Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’

  • Whole Plant Traits: Plant Type: Tree Leaf Characteristics: Deciduous Habit/Form: Rounded Spreading Growth Rate: Medium Texture: Medium
  • Fruit: Fruit Color: Black Red/Burgundy Fruit Length: < 1 inch Fruit Width: < 1 inch Fruit Description: Fruits are ovoid, less than an inch in diameter, and are red maturing to black.
  • Flowers: Flower Color: Pink White Flower Inflorescence: Corymb Flower Value To Gardener: Showy Flower Bloom Time: Fall Spring Winter Flower Description: Flowers in fall, winter during warm spells, and early spring; rose colored buds open to soft pink single to semi-double flowers fading to almost white. Inflorescence is a congested corymb, pedicels are elongated, rachis is very short and gives the appearance of an umbel.
  • Leaves: Leaf Characteristics: Deciduous Leaf Type: Simple Leaf Arrangement: Alternate Leaf Shape: Lanceolate Oblong Ovate Leaf Margin: Doubly Serrate Serrate Hairs Present: No Leaf Description: Leaves are simple, alternate, ovate to lanceolate to oblong-ovate, acuminate, cuneate, and serrate to doubly serrate. Petioles are short, scabrate, bearing two or more large wart-like glands on the petiole apex, or more glands in intact with the blade base or on the blade margin near the base.
  • Stem: Stem Is Aromatic: No

