Propagation Of Tulip Trees – How To Propagate A Tulip Tree

The tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) is an ornamental shade tree with a straight, tall trunk and tulip-shaped leaves. In backyards it grows up to 80 feet (24 m.) tall and 40 feet (12 m.) wide. If you have one tulip tree on your property, you can propagate more. Propagation of tulip trees is either done with tulip tree cuttings or by growing tulip tree from seeds. Read on for tips on tulip tree propagation.

Propagation of Tulip Trees from Seeds

Tulip trees grow flowers in the spring that produce fruit in the fall. The fruit is a grouping of samaras – winged seeds – in a cone-like structure. These winged seeds produce tulip trees in the wild. If you harvest the fruit in the fall, you can plant them and grow them into trees. This is one type of tulip tree propagation.

Pick the fruit after the samaras turn a beige color. If you wait too long, the seeds will separate for natural dispersal, making harvest more difficult.

If you want to start growing tulip tree from seeds, place the samaras in a dry area for a few days to help the seeds separate from the fruit. If you don’t want to plant them immediately, you can store the seeds in air tight containers in the refrigerator to use for tulip tree propagation down the road.

Also, when growing tulip tree from seeds, stratify the seeds for 60 to 90 days in a moist, cold place. After that, plant them in small containers.

How to Propagate a Tulip Tree from Cuttings

You can also grow tulip trees from tulip tree cuttings. You’ll want to take the tulip tree cuttings in the fall, selecting branches 18 inches or longer.

Cut the branch just outside of the swollen area where it attaches to the tree. Place the cutting in a bucket of water with rooting hormone added, per package directions.

When propagating a tulip tree from cuttings, line a bucket with burlap, then fill it with potting soil. Plunge the cut end of the cutting 8 inches deep in the soil. Cut the bottom out of a milk jug, then use it to cover the cutting. This holds in the humidity.

Place the bucket in a protected area that gets sun. The cutting should get roots within a month, and be ready for planting in spring.

Liriodendron tulipifera

  • Attributes: Genus: Liriodendron Species: tulipifera Family: Magnoliaceae Uses (Ethnobotany): Furniture stock, veneer and pulpwood Life Cycle: Woody Country Or Region Of Origin: Eastern North America Distribution: Vermont west to Michigan and Ontario west to Iowa south to Texas east to Florida north up through New England. Fire Risk Rating: low flammability Wildlife Value: Larval host plant for the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly. Hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, and birds like cedar waxwings feed on the nectar from flowers. White-tailed deer, gray squirrels, and some songbirds eat the flowers in the spring. Play Value: Attracts Pollinators Wildlife Food Source Wildlife Nesting Particularly Resistant To (Insects/Diseases/Other Problems): Resistant to fire. White-tailed deer browse the foliage and twigs, but this tree is considered to be moderately deer resistant. Dimensions: Height: 90 ft. 0 in. – 120 ft. 0 in. Width: 35 ft. 0 in. – 50 ft. 0 in.

