Rose Campion Care: How To Grow Rose Campion Flowers

Rose campion (Lychnis coronaria) is an old-fashioned favorite that adds brilliant color to the flower garden in shades of magenta, bright pink and white. Rose campion flowers look at home in cottage garden settings and more. Read on to learn more about these interesting plants.

Rose Campion Information

Native to northern Africa, southern Europe and the Middle East, rose campion has become naturalized in many parts of the United States. It grows naturally on rocky, scrubby hillsides. The plants do well in rock gardens, xeriscaping, wildflower meadows and cottage gardens.

The genus name ‘Lychnis’ (Greek for lamp), comes from the fact that the felt-like leaves were used as lamp wicks in olden days. The soft, pale, gray-green foliage makes the perfect backdrop for the brightly colored flowers, with each blossom lasting only a day. The foliage adds soft texture in the garden when the flowers are not in bloom.

Flowers are sparse

the first year but numerous in the second year. In the third year, the numbers of blossoms begin to decline, but they are eager reseeders that regenerate themselves every year.

Rose Campion Care

Growing rose campions is a snap if you choose the right location. The plants prefer full sun but tolerate partial shade, where they produce fewer blossoms. The plants survive winters in USDA plant hardiness zones 4 through 8, but they may not survive particularly severe winters in zone 4.

Rose campion prefers poor, dry soil over rich soil, and tolerates alkaline or calcareous soil. Dry soil is best, but the plants may need supplemental watering during extended dry periods. If you have to water, apply the moisture slowly, making sure the water sinks deep into the soil.

The seeds need a chilling period before they will germinate, so plant them in the fall for spring germination. If you live in an area that typically has warm periods in fall and winter, plant the seeds in winter, several weeks before the last expected frost date. The seeds need light to germinate, so press them onto the surface of the soil without covering them.

Deadhead the plant regularly to keep the flowers blooming. To encourage the plant to reseed itself, remove the mulch from areas where you want seedlings to take root, and leave the last flush of summer flowers in place to form seed heads. In spring, thin the seedlings and move some of the excess to other locations.

The only additional care the plants need is late fall or early winter pruning. Cut them back to about one-third of their original size. The trimmings are fine for the compost pile.