Prunus X Subhirtella Stock Photos and Images

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  • Prunus x subhirtella ‘Stellata’. Prunus ‘Pink Star’ . Cherry tree blossom
  • Spring flowers on Prunus x subhirtella autumnalis.
  • Spring flowers on Prunus x subhirtella autumnalis.
  • Prunus x subhirtella ‘Stellata’. Prunus ‘Pink Star’ . Cherry tree blossom
  • Spring flowers on Prunus x subhirtella autumnalis.
  • Prunus x subhirtella pendula rubra, Weeping Cherry tree. Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire, England
  • Spring Cherry blossoms (Prunus x subhirtella), Ile-de-France, France
  • Spring flowers on Prunus x subhirtella autumnalis.
  • Blossoming Cherry tree (Prunus x subhirtella) during snowfall, Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria
  • Macro image of a Winter flowering Cherry tree blossom (Prunus x subhirtella Autumnalis)
  • Cherry, Rosebud cherry ‘Autumnalis’, Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autmnalis’, Winter Cherry pink blossoms growing outdoor.
  • Prunus x subhirtella var ascendens ‘Flore Pleno’
  • Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autumnalis Rosea’
  • Cherry, Rosebud cherry ‘Autumnalis’, Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autmnalis’, Winter Cherry pink blossoms growing outdoor.
  • Prunus × subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’. Blooms of this winter flowering cherry, also called Prunus ‘Autumnalis Alba’ – January, UK
  • Flowers of Prunus X subhirtella autumnalis ‘Rosea’. Winter flowering cherry tree. Ornamental garden tree. Powys, Wales. February
  • Cherry, Rosebud cherry ‘Autumnalis’, Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autmnalis’, Winter Cherry pink blossoms growing outdoor.
  • Prunus × subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’. Blooms of this winter flowering cherry, also called Prunus ‘Autumnalis Alba’ – January, UK
  • PRUNUS X SUBHIRTELLA PENDULA RUBRA AT WESTONBIRT ARBORETUM
  • Cherry, Rosebud cherry ‘Autumnalis’, Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autmnalis’, Winter Cherry pink blossoms growing outdoor.
  • Prunus × subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’. Blooms of this winter flowering cherry, also called Prunus ‘Autumnalis Alba’ – January, UK
  • Flowers of Prunus X subhirtella autumnalis ‘Rosea’. Winter flowering cherry tree with snow.
  • Urban Winter flowering cherry (Prunus x subhirtella) tree, London
  • Prunus × subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’. Blooms of this winter flowering cherry, also called Prunus ‘Autumnalis Alba’ – January, UK
  • Urban Winter flowering cherry (Prunus x subhirtella) tree, London
  • Pink flowering cherry, Prunus Accolade. Pink semi-double flowers of ornamental early spring blossoming hybrid tree
  • Prunus × subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’. Winter blossoms of Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis in January, UK. Also called Prunus ‘Autumnalis Alba’.
  • Urban Winter flowering cherry (Prunus x subhirtella) tree, London
  • Macro image of a Winter flowering Cherry tree blossom (Prunus x subhirtella Autumnalis)
  • Prunus × subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’. Winter blossoms of Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis in January, UK. Also called Prunus ‘Autumnalis Alba’.
  • Urban Winter flowering cherry (Prunus x subhirtella) tree, London
  • Pink flowering spring cherry Accolade, Prunus serrulata (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring, Bavaria
  • Prunus × subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’. Winter blossoms of Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis in January, UK. Also called Prunus ‘Autumnalis Alba’.
  • Early spring flowers of the hybrid flowering cherry, Prunus ‘Pandora’, a Prunus subhirtella ‘Ascendens Rosea’ and P x yedoensis cross
  • Pink flowering spring cherry Accolade, Prunus serrulata (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring, Bavaria
  • Prunus x subhirtella – `Autumnalis Rosea’ AGM TRS068813
  • Early spring flowers of the hybrid flowering cherry, Prunus ‘Pandora’, a Prunus subhirtella ‘Ascendens Rosea’ and P x yedoensis cross
  • Pink flowering spring cherry Accolade, Prunus serrulata (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring, Bavaria
  • Spring, blossoming of a tree, Yoshino cherry or Tokyo cherry, Prunus x yedoensis, Rosaceae, Germany, wine home, mountain road,
  • Early spring flowers of the hybrid flowering cherry, Prunus ‘Pandora’, a Prunus subhirtella ‘Ascendens Rosea’ and P x yedoensis cross
  • Pink flowering spring cherry Accolade, Prunus serrulata (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring, Bavaria
  • Spring, blossoming of a tree, Yoshino cherry or Tokyo cherry, Prunus x yedoensis, Rosaceae, Germany, wine home, mountain road,
  • Early spring flowers of the hybrid flowering cherry, Prunus ‘Pandora’, a Prunus subhirtella ‘Ascendens Rosea’ and P x yedoensis cross
  • Rosebud Cherry (Prunus x subhirtella) ‘Autumnalis Rosea’ close-up of flowers with snow growing in garden Powys Wales January
  • Prunus ‘Pandora’ Pale pink blossoms of Chery ‘Pandora’ in mid spring – UK. Hybrid of P. subhirtella ‘Ascendens Rosea’ and P. x yedoensis.AGM
  • Pandora Cherry, Flowering Cherry (Prunus ‘Pandora’, Prunus Pandora), buds of cultivar Pandora
  • Branch, pink flowering spring cherry Accolade, Prunus serrulata (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring
  • Winter Cherry Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’
  • Pandora Cherry, Flowering Cherry (Prunus ‘Pandora’, Prunus Pandora), flower of cultivar Pandora
  • Blossom growing on the trunk bark, Yoshino Cherry, Prunus x Yedoensis (Speciosa x Subhirtella), Savill Garden, UK
  • Winter Cherry Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’
  • Prunus subhirtella ‘Stellata’in flower
  • Blossom growing on the trunk bark, Yoshino Cherry, Prunus x Yedoensis (Speciosa x Subhirtella), Savill Garden, UK
  • Winter Cherry Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’
  • Prunus subhirtella ‘Stellata’in flower
  • Cherrytree (Prunus x subhirtella ‘autumnalis’)
  • Winter Cherry Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’
  • Prunus subhirtella ‘Stellata’in flower
  • Rosaceae, Prunus x subhirtella ‘Pendula Rosea’, Spring Cherry, grey-brown weeping branch tip, single pale pink flowers borne in dense clusters.
  • Accolade flowering cherry, Prunus sargentii x subhirtella, Adorning to cherry Accolade, Prunus sargentii x subhirtella , Accolade flowering cherry /
  • Prunus subhirtella ‘Stellata’in flower
  • Rosaceae, Prunus x subhirtella, ‘Autumnalis Rosea’, Spring Cherry, grey-brown stem, deep pink double flowers opening in clusters, young leaves emerging.
  • Accolade flowering cherry, Prunus sargentii x subhirtella, Adorning to cherry Accolade, Prunus sargentii x subhirtella , Accolade flowering cherry /
  • Prunus subhirtella ‘Stellata’in flower
  • Cherry Tree Blossom – Prunus Accolade
  • Spring cherry Accolade, Early ornamental cherry, Japanese cherry (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring, Bavaria, Germany
  • Tokyo Sherry, Yoshino cherry, Potomac cherry (Prunus x yedoensis, Prunus yedoensis, Prunus speciosa x Prunus subhirtella), blooming, Germany
  • Cherry Tree Blossom – Prunus Accolade
  • Spring cherry Accolade, Early ornamental cherry, Japanese cherry (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring, Bavaria, Germany
  • Tokyo Sherry, Yoshino cherry, Potomac cherry (Prunus x yedoensis, Prunus yedoensis, Prunus speciosa x Prunus subhirtella), blooming, Germany
  • Cherry Tree Blossom – Prunus Accolade
  • Spring cherry Accolade, Early ornamental cherry, Japanese cherry (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring, Bavaria, Germany
  • Cherry Tree Blossom – Prunus Accolade
  • Tokyo Sherry, Yoshino cherry, Potomac cherry (Prunus x yedoensis, Prunus yedoensis, Prunus speciosa x Prunus subhirtella), blooming, Germany
  • Cherry Tree Blossom – Prunus Accolade
  • Spring cherry Accolade, Early ornamental cherry, Japanese cherry (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring, Bavaria, Germany
  • Cherry Tree Blossom – Prunus Accolade
  • Spring cherry Accolade, Early ornamental cherry, Japanese cherry (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring, Bavaria, Germany
  • Cherry Tree Blossom – Prunus Accolade
  • Tokyo Sherry, Yoshino cherry, Potomac cherry (Prunus x yedoensis, Prunus yedoensis, Prunus speciosa x Prunus subhirtella), blooming, Germany
  • Spring cherry Accolade, Early ornamental cherry, Japanese cherry (prunus sargentii x subhirtella accolade), flowers in spring, Bavaria, Germany
  • Prunus x subhirtella, blossom on branch
  • Autumn cherry (Prunus subhirtella x sargentii ‘Accolade’)
  • Flower of Autumn Cherry Tree
  • Prunus x subhirtella ‘Stellata’, deciduous tree with pink spring flowers and green leaves
  • Autumn cherry (Prunus subhirtella x sargentii ‘Accolade’)
  • Flowering cherry
  • Prunus x subhirtella ‘Pendula Rubra’, syn. Prunus pendula, deciduous tree with deep pink spring flowers on hanging branches
  • Autumn cherry (Prunus subhirtella x sargentii ‘Accolade’)
  • Flowering cherry
  • Prunus x subhirtella ‘Pendula Rosea Plena’ tree with abundance of pink flowers set against blue sky
  • Autumn cherry (Prunus subhirtella x sargentii ‘Accolade’)
  • Flowering cherry
  • Tokyo Sherry, Yoshino cherry, Potomac cherry (Prunus x yedoensis, Prunus yedoensis, Prunus speciosa x Prunus subhirtella), shor
  • Autumn cherry (Prunus subhirtella x sargentii ‘Accolade’)
  • Flowering cherry
  • Rosebud Cherry (Prunus x subhirtella) ‘Autumnalis Rosea’, close-up of flowers, growing in garden, Powys, Wales, February
  • Autumn cherry (Prunus subhirtella x sargentii ‘Accolade’)
  • Accolade flowering cherry / (Prunus sargentii x subhirtella) | Zier Kirsche ‘Accolade’ / (Prunus sargentii x subhirtella) /
  • Illustration of Prunus x subhirtella (Spring Cherry), one half covered in leaves, the other half bare