  • Whole Plant Traits: Plant Type: Native Plant Tree Leaf Characteristics: Deciduous Habit/Form: Oval Pyramidal Rounded Growth Rate: Rapid Maintenance: Low Texture: Coarse
  • Fruit: Fruit Color: Brown/Copper Display/Harvest Time: Fall Fruit Type: Samara Fruit Length: 1-3 inches Fruit Width: < 1 inch Fruit Description: The tree produces and aggregate of fused, cone-like samaras (2-3″ long, 3/4″ wide) which turn brown separate at maturity throughout the winter. Oblong aggregate of samaras
  • Flowers: Flower Color: Gold/Yellow Green Orange Flower Value To Gardener: Edible Fragrant Flower Bloom Time: Spring Summer Flower Shape: Cup Flower Petals: 6 petals/rays Flower Size: 1-3 inches Flower Description: The Yellow Poplar has cup shaped, upright, fragrant yellow flowers with 6 green to yellow petals in 2 rows with an orange center that somewhat resembles a tulip. Flowers have numerous stamens and pistils are fused. Flowers have 3 reflexed sepals. Although the flowers are 1.5-2” in length, they can go unnoticed on large trees because the flowers appear after the leaves are fully developed. Sometimes the flowers are first noticed when the attractive petals begin to fall below the tree.
  • Leaves: Leaf Characteristics: Deciduous Leaf Color: Green Leaf Feel: Smooth Deciduous Leaf Fall Color: Gold/Yellow Leaf Type: Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately) Simple Leaf Arrangement: Alternate Leaf Margin: Entire Lobed Hairs Present: No Leaf Length: > 6 inches Leaf Width: > 6 inches Leaf Description: The Yellow Poplar has alternate, simple, palmately veined leaves with a smooth margin. Leaves have 3 main lobes. The apical love is broad and truncated, and lateral lobes have smaller lobes near the rounded or truncated base. Has a 2-4″ petiole. Some leaves will turn yellow and drop during drought. The bright green leaves (3-8” across and wide) with paler undersides turn golden yellow in fall.
  • Bark: Bark Color: Dark Brown Green Light Gray Surface/Attachment: Furrowed Ridges Smooth Bark Description: The bark is smooth and dark green on young trees. As the tree ages, wide, orange-brown furrows that separate flat ridges develop and bark color becomes brownish-gray. Rabbits eat the inner bark of young trees.
  • Stem: Stem Color: Brown/Copper Green Stem Is Aromatic: No Stem Description: Stems are green to reddish brown and have distinct stipular scars circumventing nodes. Buds are oval, flattened, green to reddish-brown in color, are shaped like a duck’s bill, and terminal buds are at most 1/2″ long.
  • Landscape: Landscape Location: Recreational Play Area Woodland Landscape Theme: Children’s Garden Edible Garden Native Garden Pollinator Garden Design Feature: Shade Tree Attracts: Bees Butterflies Hummingbirds Pollinators Songbirds Resistance To Challenges: Deer Fire Rabbits Problems: Frequent Disease Problems Frequent Insect Problems

Tulip Poplar

Additional information: Early North American explorers were impressed with the size of the tulip poplars discovered in the New World and used the long, straight logs to build cabins. Samples of the species were sent to Europe for cultivation and today tulip poplar is one of the most popular American trees grown in France and England.

After the Civil War, railroads accessing southern Appalachia were built and the massive logging of tulip poplar ensued. The wood is used for furniture, flooring, general construction, plywood and paper pulp.

Although the common name suggests it, tulip poplar is not a poplar but in the genus Liriodendron. Leirion is Greek for a lily and dendron is a tree. The specific epithet, tulipifera, refers to the shape of the flowers.

Tulip poplar has also been called canoe tree because Native Americans used it to make dugouts. The tulip poplar flower has a colorful base that guides bees to the flower’s source of abundant nectar. The nectar, also popular with hummingbirds, is a source of gourmet honey. Hydrochlorate of tulipiferene, an alkaloid and heart stimulant, is made from the inner bark of tulip poplar roots.

Tulip poplar’s fruit is an aggregate group of samaras. A samara is a seed with a wing. In winter, the upright, woody cores of the samara cones persist on branch tips after the samaras have been released.

Tulip-tree

Distribution

Tulip-tree is native to the deciduous forest of eastern North America which extends into Canada in southwestern Ontario in the region called the Carolinian zone or Carolinian Canada. Tulip tree was introduced to England from North America in the mid to late 17th century. Tulip-tree is one of only two species in the genus Liriodendron. The other, Liriodendron chinense is native to China and Vietnam.

Derivation of names

The genus name, Liriodendron, comes from the Greek leirion, meaning lily, and dendron, meaning tree. The species name, tulipifera, means tulip-bearing. The common name tulip-tree is also in reference to the flowers which somewhat resemble tulips. Tulip-tree is also called yellow-poplar, especially when referring to lumber. Despite its names, tulip tree is not related to lilies, tulips or poplar, but is in fact, closely related to magnolias!

Official status

Tulip-tree is the state tree of Indiana, Tennessee, and Kentucky.

Similar species

Tulip-tree leaves have occasionally been confused with maple leaves because both are lobed. However tulip-tree leaves have notched tips, pinnate veins and alternate branching, while maple leaves have pointed tips, palmate veins and opposite branching.

Human use

The wood of tulip-tree is commercially valuable and is used to make furniture, musical instruments, plywood, and pulp. Some Aboriginal peoples and early European settlers hollowed out the large, straight trunks to make canoes, and the roots were used medicinally.

Wildlife value

Tulip-tree’s flowers provide abundant nectar to bees, while the seeds feed squirrels, birds, rabbits, and deer. Deer and rabbits browse on saplings and young trees.