Rose Campion Stock Photos and Images

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  • Rose campion, Lychnis coronaria Gardeners ‘World ‘Blych’
  • Rose campion red flowers Lychnis coronaria
  • Lychnis coronaria: rose campion Caryophyllaceae
  • Rose campion, Lychnis coronaria Gardeners’ World ‘Blych’
  • Rose campion red blossom Lychnis coronaria
  • Lychnis Coronaria or Rose Campion in late summer border, England UK
  • Rose campion, Lychnis coronaria Gardeners ‘World ‘Blych’
  • Rose Campion, Purpurklätt (Silene coronaria)
  • Lychnis Coronaria or Rose Campion in late summer border, England UK
  • Rose Campion, Purpurklätt (Silene coronaria)
  • Bright Pink flowers and silvery foliage of Lychnis coronaria; Rose Campion, Dusty miller
  • Rose Campion, Crown Pink, Mullein pink, Dusty Miller (Lychnis coronaria, Silene coronaria), flower
  • Lychnis coronaria. Rose campion flowers
  • Rose campion Lychnis coronaria
  • Summer scenery with flowering wild Rose campion (Lychnis coronaria, Caryophyllaceae, Mullein pink). Besapari Hills, Bulgaria
  • Lychnis coronaria
  • Flowerbed with Rose campion Lychnis coronaria as backgroung
  • Silvery foliage and red-pink flowers ofthe summer flowering perennial rose campion, Lychnis coronaria
  • Rose campion, Lychnis coronaria Gardeners ‘World ‘Blych’
  • Rose Campion, Crown Pink, Mullein pink, Dusty Miller (Lychnis coronaria, Silene coronaria), flower
  • Rose campion red flowers Lychnis coronaria
  • Rose Campion (Lychnis coronaria, Silene coronaria)
  • Rose Campion, Crown Pink, Mullein pink, Dusty Miller (Lychnis coronaria, Silene coronaria), blooming in a flower bed
  • A male Brimstone butterfly (Gonepteryx rhamni) feeding on a rose campion (Lychnis coronaria) flower. Bedgebury Forest, Kent, UK.
  • Rose Campion (Lychnis coronaria, Silene coronaria)
  • A male Brimstone butterfly (Gonepteryx rhamni) feeding on a rose campion (Lychnis coronaria) flower. Bedgebury Forest, Kent, UK.
  • Lychnis coronaria Alba,white-flowered rose campion,flowers,flowering,perennial,garden,RM Floral
  • Lychnis Coronaria or Rose Campion in late summer border, England UK
  • A male Brimstone butterfly (Gonepteryx rhamni) feeding on a rose campion (Lychnis coronaria) flower. Bedgebury Forest, Kent, UK.
  • Lychnis coronaria Alba,white-flowered rose campion,flowers,flowering,perennial,garden,RM Floral
  • Lychnis Coronaria or Rose Campion in late summer border, England UK
  • Rose Campion (Silene coronaria) flower
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  • Rose Campion, Purpurklätt (Silene coronaria)
  • Rose Campion, Crown Pink, Mullein pink, Dusty Miller (Lychnis coronaria, Silene coronaria), leaves
  • Lychnis coronaria Alba,white-flowered rose campion,flowers,flowering,perennial,garden,RM Floral
  • VARIOUS COLOUR FORMS OF ROSE CAMPION (LYCHNIS CORONARIA syn Silene coronaria is a species of flowering plant in the carnation family Caryophyllaceae
  • Rose Campion, Crown Pink, Mullein pink, Dusty Miller (Lychnis coronaria, Silene coronaria), corona
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  • Rose campion, Lychnis coronaria, Hoverfly collecting nectar from flower.
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  • Close view of crimson flower of Rose campion, Lychnis coronaria with another behind.
  • Rose campion, covered with rain drops
  • Lychnis coronaria Gardeners World,rose campion,foliage,tropical,exotic border,bed,planting scheme,mix,mixed,combination,RM Floral
  • Skipper butterfly on Rose campion flower, Pink eyed Lychnis coronaria D’oculata Group, of white colour flushed with pink.
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  • Lychnis Coronaria or Rose Campion shrub
  • Rose campion, covered with rain drops
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  • Studio Rose Campion Flower – UK
  • Rose campion, covered with rain drops
  • Lychnis coronaria Gardeners World,rose campion,foliage,tropical,exotic border,bed,planting scheme,mix,mixed,combination,RM Floral
  • Rose Campion. Lychnis Coronaria, showing single, deep magenta flower, after rainfall
  • Rose campion, covered with rain drops