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Winter beauty: Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’

More importantly, its flowers have a delicacy and charm completely unknown to the more showy spring-flowering cherries – the less-than-subtle ‘Kanzan’, for example, which you will come across in every park and along every suburban avenue.

A broad, spreading, deciduous tree, Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’ is capable of reaching a height of 8m (26ft) at maturity, but usually attains rather less. The leaves are 7cm (2¾in) long, oval and sharply toothed. The flowers are pink in bud, semi-double, 1cm (½in) across, pendulous, held in small clusters and white when fully opened, although they acquire pink tones as they fade.

Unlike spring-flowering cherries, ‘Autumnalis’ flowers in flushes between November and March or even April, only being temporarily halted by cold weather. This tree is frequently to be found in lists of plants flowering in public gardens on New Year’s Day. The flowers are not profusely carried but, nevertheless, look good against a blue sky, and gladden the heart when there is so little else of colour in the garden.

The autumn leaf colour is also rather better than in many other ornamental cherries. And these trees are also extremely hardy. For example, they grow well along the burn at Kailzie Gardens, near Peebles in the Scottish Borders, which is 210m (700ft) above sea level and experiences comparatively harsh winters.

The similar, and possibly showier, Prunus x subhirtella ‘Autumnalis Rosea’ has red-budded, pale pink flowers which fade towards white with age. Both these trees can be grown either as specimens or as constituents of mixed borders, since they only cast a light shade. If grown in rough grass, the obvious accompaniments for the flowers in late winter and early spring are snowdrops, aconites, crocuses and early narcissi.

Since the trees merge into the background in the summer, they can be used as supports for clematis or not-too-vigorous climbing roses. In autumn, they associate very well with autumn flowerers, such as the pink and white varieties of Anemone x hybrida as well as border sedums and Cyclamen hederifolium.

These trees are usually sold as 1.2m (4ft) to 1.8m (6ft) tall standards, but it also possible to find them offered as bare-root trees (as for example from Ornamental Tree Nurseries), and these are cheaper and available now, as the trees are becoming dormant.

