extravagant, showy flowers and its incredible heat tolerance.

The flowers are borne in terminal clusters 8-10″ (20-25 cm) tall throughout most of the year in tropical climates and in late summer and fall where frosts occur.

The most common colours are red and orange or a combination of red and yellow, but there are also forms with pure yellow flowers (often called yellow bird of paradise) and forms with flowers in shades of pink.

The inch-wide flowers have slightly ruffled petals and 10 long, red protruding stamens as accents (except the pure yellow form).

As the inflorescence elongates, it produces new flowers at the top 1/3, and promptly sheds the lower old flowers.

The pods form quickly at the bottom of the inflorescence, and the flower buds open a few at a time, so that buds, flowers, and seed pods appear simultaneously.

The fruits are legumes looking very much like pea pods, but they are poisonous. As they mature they turn hard and brown and when ripe they split open noisily releasing the brown beans.

Culture
Peacock flower is very easy to grow in alkaline to acidic, well-drained soils. This is a fast growing plant and moderately tolerant of salty conditions.

Fertilizer application is hardly necessary, especially if it is grown in adequately mulched soils.

Peacock Tree Yellow

Light: This plant enjoys full sun to light shade and loves heat. Best growth and flower production is in full sun. It gets leggy in shade and blooming is reduced.

Moisture: Peacock flower is drought tolerant once established, but performs best with regular irrigation while blooming.

Hardiness: Even under frost free conditions Peacock flower may lose some of its leaves when temperatures drop to 50-40°F (10-5°C), but it recovers quickly.

It can also survive a yearly freeze. Peacock flower dies to the ground following periods of mild frost, but it comes back reliable, albeit late, in middle spring.

Don’t give up on it! Peacock flower has survived temperatures as low as 18°F (-7.8°C). It can be grown as an annual in colder climates.

Propagation: Peacock flower is easy to start from seeds. Germination will be speeded up if the seeds are nicked with a file before planting. Under good growing conditions, peacock flower tree will self sow or spread by root suckers (not invasive though).

Pruning: Peacock flower benefits from pruning, and can be shaped to tree form or shrubby bush form.

It grows quickly before flowering, but while flowering growth virtually stops. Prune to any desired height in late autumn or winter to control height and spread.

THIS IS WHERE YOU MIGHT Discover that SPECIAL wildlife and nature holiday on a once in a lifetime Safari Tour in places such as Africa & the Middle East, The Americas & Caribbean, OR Asia & Oceania.===Find and compare safaris and wildlife tours from 796 organizers worldwide!

To get a bushier, more compact shrub you can even cut Peacock flower to the ground in winter and will recover nicely.

It flowers on new wood so do not prune in the spring as this could delay flowering until September, meaning four to five months of flowering loss.

Usage
The striking flowers are an attention grabber!

Use peacock flower as a specimen or in a mixed shrub border.

Also useful as a quick screen – a line of peacock flowers makes a showy fine-textured screen or informal hedge. Great for summer colour and a tropical effect. Peacock flower Tree.
Caesalpinia Pulcherrima Seeds

Family: CAESALPINIACEAE
Height: 3.0-4.0m
Packet content (approximately): 10
Beautifully fringed, orange and red blooms cover this magnificent, West Indian shrub which has most attractive deeply divided foliage.

In a warm country or very well-protected UK garden or a conservatory, it makes one of the most spectacular plants you can ever be lucky enough to grow.

Gardening Spain tips tricks Mediterranean

Index Accommodation Spanish Holiday Find out about Areas

36,18,Peacock flower Tree.

Peacock Tree Caesalpinia pulcherrima thrives well in our warm Spanish climate.

Spain info covers local towns with local accommodation. Spain info also covers info local days out in Spain on the Mediterranean. Spain info with information on gardening in Spain Mediterranean style. Spain info with information on cooking Mediterranean style.
Spain info also covers Bowls Clubs Golf Go Karting fishing Caves and other sports here in the Mediterranean.
Spain info also lists the Local Hot Water Spas many of them dating back to Roman times.