  • Lychnis coronaria Gardeners World,rose campion,foliage,tropical,exotic border,bed,planting scheme,mix,mixed,combination,RM Floral
  • Close up of single white and pink Rose campion, Lychnis coronaria, flower with blurred background, Dirleton Castle Garden, East Lothian, Scotland, UK
  • Eryngium planum Blaukappe,sea holly,sea hollies,Lychnis coronaria Alba,white-flowered rose campion,geranium rozanne, achillea filipendulina cloth of g
  • Rose Campion (Lychnis coronaria) flower. Central Balkan National Park. Bulgaria.
  • Rose Campion, Crown Pink, Mullein pink (Lychnis coronaria, Silene coronaria) Caryophyllaceae, close-up, macro.
  • Lychnis coronaria Alba,white-flowered rose campion,geranium rozanne,white blue planting scheme,mixed combination,perennial flowers,flowers,flowering,p
  • Rose Campion (Lychnis coronaria) flower. Central Balkan National Park. Bulgaria.
  • The flower of a white-flowered rose campion (Lychnis coronaria ‘Alba’)
  • Eryngium planum Blaukappe,sea holly,sea hollies,Lychnis coronaria Alba,white-flowered rose campion,geranium rozanne, achillea filipendulina cloth of g
  • Rose Campion (Lychnis coronaria) flower. Central Balkan National Park. Bulgaria.
  • Rose Campion
  • Lychnis coronaria Alba,white-flowered rose campion,geranium rozanne, achillea filipendulina cloth of gold,white blue yellow planting scheme,mixed comb
  • White-flowered rose campion (Lychnis coronaria ‘Alba’)
  • Lychnis coronaria Gardeners’ World,Rose campion,colocasia pink china,senecio cristobalensis,foliage,tropical,exotic border,bed,planting scheme,RM Flor
  • Hoverfly on a pink rose campion bloom
  • White-flowered rose campion (Lychnis coronaria ‘Alba’)
  • Tickseed Coreopsis verticillata ‘Grandiflora’ Rose Campion Lychnis coronaria
  • Rose Campion (Lychnis coronia), scabious and Poppies in full bloom.
  • Rose Campion, Silene Lychnis coronaria Bloody Mary Lampflower Mullein
  • A close up of a white-flowered rose campion (Lychnis coronaria ‘Alba’)
  • Rose Campion, Silene coronaria Bloody Mary Lampflower Mullein Pink flowers
  • rose campion flower,(Bridget-in-her-bravery), with early morning dew. Lychnis coronaria, Silene coronaria.
  • The pink flower of the Dusty Miller or Rose Campion (Silene coronaria) plant in an English garden during summer
  • Close up of Silene coronaria ‘Rose campion’, Caryophyllaceae fam. Aka dusty miller, mullein-pink, bloody William, and lamp-flower. Water droplets
  • The flower of a rose campion (Lychnis coronaria)
  • Purple rose campion flower in the garden
  • Close up of Silene coronaria ‘Rose campion’, Caryophyllaceae fam. Aka dusty miller, mullein-pink, bloody William, and lamp-flower. Water droplets
  • The flower of a rose campion (Lychnis coronaria)
  • Summer scenery with flowering wild Rose campion (Lychnis coronaria, Caryophyllaceae, Mullein pink). Besapari Hills, Bulgaria
  • Lychnis coronaria, Rose Campion, in flower
  • The flower of a rose campion (Lychnis coronaria)
  • Summer scenery with flowering wild Rose campion (Lychnis coronaria, Caryophyllaceae, Mullein pink). Besapari Hills, Bulgaria
  • A close up of a rose campion (Lychnis coronaria) flower
  • Lychnis coronaria, Rose Campion, in flower
  • Summer scenery with flowering wild Rose campion (Lychnis coronaria, Caryophyllaceae, Mullein pink). Besapari Hills, Bulgaria
  • Lychnis coronaria, Rose Campion, in flower
  • Rose campion (Lychnis coronaria) in bloom, in june, perennial plant.
  • Heath fritillary Mellicta athalis feeding on rose campion
  • Lychnis coronaria ‘Alba’, White Rose Campion, in flower
  • Bee killer beetle Trichodes apiaris feeding on rose campion
  • Lychnis coronaria, Rose Campion and Lychnis coronaria ‘Alba’, White Rose Campion in bloom
  • Rose Campion/ Crown Pink / Mullein Pink / Dusty Miller bloom showing details of flower structure – Lychnis coronaria
  • Large skipper Ochlodes venatusmale taking nectar from rose campion
  • Lychnis coronaria, Rose Campion and Lychnis coronaria ‘Alba’, White Rose Campion in bloom
  • Close-up of Rose Campion/ Crown Pink / Mullein Pink / Dusty Miller flower – Lychnis coronaria – Family Caryophyllaceae