Matthew Tanton-Brown, nursery manager at The Place for Plants in Suffolk, is a big fan, although he warns that, like all Prunus, they are surface-rooters, which can be a disadvantage if you plant a tree in the lawn.

He recommends that a tree should be planted into a large square hole, rather than the more conventional round one. The reason for this is to encourage roots to spread outwards, once they hit the corners, rather than simply growing round and round, as if the tree were in a giant container. This tree likes a position in full sun in a reasonably fertile soil and, though hardy, it makes sense to plant it where it will be sheltered from cold winter winds. It should not need much pruning but any work should be done on a dry summer day.

‘Autumnalis’ is, as a rule, longer-lived than many of the Japanese ornamental cherries. Two closely related cherries flower in early spring – ‘Fukubana’ in Barbie pink and Prunus pendula ‘Pendula Rubra’ with brick-red flowers. But, at that time of year, they are likely to lose out to the larger-flowered Japanese cherries, except to connoisseurs of the elegant and understated.

Best Winter Pinks

An unlikely seeming colour in winter, pink flowers pop up on a surprising number of shrubs, their brightness welcome against the prevailing brown and grey.

Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’ has pretty, single, extremely fragrant, flowers, white edged with pink, in November and December, on an upright shrub, which can be container-grown. It does best in a sheltered, warm spot.

Daphne bholua is a richly scented December to March Himalayan flowering shrub. ‘Peter Smithers’ has purple buds and pinkish-purple flowers on semi-evergreen shrubs.

The similar ‘Jacqueline Postill’ is more widely available.

Erica carnea ‘December Red’ is a lime-tolerant, winter-flowering heather, with pinkish-red flowers from December to early spring on a 15cm (6in) tall plant.

Erica x darleyensis is also lime-tolerant and winter-flowering. ‘Kramer’s Rote’ has striking magenta flowers from January and bronzed foliage in spring.

Viburnum x bodnantense ‘Dawn’ begins flowering in October and does not cease until February or March.

Viburnum farreri ‘Compactum’ is deliciously fragrant and, at less than 1m (3ft 3in) tall, suitable for small gardens.

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Buy Prunus × subhirtella ‘Autumnalis Rosea’ from gardenshop.telegraph.co.uk

Telegraph wins award

Celebrations among the team: The Telegraph Gardening pages have won, for the second year running, the prestigious Garden Writers’ Guild Newspaper of the Year 2007. The judges commended Gardening for “the perfect balance of inspirational articles and highly relevant practical information”.

Photographer Jonathan Buckley won the award for Single Image of the Year; columnist Ursula Buchan won Enthusiasts’ Book of the Year for Garden People (Thames & Hudson); and Matthew Wilson, our Buzzwords columnist, won Practical Book of the Year for his RHS New Gardening (Mitchell Beazley) – both available from Telegraph Books on 0870 428 4112 or go to books.telegraph.co.uk.

Congratulations, one and all.

It’s a rainy weekend. Rainy winter days are usually warmer in this river valley than dry ones. Brighter too, than the days when the veil of fog hangs on till after lunch, opening like the shutter on a camera to show an all too fleeting picture of pale blue winter sky and lemon-yellow sunlight.

Though not as cold as some mornings, we are gathered in the kitchen where the fire is. From the window we can see the winter flowering cherry. This is no spring flower come early. We are yet to have the shortest day. Despite frosts this tree clothes its leafless branches with delicate, just pink, ruffled blossoms in readiness for the longest night.

Ours winter flowering cherry is dwarfed beside a red flowering gum (actually pink flowering) and not far from the car-port. It is in the foreground for the neighbour and the background for me. I’m jealous of the neighbours bedroom window-full view of it such that I have plans to plant another.

It’s been in this garden for as long as I can remember. A clever gardening woman gave it to my parents as a wedding gift. It has a spreading habit, its branches are angled at about 45 degrees from the ground starting from the base of the tree and thus it’s foot-print is fairly large. It does not get larger than 8 metres high. It flowers twice, prolifically in June, and then again, with fewer blossoms in spring. It’s leaves go gold and orange in autumn. It doesn’t produce a cherry worth mentioning. It has no scent to speak of. It originates from Japan, but is the consequence of cultivation and is unknown in the wild.

My sister once pretend married my cousin under it on her June birthday when she was six or so and my cousin, disguised in a rubbery mask of a fleshy old man, eight. What other plant gives you wedding blossoms to marry under in June?

I bring a branch or two indoors. In a cold room (which most of the rooms in this house are in winter) it will remind you of a world and a time beyond the fog for at least a week.

I infinitely prefer the subtlety of the winter flowering cherry to the heavy make-up of some of the larger and more abundant spring flowering Barbie-pink prunus trees.

They say one should plant it in a square hole rather than a round one, to encourage the roots to spread out.

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