Spain Info Peacock flower Tree San Francisco De Asis, Urb Marina, San Fulgencio, 03177, Alicante, Spain.38n21, 0w29.

Pride of Barbados

Caesalpinia

There are two very common species of Caesalpinia in the nursery trade: pulcherrima and gillesii, and both are quite beautiful.

Caesalpinia pulcherrima is most commonly known as Pride of Barbados or Red Bird of Paradise. It has orange-yellow flowers and is a little bushier than Caesalpinia gillesii, which is most commonly known as Yellow Bird of Paradise, because it has all yellow flowers.

Both plants love the heat, need full sun, and prefer very well-drained soil. These plants will bloom all summer long with very little supplemental irrigation, so be careful not to overwater them. Both plants may freeze to the ground in winter, but not always.

For many gardeners, the Yellow Bird of Paradise doesn’t freeze to the ground in winter. If it does, just cut it back, and it will return in spring.

Pride of Barbados, the orange flowered one (Red Bird of Paradise) is more frost tender, and does freeze to the ground in our winters more often than not. Usually it will return in spring but younger plants may be slower to emerge.

Both plants can get up to about 8 feet tall, but Pride of Barbados is generally a little shorter and bushier, mostly due to the fact that it freezes to the ground most years. And both plants get about 4 to 6 feet wide, so give them plenty of room.

Both plants attract hummingbirds and butterflies and are considered to be deer resistant.

categories:

“Pride of Barbados”-A Great Heat Loving Plant and Future Texas SuperStar

Sunday, June 11, 2006

By: David Rodriguez
(Photos: aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu)

Pride of Barbados, Caesalpinia pulcherrima is a member of the pea family (Fabaceae). It is referred to by other names including Barbados Flowerfence, Peacock Flower, Mexican Bird of Paradise, Dwarf Flamboyan, Caesalpinia, and Dwarf Poinciana. The species name pulcherrima literally means “very pretty” and this plant definitely lives up to the name. The blooms of Pride of Barbados are incredible with terminal flower clusters showing an orange-red with a tinge of gold on the edges. Each flower is composed of five showy petals with very prominent six inch long red stamens. This makes the Pride of Barbados one of the most attractive heat loving plants for San Antonio!

Pride of Barbados is an evergreen shrub or small tree in frost free climates, a deciduous shrub in zone 9, and a returning perennial in zone 8. In the tropics it gets 15-20′ tall and its ungainly, wide spreading branches can cover about the same width. The cultivation of Pride of Barbados in San Antonio is usually a semi-dwarfed hardy perennial shrub to a typical size of 5-8′ tall and growing that large even after freezing to the ground the previous winter. The stem, branches and petioles are armed with sharp spines and the leaves are fernlike and twice compound, with many small, oval leaflets. Pride of Barbados flower lives up to its name with incredibly showy blossoms of orange and red. The flowers are bowl shaped, 2-3″ across, with five crinkled, unequal red and orange petals, and ten prominent bright red stamens that extend way beyond the corolla. The flowers are borne in terminal clusters 8-10″ tall throughout most of the year in tropical climates and in late summer and fall where frosts occur. There also are forms with yellow and forms with dark red flowers. The fruits, typical legumes, are flat, 3-4″ long, and when ripe they split open noisily to expose the little brown beans.

Pride of Barbados is believed to be native to the West Indies and tropical America. It is widely cultivated and has escaped cultivation and become established in tropical regions throughout the world, including South Florida. The selection of Pride of Barbados that we desire here in San Antonio is a smaller dwarf compact selection named Dwarf Poinciana, Pride of Barbados. Local collaboration of regional propagation sources will be increasing adequate numbers of available plant material in the next two years. Once suitable numbers become available, the Pride of Barbados selection of the Dwarf Poinciana plant will be officially release in the spring of 2008 as a Texas SuperStar plant. It obviously meets all the criteria of a Texas SuperStar Plant.