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Plant of the Week: Rose Campion

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture does not promote, support or recommend plants featured in “Plant of the Week.” Please consult your local Extension office for plants suitable for your region.

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Rose Campion
Latin: Lychnis coronaria

Rose Campion is an old fashioned flower that inserts itself with ease in and around the garden. (Photo courtesy Gerald Klingaman)

Something old, something new, something borrowed, something – well – neon pink. Rose Campion (Lychnis coronaria) is one of those old-fashioned plants that many gardeners kind of know, but it is surprising how seldom it is seen in the garden.

Rose Campion is a short lived perennial of the pinks family that originally came from southwestern Europe but has been so long grown in gardens it is found in most temperate climates around the world. It is clump-forming with wooly, mullen-like leaves that are elliptical in outline and about 5 inches long. When not in flower, the leaves cluster in a tight rosette but as the flower stalks emerge they are arranged opposite each other up the round stem, getting smaller as the stem elongates.

When in flower in late spring and early summer the plants reach 30 inches tall and wide with an open, airy look. The five-petaled flowers are to 1.5 inches across with the petals overlapping to form a saucer like blossom. Colors typically are in shades of hot pink, neon colored rose, white or graduated blends of white to pink. The black seeds are produced in plentitude in a peanut sized capsule if allowed to develop.

Rose Campion has been grown in gardens for at least 2,000 years. Its modern day Latin name is a direct translation from the name used for it by the Greek physician Dioscorides (40 – 90 AD) in his De Materia Medica which served as the go-to source for medicinal advice for 1,500 years and was the basis for most of the herbals that began to appear after 1550 when the printing press made such books possible. According to Dioscorides the name Lychnis is used because the plant leaves were wound together and used as a wick for oil lamps. The epitaph is “coronaria” refers to its use in making garlands. The good doctor advised soaking the seeds in wine and using it to treat the unfortunate soul bitten by a scorpion.

Though Rose Campion is a beautiful plant that has been grown in the Americas since at least 1596, it is rarely seen in the modern garden. Though seeds are offered in catalogs it has been primarily preserved as a pass-along plant amongst grandmothers who appreciate its no-fuss, no-muss staying power. It doesn’t work well in nursery containers because it is shy flowering until well established in the ground and most gardeners are reluctant to buy plants without flowers.

Rose Campion grows well in any good garden soil in full sun locations. Though it will tolerate dry conditions once established it needs moisture during the germination and early establishment period. It tolerates both acidic and alkaline soils. Seeds are best sown where the plant is to grow by broadcasting them in early fall. If started indoors, seeds require light and three weeks of moist chilling to ensure uniform germination.

If Rose Campion plants are cut back before the seeds mature it may be possible to force a second flush of blooms during midsummer. Shearing the plants back after flowering will prevent the plants from reseeding and thus encourage the perennial tendencies of the original plant. Because Rose Campion plants are iffy, especially in areas with high humidity and heavy clay soils that tend to be wet over winter, many gardeners grow this plant as a winter annual with seeds planted in the fall and then rip it out once seeds have dispersed during the following summer.

By: Gerald Klingaman, retired
Retired Extension Horticulturist – Ornamentals
Extension News – May 18, 2012

The University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture does not maintain lists of retail outlets where these plants can be purchased. Please check your local nursery or other retail outlets to ask about the availability of these plants for your growing area.

Magenta and white-flowered rose campion, Lychnis coronaria.

Rose campion is one of about 20 species of perennials and biennials in the genus Lychnis. This group in the pink family (Caryophyllaceae) is closely related to – and is sometimes included in – the genus Silene. The genus Lychnis, from the northern temperate zone, is quite variable, but all species have vividly-colored flowers. The genus name, used by Theophrastus from the Greek work lychnos which means “lamp”, is thought to refer to the use of the woolly leaves as lamp wicks in ancient times. The common name of rose campion supposedly comes from the use of its flowers to make garlands for athletic champions.

