Madame Lemoine Lilac

Planting & Care for Deciduous Shrub – Lilacs

Preparation

  • Lilac flowers best in full sun but tolerates light shade.
  • Choose an open site, protected from strong, drying winds, where air circulates freely, to reduce risk of leaves becoming mildewed.
  • These shrubs need well-drained, organically rich soil.
  • Avoid chalky spots, which may cause lime-induced chlorosis, when leaves turn creamy yellow and die.
  • Plant Lilacs March-November

Opening Plant Material

  • Bare Root – Cut open the bundle (top and roots are tied) and separate all the plants. Soak roots in buckets of water until planted. Each plant type will be labeled separately for identification. Do not expose the roots to sun. They should never dry out. Keep roots covered. All bare-root plants must be trimmed when planted.
  • Grow Bags – Remove bag by using a utility knife to slit up the side and peel off the fabric exposing the soil and roots. Plant the root ball just like you would a container plant. No trimming of roots is necessary for grow bags.
  • B&B – Soak root ball very well. Dig a hole at least 6″ wider and no deeper than the size of the ball on the plant. Rotate the plant to the proper position. Never lift or move trees by the tops.
  • Containers – Completely saturate all container plants by putting in a larger container of water until stops bubbling, remove. Now ready to plant. Dig a hole no deeper than the depth of the container and 6″ or more, making sure it’s wider on the sides.

Planting Bare Root

  • Plant Bare root in fall. A good indicator if you can still plant is if the ground is still workable you’re good to go. If a hard frost is expected be sure to hold off on planting.
  • Dig a hole at least 6″ wider and the same depth as the root mass. The crown or graft of the plant should be slightly higher than ground level where it was grown at the nursery.
  • Trim off the broken roots and branches.
  • Place fertilizer packets in hole (if purchased). Do not place other fertilizers in the planting hole. *Use Our Recommended Fertilizer.
  • Spread the roots and fill halfway with soil, then water until soil settles completely saturating the soil and planting pit.
  • Re-adjust plant and fill the hole with the rest of the soil.
  • Back fill the balance of the soil and water well.
  • See our link below “Handling & Planting Guidelines” for illustrations on planting.

Planting Grow Bags

  • Plant grow bags in spring or fall.
  • Notice where the base of the trunk flairs out from the tree. This is called the root flair. This root flair should show when the tree is planted. If necessary, add soil under the ball so the root flair is exposed.
  • Place fertilizer packets into the bottom of the hole (if purchased). *Use Our Recommended Fertilizer.
  • Backfill the hole with soil, making sure the top of the root ball is visible and slightly higher than the soil around it.
  • Firm the soil around the plant. Water well to settle soil around the root ball.

Planting B&B trees

  • Plant B&B trees in spring or fall. A good indicator if you can still plant is if the ground is still workable you’re good to go. If a hard frost is expected be sure to hold off on planting.
  • Notice where the base of the trunk flairs out from the tree. This is called the root flair. This root flair should show when the tree is planted. If necessary, add soil under the ball so the root flair is exposed.
  • Place fertilizer packets into the bottom of the hole (if purchased). *Use Our Recommended Fertilizer
  • Backfill ½ of the hole with soil and completely saturate the soil with water.
  • Once the tree is straight and located as desired, cut and remove twine. Then, remove or bend back top ⅓ of metal basket. Lastly, remove exposed burlap from top of ball
  • Fill the hole to the top of the ball with soil, then soak well with water and let settle.
  • The top of the root ball should be visible and slightly higher than the soil around it.
  • Add mulch on top of soil making sure to not put mulch against the trunk or stems.
  • See our link below “Handling & Planting Guidelines” for illustrations on planting.

Planting containers

  • Slide plant from pot by tapping on the bottom of the pot.
  • With shovel or knife trim bottom 2″ off of the root ball for plants in plastic containers.
  • Rotate the plant to the proper position. Never lift or move plants by the tops.
  • Place the root ball in the hole.
  • Notice where the base of the trunk flairs out from the tree. This is called the root flair. This root flair should show when the tree is planted. If necessary, add soil under the ball so the root flair is exposed.
  • Place fertilizer packets into the bottom of the hole (if purchased). *Use Our Recommended Fertilizer.
  • Backfill the hole with soil, making sure the top of the root ball is visible and slightly higher than the soil around it.
  • Firm the soil around the plant. Water well to settle soil around the root ball.

Pruning – After Planting

  • Bare Root – Prune ALL bare root plants to reduce transplant shock and ensure success. Pruning should occur either before or as soon after planting as possible. All pruning should be done with a sharp pruning shears.
  • B&B, Grow Bags & containers – Although it is not essential for B&B, grow bags or containers to be pruned after planting, a light pruning for shape, to remove any broken branches from shipping, or to thin out a heavily branched plant will help in the transplanting process and in the appearance of your new planting.

Pruning – Through-out the Season

  • Prune in November & December – Cut out spent flowers when petals fade. Keep bushes youthful and blooming freely by pruning out a quarter of the older shoots each year in winter. Remove basal suckers.