Tulip Tree Stock Photos and Images

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  • Tulip tree in autumn colours in UK
  • American tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), native to North America, close up of leaves in spring
  • African Tulip tree Kauai Hawaii
  • African Tulip Tree or Flame Tree; Spathodea Campanulata; near Akoakoa Point, Big Island of Hawai’i; USA
  • The flower of an African Tulip Tree in a tropical rainforest near Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaii
  • Orange flowers of the African Tulip Tree Kauai HI
  • A blossoming African tulip tree (Spathodea campanulata). Mexico. Tulipier du Gabon (Spathodea campanulata) en fleurs (Mexique).
  • African Tulip tree, Spathodea campanulata, and Candlenut Trees, Aleurites moluccana, on Maui
  • Tulip Tree
  • African tulip tree
  • Liriodendron tulipifera variegata. Variegated Tulip tree in autumn at Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire, England
  • Tulip Tree in Autumn Colour, Liriodendron, tulipifera, Magnoliaceae, North East USA, North America
  • tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), single tree in a park, Germany, North Rhine-Westphalia
  • Tulip tree – leaves in autumn colours – colourful foliage (Liriodendron tulipifera)
  • Liriodendron Tulipifera, Tulip Tree In Autumn, Tuliptree, Tulip Poplar, Yellow Poplar, Germany
  • Young leaf of American tulip tree on a branch (Tuliptree, Tulip Poplar, Whitewood, Fiddle-tree, Yellow Poplar)
  • Leaf of a tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) in Harrachpark in autumn, Bruck an der Leitha, Austria
  • Yellow throated Vireo at Nest in Tulip Tree Vertical
  • Tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera)
  • Tulip tree, Liriodendron tulipifera , Tulpenbaum (Liriodendron tulipifera)
  • liriodendron tulipifera autumnal foliage backgrounds
  • African tulip tree (Spathodea campanulata) flowering bright orange against the blue Atlantic sea
  • Close up Macro of a Chinese Tulip Tree Flower Against Black Background in Sepia with Film Grain.
  • The flower of an African Tulip Tree in a tropical rainforest near Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaii
  • African Tulip Tree or Flame Tree; Spathodea Campanulata; Big Island of Hawai’i; USA
  • A blossoming African tulip tree (Spathodea campanulata). Mexico. Tulipier du Gabon (Spathodea campanulata) en fleurs (Mexique).
  • Flowering African Tulip tree Spathodea campanulata
  • tulip tree
  • Amerikanischer Tulpenbaum, Tulpen-Baum, Magnolie, Liriodendron tulipifera, Canary Whitewood, Tulip Polar, Tulip Tree
  • Liriodendron tulipifera fastigiatum. Tulip tree in autumn at RHS Wisley Gardens, Surrey, England
  • African Tulip Tree (Spathodea campanula) in Hawaiian rainforest
  • tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), leaf
  • Tulip tree – leaves in autumn colours – colourful foliage (Liriodendron tulipifera)
  • Union Station with tulip tree, Portland, Oregon.
  • African tulip tree, Spathodea campanulata.
  • Bloom of the African Tulip Tree, a tropical plant on the Island of Maui, Hawaii
  • Yellow throated Vireo on Nest in Tulip Tree
  • Tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera)
  • Tulip Tree Liriodendron tulipifera in autumn
  • American tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) flower, Lilburn, Georgia, USA
  • Backlit young leaf of a tulip tree Liriodendron tulipifera shape like a tulip
  • Close Up View of a Blooming African Tulip Tree, Gurabo, Puerto Rico
  • Beautiful pink bloom of a flowering magnolia pink tulip tree. Colorful nature background of pink petals.
  • African Tulip Tree or Flame Tree; Spathodea Campanulata; Big Island of Hawai’i; USA
  • The strange trunk with alternate prptuberances of an old Virginia tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), at Lucca (Tuscany – Italy).
  • Flowering African Tulip tree Spathodea campanulata
  • Liriodendron tulipifera, tulip tree in autumn
  • Amerikanischer Tulpenbaum, Tulpen-Baum, Magnolie, Liriodendron tulipifera, Canary Whitewood, Tulip Polar, Tulip Tree
  • AFRICAN TULIP TREE FLOWERS AND PODS IN THE RAIN TOBAGO WEST INDIES
  • Blossom on a tulip tree, Lat. Liriodendron tulipifera, Spring
  • tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), leaf
  • Close-up of a growth, cancer on an American Tulip Tree, Yellow Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera)
  • Tulip tree bloom, Bushs Pasture Park, Salem, Oregon.
  • tulip tree, liriodendron tulipifera
  • Flower of the tulip tree, Liriodendron tulipifera
  • the circumference bench around the trunk of a Tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifora) invites for a rest and contemplation at the Blue Mountains Botanic
  • Orange flowers and seed pods of the African Tulip Tree
  • Tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) in the Park of Palace Festetics in Keszthely at Lake Balaton, Hungary
  • American tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) flower, Lilburn, Georgia, USA
  • Tulip Tree House in the Enchanted Woods of Winterthur Gardens, Delaware, USA
  • Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), showing autumn colour, Germany
  • Beautiful pink bloom of a flowering magnolia pink tulip tree. Colorful nature background of pink petals.
  • African Tulip Tree or Flame Tree; Spathodea Campanulata; Big Island of Hawai’i; USA
  • The strange bole with alternate bulges of an old Virginia tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), at Lucca (Tuscany – Italy).
  • Flowering African Tulip tree Spathodea campanulata
  • Autumn in the Cotswolds – A tulip tree at Stanway House, Gloucestershire UK
  • Amerikanischer Tulpenbaum, Tulpen-Baum, Magnolie, Liriodendron tulipifera, Canary Whitewood, Tulip Polar, Tulip Tree
  • Spathodea campanulata African tulip tree
  • Single leaf from a Tulip tree in autumn
  • tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), young leaf
  • Baker’s tulip, tree, flora, spring, spring flora, Greece, Europe, plateau, plateau, Crete, scenery, landscape, Levka Ori, Tulipa
  • Tulip tree bloom, Bushs Pasture Park, Salem, Oregon.
  • tulip tree, liriodendron tulipifera
  • Flowers and foliage of the hardy tulip tree, Liriodendron tulipifera
  • Leaf structure of the Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), detail, Germany
  • Yellow-flowered variety of the African Tulip Tree Kauai HI
  • Tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) in the Park of Palace Festetics in Keszthely at Lake Balaton, Hungary
  • American tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) flower, Lilburn, Georgia, USA
  • The flower of an African Tulip Tree (Spathodea campanulata P.Beauv.) on the island of St Helena in the south Atlantic Ocean
  • Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), showing autumn colour, Germany
  • AFRICAN TULIP TREE IN FLOWER AGAINST A BLUE SKY AND FINE WHITE CLOUDS
  • African Tulip Tree or Flame Tree; Spathodea Campanulata; Big Island of Hawai’i; USA
  • tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera)
  • A close up of the yellow and gold autumn foliage of the tulip tree Liriodendron tulipifera
  • botany, blossom of the tulip tree, Caution! For Greetingcard-Use / Postcard-Use In German Speaking Countries Certain Restrictions May Apply
  • Amerikanischer Tulpenbaum, Tulpen-Baum, Magnolie, Liriodendron tulipifera, Canary Whitewood, Tulip Polar, Tulip Tree
  • leaves of a tulip tree, Lat. Liriodendron tulipifera, atumn, indian summer, Pullach im Isartal, south of Munich, Upper Bavaria,
  • Frozen orange leaf of a tulip tree
  • tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), leaf in backlight
  • Baker’s tulip, tree, flora, spring, spring flora, Greece, Europe, plateau, plateau, Crete, scenery, landscape, Levka Ori, Tulipa
  • Tulip tree bloom, Bushs Pasture Park, Salem, Oregon.
  • tulip tree, liriodendron tulipifera
  • Yellow autumn foliage of the deciduous tulip tree, Liriodendron tulipifera
  • Leaf structure of the Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), detail, Germany
  • Yellow-flowered variety of the African Tulip Tree Kauai HI
  • African Tulip Tree (Spathodea campanulata), Mount Barnett Roadhouse, Kimberley Region, Western Australia
  • American tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) flower, Lilburn, Georgia, USA
  • Little girl in the park near the tulip tree
  • Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), showing autumn colour, Germany
  • Tulip tree