L. cornonaria (also known by the synonyms Agrostemma coronaria, Coronaria coriacea and Silene coronaria) has small but showy, deep pink to fuchsia to magenta or white blossoms. It is a short-lived perennial or biennial from southeastern Europe hardy in zones 4-10. Most plants do not survive harsh winters after flowering, but it does readily self seed to perpetuate a planting. Despite its short life span, rose campion is certainly worth growing.

The leaves of rose campion are covered with fine hairs for a fuzzy appearance.

Sometimes called Dusty Miller for the soft, silvery-gray, velvet-like foliage (one of several completely different plants known by this common name), it forms Verbascum-like rosettes of leaves the first year and spreading mounds 2-3 feet tall in subsequent years. The greenish-grey-white stems and leaves are densely covered with silver-grey hairs, giving a fuzzy appearance. The opposite, lance-shaped leaves may be as long at 3” but are usually shorter. Plants remain evergreen in mild climates.

This plant has a strong upright habit (even leggy in rich soils) when it begins to flower. A profusion of flowers up to 1” across are produced in summer. The simple 5-petaled flowers occur in small heads (terminal cymes) held well clear of the foliage. The petals are typically in vivid shades of pink or hot magenta that contrast nicely with the silvery foliage.

Rose campion combines well with many other plants.

Rose campion combines nicely with pink, lilac, purple, and blue flowers and contrasts well with bright yellow flowers. It can also be paired with other magenta flowers such as winecups (Callirhoe involucrata) or phlox. The silver foliage helps tone down the intense flower color, and provides good contrast to dark green or purple-foliaged plants and variegated leaves. Use it with bright orange and yellow in a “hot” garden, or mix with pastels for a cooler effect. Try mixing it with petunias and Vinca minor as an annual planting. It can be planted around bulbs to hide the yellowing foliage. A single plant can perk up a border, while a group or mass of plants will provide a swath of subtle color.

The silver foliage in early spring.

As with many silver-foliaged plants, rose campion prefers fairly dry, well-drained conditions in full sun or partial shade, but will tolerate clay and moist soil. Deadhead regularly to encourage continuous flowering or shear after the initial flowering to promote a second flush of flowers later in the season. Removing the dead or faded flowers may also help overwintering. This plant has few insect or disease problems, and is not bothered by deer.

Rose campion adds a splash of bright color.

Rose campion is easiest to propagate from seed. It produces copious amounts of seed and will readily self-seed. To encourage self-seeding, don’t mulch around the plants. Leave the ground undisturbed around dead plants and seedlings will appear in spring. Thin the seedlings or transplant to other areas in late spring when large enough to handle. Space plants about 12-15” apart. The distinctive seedlings are easy to identify and easy to pull out if you don’t want them. Basal cuttings can also be taken in late spring.

A white L. coronaria flower.

A number of cultivars are available:

  • ‘Abbotsford Rose’ has rose-colored flowers.
  • ‘Alba’ has white flowers and a weaker growth habit.
  • ‘Angel Blush’ has white flowers with a pink blush.
  • ‘Atrosanguinea’ has very light foliage and deep magenta flowers.
  • ‘Dancing Ladies’ is a mixture of white and carmine, usually with a darker eye.
  • ‘Flora Plena’ has double flowers.
  • ‘Oculata’ has white flowers with a pink or red eye.

– Susan Mahr, University of Wisconsin – Madison


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Care-free perennials: rose campion

The hue of rose in the flowers is actually a shocking magenta, which perfectly suits the plants’ frosty gray, felted foliage. But quieter colours are available as well. Easy to grow and always willing to self-sow, rose campion features 2.5-centimetre-wide (inch-wide), flat, velvety flowers held aloft on stiff, angular branches.

Best of all, rose campion has a modest appetite and easily withstands drought and neglect. Blooming in summer, rose campion thrives in sun but adapts easily to partial shade where summers are very hot. Rose campion plays well with other silvery foliage plants that have a lacier texture, such as artemisia or dusty miller. Or use it in a pastel border of campanulas, lavender, catmint and yarrow to liven up the scene. The right shade of pink petunia will echo the colour of rose campion, helping it flow through the garden in style. It also looks particularly fine lined up single file where its stems can be silhouetted against evergreen shrubs or a dark-coloured fence or building.

There’s good news for those who’d like to capitalize on rose campion’s toughness but find the magenta flowers too shocking. There is the soft-hued ‘Alba’, with small white flowers and sage-gray foliage. ‘Angel’s Blush’ is similar, but each flower has a centre of light blushing pink. If you want to see an array of shades and are willing to start from seed, try ‘Diamonds and Rubies’, a grab-bag seed mix of several flower colours.

Over the last few years, I’ve been trying different “filler” plants to grow between the perennials until they mature.
Rose campion (Lychnis coronaria) is now one of my favorites for this role.
I have several clumps spread throughout my deer resistant gardens where it keeps company with stachys, salvia, spirea, lavender, nepeta and agastache. Annual larkspur, sown from seed in the fall, has joined the rose campion as a filler plant.
The fuzzy, silver foliage of rose campion is tall enough (two to three feet) to send the flowering branches above other plants along the slopes in the gardens. The base is a rosette of fuzzy leaves and the spiking branches pop out above the base. In my zone 7b garden, the foliage is evergreen during the winter months.

Besides being deer and rabbit resistant, it is a drought tolerant, easy-keeper! After the blooms have finished, I cut back the spikes to the base foliage. It blooms again, but not as full as the first bloom.
Although it reseeds, but there hasn’t been a population explosion in my garden due to my dead-heading. I need to leave a few more flowers for more seedlings this time. I have found a few tiny rosettes around the mother plants and have easily relocated those to fill in gaps while waiting for perennials to mature. In fact, the seedlings even sprouted among the rocks in the dry stream! This old-fashioned plant is short-lived and suitable for sunny locations in zones 3-9.
My original rose campion was purchased in pots from a garden nursery, but you can sow the seeds directly in the fall as the seeds like a little chill. This makes it a great seed to sow at the same time as annual larkspur and poppies.

Story and photos by Freda Cameron; Location: home garden; May 2009

Plant Combination: Rose Campion (Lychnis coronaria) and Spanish Lavender (Lavandula stoechas)

Rose campion provides a long season backdrop for many plants and Spanish lavender is one of the most striking. Both plants have attractive silver gray foliage all season into winter but make their biggest impact in the garden when they burst into bloom in spring. The bright purple flowers of Spanish lavender create a vivid color combination with the magenta flowers of rose campion that appear at the same time. By deadheading rose campion, its flowering can be extended to much of the summer. And when the flowers are gone Spanish lavender is a handsome plant with fine foliage that provides a pleasant contrast in texture to rose campion’s coarser woolly leaves. Grow in full sun, average to lean, medium moist, well-drained soil.

Rose Campion (Lychnis coronaria)Rose campion is a clump forming biennial or short lived perennial that naturalizes easily by self-seeding. The woolly leaves are up to three inches long and form a basal rosette which is attractive as a ground cover before and after the blooms appear. The one inch wide flowers have five petals and are carried high on gray green fuzzy stems bearing relatively small leaves. Several cultivars are available varying is color from white to dark crimson and include bi-tones.

Bloom Time: Late spring to early summer
Size: 2-3’ H x 1-1.5” W
Hardiness: Zones 4-8

Spanish Lavender (Lavendula stoechas)Also called French lavender, this native of Mediteraean Europe and North Africa has fine evergreen aromatic foliage that remains attractive all year long. Although less hardy than English lavender it is more suitable for hot humid areas. It has very unique flower heads consisting of a dense spike of dark purple flowers two inches long with two or more upright bright lavender purple sterile bracts that give the flower the appearance of a rabbit. By pruning Spanish lavender after flowering a dense attractive habit can be maintained. Although of great culinary interest Spanish lavender is used for its scent.

Bloom Time: Late spring to early summer
Size: 1-3’ H x 1-3’ W
Hardiness: Zones 7-9.

Lychnis coronaria is a superb plant for a sunny border. Rosettes of soft silver-grey felted leaves make a very useful plant in the garden, they contrast well with the vivid magenta flowers which appear in late summer. Thriving in dry soils and full sun it associates well with other grey leaved foliage plants such as artemisia.
It can be grown as a border plant or as part of a mixed perennial display. Lychnis will produce a big showy display that maintains interest in the border at a time when many other plants are flagging.
Lychnis coronaria is a clump-forming perennial but often grown as a biennial as it is short lived but does seed itself. This attractive sun loving perennial prefers a relatively fertile dry soil in full sun, but is an all round tough plant that is very suitable for problem areas, it tolerates full sun and sandy, drought-prone soils and is suitable for exposed coastal planting.
In his book “Garden Flowers”, Christopher Lloyd dared his readers to “… allow the magenta-flowered Lychnis coronaria to seed itself around a colony of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’. I haven’t taken the dare myself, but can visualise a festival of fiery attention grabbers wildly dancing for our appreciation”.
Lychnis coronaria was awarded the RHS Award of Garden Merit (AGM) in 1993.

Sowing:
Sow in late winter to late spring or in late summer to autumn at temperatures around 20 to 24°C (68 to 70°F). Sow the seeds into trays, cells or pots containing good quality seed compost.
Sow on the surface and do not cover, as light aids germination of seeds. Water from the base of the tray.
Place in a propagator or warm place, ideally at 20 to 24°C (68-70°F). Keep the compost moist but not wet at all times. Germination 21 to 30 days.
Prick out each seedling as it becomes large enough to handle, transplant into 7.5cm (3in) pots or trays. Gradually acclimatise to outdoor conditions for 10 to 15 days before planting out, space 15cm (6in) apart.

Cultivation:
Grow in any moderately fertile, well-drained soil in full sun or partial shade. Overwatering or prolonged summer rain in heavy ground may cause rotting. Grows best in full sunlight but will tolerate shade for part of the day.
Apply a generous 5 to 7cm (2 to 3in) mulch of well-rotted compost around the base of the plant in early-spring. A little complete plant food may be given in early spring.
It is worth keeping in mind that these plants are short lived perennials or biennial, so although they usually self-seed freely, the plant will only live for a couple of years.
If you do not want plants to self seed deadhead as the flowers fade. This should also prolong blooming. Cut back the faded flowerheads in late autumn after they have released their seed.

Plant Uses:
City/Courtyard Gardens, Coastal, Cottage/Informal Garden, Flowers Borders and Beds, Low Maintenance, Patio/Container Plants or Prairie Planting

Origin:
Lychnis coronaria is native to Asia and South-eastern Europe. It is a species of flowering plant in the carnation family, Caryophyllaceae.

Nomenclature:
Pronounced LIK-nis ko-ro-NAH-ree-uh, The thick woolly leaves of this species were once used as lamp wicks, which contributed to its Genus name Lychnis, it is derived from the Greek word lychnos, meaning ‘lamp’, in reference to its historic use as a lamp wick.
It is believed the epithet coronaria, comes from its meaning crown. (the word literally means ‘used for’ or ‘belonging to garlands’) however, it could be a derivative of the French word, campagne, which means country.
In many places of the world it is also referred to as Silene coronaria. Silene is related species and another member of the carnation family, Caryophyllaceae
Common names include Dusty Miller (this also refers to Centaurea cineraria and Senecio cineraria), Mullein-pink, Rose Campion, and Bloody William.

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