Watering – After Planting

  • Plants typically take approximately 6 weeks to establish new roots in your soil. During this period, water plants as often as every 2-4 days at the start and at least a minimum of once per week.
  • Beyond the 6 week establishment period, water once per week, unless rains occur.
  • Stick your finger into the soil around 3” to check soil moisture.

Watering – Through-out the Season

  • After the first season, plants should only be watered during extended periods without rain.
  • How do you know if your plants need water? The easiest way to tell is to touch the soil around the roots. If it is moist, there is no need to water. If it is dry, give it a good soaking with the hose end (no nozzle) watering the soil only, not the leaves.
  • Stick your finger into the soil around 3” to check soil moisture.

Go to our “Plant Features & Video Tab” for more information & tips on caring and maintaining this plant.

Syringa Vulgaris ‘Madame Lemoine’ Hedging

Syringa vulgaris Madame Lemoine is the undisputed queen of double white lilac plants. Come May the hedgerows are filled with common purple lilac; Madame Lemoine makes an elegant counterbalance with large, clean white double flowers that shine out conspicuously from the heart shaped green foliage. Its flowers are a little larger than some of the best lilacs. They also last longer than many of the other white varieties so that they fill the floral gap in the season between the end of spring bulbs and the major summer blooms. Lilac is one of this country’s favourite smells (after lavender and lily of the valley) and Madame Lemoine’s heady scent should earn her a place in any scented garden. Lilacs are easy to grow and do well on any soil, even very chalky soils, and cope with full sun or partial shade. They survive even very low temperatures and require minimum maintenance: a mulch of muck in spring and a proper prune every other year. However the longevity of the flowers does mean that they tend to brown towards the end of their lives and so for the perfectionists amongst you some deft dead heading will not come amiss. An added advantage of so doing this that you will encourage more flowers to emerge.

Madame Lemoine, your new garden friend

There are various ways to treat with lilacs. They can be left to grow as a small specimen tree and will grow to a pleasing shape. Their scent will linger over a large area of your garden attracting butterflies and pollinating insects. If pruned harder or even pollarded to develop a multi-stemmed shrub and to keep its height and width under check, Madame Lemoine looks lovely in a border surrounded by aquilegias or Geranium ‘Johnsons Blue’ or contained by a clipped hedge of myrtle. Flower arrangers may want to cut down their lilacs to the ground after flowering so that the following year they are rewarded by the largest flowers possible and very little leaf. Lilacs should be a staple of every May flower arrangement and Madame Lemoine has the best vase life of all. For best results as they say, strip nearly all the leaves from the stem once you have picked it; sear the stem in boiling water for ten seconds; plunge the seared stem in cold water and leave overnight; arrange the next day. Although there is a bit of a lilac renaissance happening at the moment, lilacs are not planted as often as they deserve and part of the reason for this is because they are deemed a ‘one season’ plant because they only flower for a month or so. But the leaves are a pretty shape and you can use the tree or shrub as a frame to grow other climbers like a Polish Spirit or for a south facing tree the spectacular Dropmore Scarlet Honeysuckle. And if you would like to grow another lilac then Charles Joly has beautiful, contrasting burgundy flowers and a similarly stunning scent.

Features

  • Height: 6m
  • Spread: 4m
  • Colour: creamy white
  • Scent: Strong, sweet
  • Flowering: long lasting May/June
  • Flowers: double
  • Leaves: heart shaped, mid green

Lore about Madame Lemoine

The Lemoine family produced hundreds of lilac varieties in Nancy in the mid 19th Century. Unusually, Madame Marie Louise Lemoine helped her husband and son in their horticultural tasks and was responsible for hand-pollinating each tiny individual lilac flower. She deserved the eponymous tribute therefore of one of their best hybrids. But the Lemoine’s interests extended beyond lilacs and they introduced a lovely pink Madame Lemoine geranium as well as a multitude of other white flowers so beloved by brides Deutzia x lemoini with its small, bell-shaped white blooms, an herbaceous peony Mont Blanc which features big, fluffy white flowers on tall stems, the Anemone Honorine Jobert and several Philadelphus hybrids with their pure white, fragrant flowers with a scent reminiscent of orange blossoms.

Syringa vulgaris Mme Lemoine Plant in 9cm Pot Lilac

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They are excellent in chalky soil, Lilacs take 2-3 years to reach full flowering potential,Lilacs prefer full sun but will flourish in partial shade, They are not fussy as to soil as long as it is reasonably well drained. Syringa vulgaris Mme Lemoine Plant in 9cm Pot Lilac Lilac Syringa vulgaris Mme Lemoine Plant in 9cm Pot Lilac Plant in 9cm Pot Syringa vulgaris Mme Lemoine Syringa vulgaris Mme Lemoine Plant in 9cm Pot Lilac

EAN: : Does not apply: , Syringa vulgaris Mme Lemoine Lilac Plant in 9cm Pot, Syringa vulgaris Mme Lemoine – Lilac – Plant in 9cm Pot, Lilacs prefer full sun but will flourish in partial shade, Syringa vulgaris Mme Lemoine Plant in 9cm Pot Lilac, They are excellent in chalky soil, They are not fussy as to soil as long as it is reasonably well drained, Lilacs take 2-3 years to reach full flowering potential





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