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How to Propagate a Tulip Poplar

Tulip poplars are graceful, stately trees that can grow to majestic heights of 150 feet. Bright orange-yellow flowers that resemble tulips bloom high on the tree, and the distinctive waxy leaves turn bright gold in autumn. To propagate a tulip poplar, take hardwood cuttings from a healthy tree in late fall or winter, when the tree will be in its dormant stage. Cuttings taken early in the day will be healthy and well-hydrated.

Clean pruning shears by wiping them with rubbing alcohol or a mixture of one part water combined with nine parts household bleach.

Use the pruning shears to cut a long, upright stem from the middle of the tulip poplar, or from a stem that is near the ground. Avoid stems that are higher on the tree. The cutting should be at least the diameter of a pencil, but no bigger than your little finger.

Divide the long stem into shorter pieces, each with a minimum of three to four leaf nodes. A leaf node is where a bud of leaf is about to emerge from the tree. In order to accomplish this, the pieces will be about 6 to 8 inches long.

Cut the lower end of each cutting at a 45-degree angle, and leave the upper end with a straight cut. It’s crucial that the cutting be planted with the lower end down, and this will remind you which end is which.

Fill 1-gallon planting containers with one part perlite and one part peat moss that has been dampened with a spray bottle. Dip each cutting in rooting hormone and plant them, one or two cuttings to a container, with about one-third to one-half of the lower stem under the soil level. Be sure there are at least one or two leaf nodes under the soil.

Spray the soil again, and cover the container with a piece of clear plastic. Put the cutting in a warm, light place but out of direct sunlight. Keep the soil consistently moist but never soggy.

Check after a month to see if the cuttings have developed roots. This can be determined by tugging lightly on a cutting, and if it offers resistance, it has likely rooted. You can also check for roots coming through the drainage hole in the bottom of the pot.

Plant the cuttings outdoors when the weather warms in the spring. By this time, the cuttings will have a healthy root system.

Tulip Tree Facts

The tulip tree is called so because its flowers resemble tulips. Here is a compilation of interesting facts about tulip trees for kids.

The only similarity between a tulip tree and a tulip is that the flowers look somewhat similar. But, the similarity ends here. Tulip trees are large trees belonging to the genus Liriodendron. They have distinct leaves and flowers. Although named as tulip tree, this tree has no relation to the tulip. Flowers of this tree appear very similar to tulip or magnolia. In fact, they appear more like magnolia flowers than tulips. This is because the tulip tree belongs to the family ‘Magnoliaceae’.

Facts About Tulip Trees

If you stay in the eastern part of the North America, you must be very familiar with the tulip tree or the tulip poplar. These trees are commonly found in gardens and parks. You can also plant it at home if you have a large space available.

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Here are some interesting facts about this beautiful tree.

  • The tulip tree is a deciduous broad leaf tree, which is a native to the continent of North America.
  • The tulip tree is commonly found in several parts of the United States like Michigan, Louisiana, Florida, Ohio and Indiana.
  • One of the most fascinating tulip tree facts is that this tree is the state tree of three states, viz. Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee.
  • The Latin name of this tree is Liriodendron tulipifera. It is commonly known as the tulip tree, poplar, saddle leaf tree, white/yellow poplar, etc.
  • The tulip tree is known as poplar because the leaves of this tree shimmer in the breeze just like those of the poplar.
  • Liriodendron chinense, and Liriodendron tulipifera are the two species of this tree.
  • As mentioned above, the tulip trees are large and grow to a great height. On an average, these trees grow up to 80-100 feet tall. The tallest tulip tree found on the Earth is about 200 feet tall.
  • The tulip tree is one of the tallest trees found in the eastern United States.
  • One of the characteristic features of this tree that helps in easy identification is that the tulip tree has a very straight bark. The bottom branches start from nearly 70-80 feet from the ground.
  • The leaves of the tulip tree have four points and appear like duck’s feet. The leaves of Liriodendron chinense are larger than those of Liriodendron tulipifera.
  • Early summer or May is the flowering season for this tree. Usually the flowers are green in color. But in case of yellow and pink tulip trees, yellow and pink flowers respectively, are observed.
  • The flowers appear at the top of the tree and hence, are very high above from the ground. Therefore, you will either need binoculars or you have to observe the fallen flowers of the tulip poplar tree.
  • The flowers blossom in between spring and early summer. On the other hand, during fall, the leaves of this tree turn bright yellow.
  • African tulip tree is very much different from other tulip trees. The African tulip tree belongs to the genus Spathodea, and is commonly known as Palash or flame of forest.
  • The flowers of the African tulip tree are bright red or yellow; and are not similar to actual tulips in any way.
  • Now, if you wish to plant these trees, note that they thrive in temperate as well as moist climates, in well-drained soil. When planted, the tulip tree grows very fast (2-3 feet every year), but does not blossom for a long time.
  • Lastly, another interesting fact is that the average life span of the tulip poplar tree is 200-250 years. However, it can also live as long as 300 years.

I hope you enjoyed reading these facts. So, if you are planning to grow this tree in your garden, you can check on the Internet for more tips on tulip tree cultivation. Ciao!

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