Pride of Barbados is very easy to grow in alkaline to acidic, well-drained soils. This is a fast growing, but short lived plant. It is moderately tolerant of salty conditions. Pride of Barbados flowers benefit from pruning, and can be shaped to tree form or shrubby bush form. These plants prefer full sun to partial shade. Pride of Barbados flowers bloom best in full sun. Also, Pride of Barbados is considered drought tolerant once established.

Within the USDA Zones of 8 – 11, Pride of Barbados dies to the ground following frost or freezing temperatures, but in zone 8B, at least, it comes back reliable, albeit late, in middle spring. Don’t give up on it! Pride of Barbados has survived temperatures as low as 18 F. It can be grown as an annual in colder climates. Even under frost free conditions, Pride of Barbados may lose its leaves when temperatures drop into the 40’s.
Pride of Barbados is easy to start from seeds. Germination will be speeded up if the seeds are nicked with a file before planting. Under good growing conditions, Pride of Barbados will self sow and may even become weedy.

The striking orange red flowers are an attention grabber and butterflies love them! Use Pride of Barbados as a specimen or in a mixed shrub border. It has an open, spreading habit and the branches sometimes get too long for their own good and break off. Still, a row of Pride of Barbados makes a showy, fine-textured screen or informal hedge. You can cut Pride of Barbados to the ground in late winter or early spring to get a bushier, more compact shrub.

There are some 70 species of Caesalpinia in tropical regions worldwide. They were formerly placed in the genus Poinciana, but that genus name is no longer used. We all can’t grow the tropical, Royal Poinciana (Delonix regia), considered to be the most beautiful tree in the world, but for gardeners in zones 8 and 9, the selection of Pride of Barbados(a.k.a. Dwarf Poinciana) is a close second and for sure a number one future Texas SuperStar winner here for San Antonio. Check it out!!!

Remember, Learn and Have Fun!

David Rodriguez is an Extension Horticulturist representing Texas Cooperative Extension with the Texas A&M University System. For any landscape or gardening information, call the Bexar County Master Gardeners [email protected] at (210) 467-6575, email questions to [email protected], or visit our County Extension website at http:bexar-tx.tamu.edu

Plant of the Week: Pride of Barbados

As people visit other parts of Texas I’m asked to identify this plant that they’ve seen in their journeys. It’s one of the showiest of all of our landscaping plants, and everyone wants to have one of their own.

Pride of Barbados in a street median proves it handles heat well.

Its names…
• Botanically it’s Caesalpinia pulcherrima.
• Pride of Barbados,
• Red bird of paradise,
• Mexican red bird of paradise,
• Dwarf poinciana
• Peacock flower (OK – I’ve never really heard that one, but I read it.)

Continued Below Advertisement

It’s hard to pass up the brilliant orange-red shades of this plant.

Its hardiness and habits…
• Evergreen large shrub or small tree in sub-tropical Deep South Texas.
• Deciduous shrub in Zone 9.
• Returning perennial in Zone 8 (may die to ground).
• Annual most years in Zone 7.

How best to use it…
• Plan on it growing to 5 to 7 ft. tall.
• Full sun, even reflected heat – it’s tough!
• Perfect drainage, but not particular as to soil type.
• Drought-tolerant, but will respond well to regular watering so long as soil drains well.
• Grow where its spines won’t be offensive to pedestrian traffic.
• Blooms all summer and well into fall.
• Can be started from seed or bought from local nurseries in spring and early summer.
• Great for attracting hummingbirds and butterflies.

One of my Facebook friends Sandra Keyes posted this beautiful image of a Monarch caterpillar on a pride of Barbados – looking for a milkweed plant, no doubt.

A somewhat hardier species, Caesalpinia gillesii, is known as yellow bird of paradise.

Posted by Neil Sperry

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *