Well Dressing in Derbyshire 2017

Well dressing is one of the best known and most popular and colourful customs in Derbyhire and the Peak District. Well dressing dates back hundreds of years, and though there have been religious associations, the true origins remain unknown. Every year from May to September thousands of visitors from both the UK and abroad travel to the Derbyshire in order to see the well dressings displayed in over 80 Derbyhire and the Peak District villages and towns.

Each village taking part in this custom has its own jealously guarded version and designs worked out months beforehand are not revealed until the last possible moment.

Todays wells are decorated with flower petals, berries, moss, cones and seeds, which are pressed into clay held in a wooden framework. It is a difficult task combining hard work and artistic dexterity. The locally dug clay is cleansed of all impurities and is often mixed with salt and trod to the right consistency. The frames are then soaked to prevent the clay from drying out. The frames often have rows of protruding nails which help to prevent the damp clay from falling away when the frames are standing.

Some villages allow you to view the making of the Well Dressings and the Dressings often form part of a village or town festival which might continue for afew days or longer. The Wells are also usually blessed at about the same time as they go on display.


Derbyshire and Peak District Well Dressing dates for year 2017

Etwall Well Dressings 20 May 2017 – 22 May 2017
Tissington Well Dressings 25 May 2017 – 31 May 2017
Middleton by Youlgrave Well Dressing Saturday 27th May – Friday 2nd June
Brackenfield 27 May 2017 – 29 May 2017
Youlgrave Saturday 17th to 22nd?
Ashford-in-the-Water Well Dressing 10 June 2017 – 18 June 2017
Over Haddon Well Dressing 2017: 24th June -1st July
Coal Aston 1 July 2017 – 6 July 2017
Hayfield 1 July 2017 – 9 July 2017
Buxton Well Dressing 2 July 2017 – 10 July 2017
Whitwell 8 July 2017 – 15 July 2017
West Hallam 15 July 2017 – 16 July 2017
Belper 15 July 2017 – 21 July 2017
Heath 15 July 2017 – 22 July 2017
Chesterfield Well Dressing 9 Sept 2017 – 16 Sept 2017

Not complete (mar 2017). Dates liable to change. Please check again nearer the event or by checking at Tourist Information Centres They will also supply dates for the construction of these well dressings.

See also

Other Derbyshire and Peak District Attractions

Derbyshire and Peak District Accommodation

Peak District Guide

Other Derbyshire and Peak District Events

For photos of Well Dressing in Derbyshire please see Derbyshire Well Dressing Photographs.

For further informatiom please contact one of the tourist information centres which can be found at Tourist Information Centres


Well Dressing

The ancient custom known as Well Dressing is peculiar to England, and Derbyshire and Staffordshire in particular.

When did well dressing begin and why did it begin in Derbyshire?

Well dressing is actually a bit of a mystery. Perhaps we can look to the location of Derbyshire as a reason why the custom developed here and nowhere else. Derbyshire is a very beautiful but remote county, even nowadays with modern road infrastructure. The Derbyshire hills and dales make it difficult to pass easily from place to place. If the practice of well dressing dates back to the Celts, then perhaps the remoteness of the Derbyshire dales prevented the succeeding Roman, Saxon, Danish and Norman invaders from imposing their customs on the local people.

The early Christians were not happy with the custom of dressing wells – they considered it water worship and promptly put an end to it!

But the tradition refused to die. Tissington was the first village to re-introduce well dressing in 1349, after the village managed to escape a terrible outbreak of the Black Death that swept through England at this time. Many villages began to dress the new water taps when piped water first came to the villages.

What exactly is well dressing and how is it done?

Well dressing involves the decoration of springs and wells with pictures made from living plants and flowers, and usually happens in the summer and early autumn. Some villages allow visitors to watch the preparations – details at the end of this feature

So how is a well dressed?

First take a wooden board, perhaps 4 feet wide, and over an inch deep. Some dressings take several boards, of different shapes and sizes. The board(s) are taken to the local river or pond and soaked for several days to ensure that they are really wet. Then they are covered with a layer of soft, wet clay onto which the artist etches the design.

The outline is the first thing to be done, followed by the ‘colouring in’. The materials used vary from village to village and depend also on the time of year that the dressing takes place. For instance, a village that dresses it’s well in May may use blossoms and flowers whereas later in the year, seeds and berries are used as these are more plentiful.

Town End Well, Bradwell, August 2009

How long does it take?

A well dressing can take up to 7 days, involving a team of local people. Unfortunately, it may then only last a week or so until the clay dries out and the flowers die. Then all is put away until next year.

Where can I see Well Dressing?

Well dressing starts in May – Tissington and Endon are two villages who dress their wells early in the year.

Small Dale, Bradwell, August 2009

The Art of Well Dressing

Every year throughout summer many villages in Derbyshire and Staffordshire decorate their wells and water sources—a custom known as well dressing. Villagers take large wooden boards, coat them in clay and press flower petals, twigs, seeds and other natural objects to create scenes from the Bible or fairy tales. These boards are then used to adorn local wells and springs.

While the true origins of well dressing have been lost in time, it likely began as a pagan custom of offering thanks to gods for a reliable water supply. In mediaeval England, lack of hygiene lead to frequent outbreaks of diseases like plague and cholera which claimed dozens of lives in every village whenever the epidemic struck. During the Black Death of 1348-1349, when approximately one third of the population of England died, some Derbyshire villages escaped untouched. One theory is that the local people who had been spared felt their water supply was the cause of their good fortune, and began decorating their village wells as an act of gratitude. Another theory is that during a prolonged drought in 1615, a village well was the only source of water, and thus began the tradition.

Photo credit: Simon Harrod/Flickr (left), SteveR/Flickr (right)

Initially, the Christians were not happy with this kind of pagan worship and sought to end it. Gradually, however, the ancient springs and wells lost their pagan associations and were rededicated to one or another of the Christian Saints. Once again people began to decorate their wells with flowers as an act of thanksgiving to God for the gift of water.

Quite a number of town and villages in Derbyshire and Staffordshire have a long standing tradition of well dressing going back to the late 19th or early 20th centuries. One village that has kept the tradition alive since medieval times is Tissington in Derbyshire. The last few decades of the 20th century saw a great revival of the craft with more than a hundred villages in Derbyshire taking up the tradition.

Photo credit: Phil Richards/Flickr

Photo credit: Smudge 9000/Flickr

Photo credit: JR P/Flickr

Photo credit: steve p2008/Flickr

Photo credit: Steve Cottrell/Flickr

Photo credit: Steve Cottrell/Flickr

Photo credit: Smudge 9000/Flickr

Photo credit: Smudge 9000/Flickr

Photo credit: Smudge 9000/Flickr

Photo credit: JR P/Flickr

Sources: www.timetravel-britain.com / welldressing.com

Stay in Touch!

This Tissington well-dressing design, from 2013, marries a biblical theme with slightly more contemporary war imagery. Martin Dawes/CC BY-SA 2.0

In May of 2012, as they do every spring, thousands of people flocked to the village of Tissington, to ooh and aah what is widely considered to be the best set of well-dressings that Central England has to offer. The craft, which is unique to the Derbyshire region, sees artists spending days pressing flower petals, leaves, and other natural materials onto boards that have been caked with clay, forming intricate illustrations that are then propped up on top of the village’s water sources. The creations only last about a week before they fall apart.

That year, tourists walked between Hands Well—an illustration of the Old Testament verse in which the prophet Samuel anoints King Saul with a flask of olive oil—and Yew Tree Well, which showed Jesus, clothed in purple robes, cradling a lamb. Then they headed over to Town Well, where some of them were in for a surprise. Instead of a Biblical figure, Town Well’s artwork centered on the Gruffalo, the fuzzy, toothy star of the popular children’s book of the same name. Where other well-dressings were captioned with “The Lord’s My Shepherd” or “Samuel Anoints Saul,” the legend arcing over this one read “Oh help! Oh no! It’s a Gruffalo!”

“There was some controversy” over this particular well-dressing, says Rosemary Shirley, a senior lecturer in art theory and practice at Manchester Metropolitan University. “It was done by a young designer, and there was a certain amount of hemming and hawing. But it was also this amazing moment—a bit of a break with the past.”

The groundbreaking Gruffalo design, from 2012. Copyright Glyn Williams

Shirley has been fascinated by well-dressing for most of her life, ever since she first encountered it on a primary school trip, where it struck her as surreal and somewhat outside of time. “It always felt as if it was something strange that I had imagined—like, ‘What was that? Did I make it up?’” she says. As this initial fascination has grown into a more scholarly interest, she has watched the art form change in turn, its traditional themes making room for more modern concerns, even as much of the methodology stays the same.

No one is quite sure when well-dressing began. As Shirley writes in a recent article, the first recorded mention of it comes from 1818, when a scenery enthusiast named Ebeneezer Rhodes wrote of “an ancient custom” in Tissington involving “boards… covered in moist clay into which the stems of flowers are inserted… to form a beautiful mosaic work, often tasteful in design, and vivid in colouring.” The village itself cites two possible years of origin: 1348, when an outbreak of plague skipped the village due to their pristine water supply, and 1615, when that same water supply saved everyone from a drought.

Tissington’s Hall Well, from 2017, shows Moses dividing the waters. Copyright Glyn Williams

Over the intervening centuries, the custom has spread to villages across Derbyshire. According to welldressing.com, which features an exhaustive calendar, there’s a display going on at one village or another from early May straight through until the end of August. But most people agree that Tissington still sets the gold standard. “They’ve always been very elaborate, and very detailed,” says Shirley.

To uphold this reputation, designers in Tissington plan their well-dressings all year. “If someone buys a bunch of flowers, she’s thinking ‘Ooh, could I dry these? What color would they turn?’” Shirley says.

The process begins in earnest in late April or early May, a week before Ascension Day, when the artworks first go on display. The artists start by floating large, variously shaped timber boards in the village pond until the wood swells with water. They then dig up clay from a seam under a nearby field, stomp on it until it’s pliable, and then spread it over each board “until it resembles a wax tablet,” writes Shirley.

Then comes three days of pedal-to-the-metal, petal-to-the-board decorating. Teams of villagers crowd around the boards, “painting” their designated picture with materials they’ve gathered and prepared over the course of the year. First come either coffee beans or alder cones, to form solid black outlines that correspond to a drawing the designer has made.

A detail of a 2016 Tissington well-dressing, which used fishtank pebbles to fill in a white background. Copyright Rosemary Shirley

These are then filled in by flower petals, leaves, catkins, and other bits from nature, all chosen for their color and texture. (Over the years, Shirley writes, some more traditional elements have been swapped out for less natural ones: where well-dressers once made clouds out of a shiny white local stone called fluorspar, it has become expensive and hard to find, and they now often substitute white fishtank gravel from China.) The petals are overlapped like roof tiles, so that if rainstorms come, the water slides right off.

Throughout, the decorators share news and gossip, breaking occasionally for homemade tea and cakes. “It’s a really addictive process,” says Shirley, who helped build a well-dressing in 2016, as part of her research. “It’s slighty meditative—there’s a rhythm to it. And when you’ve finished, it’s very satisfying.” Perhaps because of this, Tissington’s well-dressers tend to take up the task again and again, passing on knowledge and techniques to their children and other newcomers. “The format they use has not changed for about 200 years,” says Shirley.

Their subject matter, however, is slowly shifting. “Traditionally in Tissington, there’s a Biblical centerpiece,” says Shirley, but over the past couple of decades, the designs have begun branching out. In the year 2000, every well in Tissington was dressed religiously: wishing Jesus a happy second millennium, or celebrating St. Francis’s “Circle of Days.” Fast forward 12 years, and you’ve got details themed around the Olympics and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, not to mention that full-sized ode to the Gruffalo.

“Adam Names the Animals,” from 2016, features various Beatrix Potter characters alongside the biblical tale. Copyright Rosemary Shirley

Often, designers will meet in the middle, as with one beloved 2016 specimen that combined Adam’s Naming of the Animals with illustrations of Peter Rabbit and Jemima Puddle-Duck, to honor the 150th anniversary of Beatrice Potter’s birth. (This year, there were dressings themed around zoo animals, World War I, and another popular children’s book, A Squash and a Squeeze.)

Though they may stray from strict tradition, most of these more modern themes don’t lose sight of a broader goal: to “project the idea of an English village,” says Shirley. Military history, royalty, and even children’s book monsters sit within this framework of, “safe and cozy things or themes that reflect a traditional or nostalgic idea of British identity—things that people want to see when they’re engaging in a day out in the countryside.”*​ This bounded flexibility is helping the art form thrive: about 35,000 tourists visited Tissington this past well-dressing season. “There’s more well-dressing in 2017 than there was in 1950,” says Shirley.

At least a little of that burgeoning interest might be attributed to the Gruffalo. “It turned out to be the most popular ,” says Shirley. “It has gone down in well-dressing myth.”

*Update 9/7: This story has been updated since it was first published. A quote from Rosemary Shirley has been expanded to clarify the relationship between well-dressing themes and British tradition.

We are now approaching a fascinating tradition of well dressing. This is an annual event which takes places predominantly in villages throughout Derbyshire, but it is now also spreading to other parts of the country.

There are various ideas as to its origin varying from offering thanks to gods for a reliable water supply, to celebrating the purity of water to celebrating the waters constancy during a prolonged drought. It seems unlikely that the true origin will ever been established, but whatever its origin it is still very much alive and well today.

The village of Tissington, Derbyshire and its well-dressing or well-flowering as it was previously known, was one of the first that we came across in the Georgina era. This article in the Derby Mercury of 26 November 1823 sheds a little more light on the event.

Courtesy of calendarcustoms.com

Tissington ‘Well flowering’, Tissington, Nov 15th, 1823

TO THE EDITOR OF THE DERBY MERCURY

Sir, – Having a few days ago read in the Derby Mercury, some account relative to the above; I am induced with all deference to Mr. Rhodes, as the author, to submit to your notice a few particulars, therein omitted, which, tho’ trifling in themselves, will not, it is presumed, prove altogether uninteresting they form part of a letter, written by a youth at school, to his parents: –

During my residence in this village, I have been gratified by one of the most pleasing sights I ever beheld. I should much wish you to be present upon a similar occasion. I will, however, in the meantime, endeavour to give you something like a description of the festival to which I have alluded.

Holy Thursday, the time referred to, is observed here with an almost enthusiastic respect, amounting, in some instances, to a degree of veneration.

Tideswell Well Dressing

Perhaps, no part of the world is more peculiarly favoured by providence in the gift of good water than this village; and the above-mentioned day appears to have been fixed upon, by an almost immemorial custom, to make merry and return united thanks for the same, in the following impressive manner.

While the younger branches of the community are busily engaged in gathering flowers, moss etc. during the first part of the week, some few, of rather mature years, occupy themselves in preparing the Springs, or, as they are here called ‘Wells’, tho’ not exceeding in depth a foot and a half, to receive their annual decorations.

Arches, or other fancy shapes, are accordingly formed out of a strong plank, upon which, fine clay, worked to the consistence of stiff mortar, is spread, and the embroidering part, if I may be allowed the expression, commences.

A Well Dressing in the making (Hollinsclough, 2006). Courtesy of Welldressing.com

Various tasteful devices are now sketched on the clay, upon which, short ellipt flowers, of diverse sorts and colours, among which, the blood daisy, from its rich velvet hue, is held in greatest esteem, are stuck thereon, so extremely close and regular that not the least atom of the ground-work can be seen; each Spring also a flower printed Motto, in allusion to the ascension of our Saviour. For instance

‘I ascend unto my Father and your Father, and to my God and your God’

St John, chapter 20, verse 17.

On the principal Well, May 16th 1822:

The joyous day at length arrives, ushered in by the ringing of bells, and smiling faces; the decorations are speedily erected over the wells, while garlands, bough etc. disposed in the most fantastic and fairy-like manner, embellish the whole.

And now, labourer, stand thou still ‘tis a holyday for all; the poorest peasant has contrived, out of his hard earnings, to brew a ‘peck of malt’ to treat the passing guest; all doors are thrown open, and all comers experience the English Farmer’s hearty welcome.

‘Around the glossy board in sparkling pride,

The oft fill’d Tankard reels’.

One particular which tho’ last not least, is, that an appropriate sermon is preached; after which the music and signers go around, accompanied by hundreds of visitors from many miles and sing a psalm at each Spring.

With regard to the origin of the above, I have not been able to gather any certain information; prevailing opinion however, dates its rise from the Druids; be that as it may, the custom, as practised at Tissington, far exceeds in beauty and chastity of style everything that is generally conceived of Village rusticity.

Holymoorside well dressing celebrating Jane Austen, and with Chatsworth House in the background. Via Chatsworth House twitter @ChatsworthHouse.

For those interested in visiting a well dressing this year, this link will take you to this year’s calendar.

Featured Image

Courtesy of Creative Commons

Well Dressing Stock Photos and Images

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  • Well Dressing (Van Gogh theme), ‘Coffin Well’, Tissington, Derbyshire
  • The Art of Well Dressing
  • Well dressings Tissington ‘Hands Well’ Noah theme Tissington, Derbyshire Peak District Derbyshire, England GB UK EU Europe
  • Tissington well dressing, Peak District National Park, Derbyshire, England, UK.
  • Tissington, Derbyshire, UK. May 31, 2017. The Hands well dressing depicting Christ’s first miracle of changing water into Wine at Tissington in Derby
  • Looking at well dressing in Eyam, Derbyshire, UK
  • Well Dressing at Elmton, Derbyshire
  • Well dressing in Cressbrook,Derbyshire,England, depicting Bleriot’s first flight across the English Channel in 1909
  • Taddington Well Dressing, Derbyshire August 2012
  • Well dressing in the Peak District, detail of 2018 Bamford well dressing
  • Well dressing, Etwall, Derbyshire, England
  • Well dressing at Jenkin Chapel, Derbyshire, England, an ancient traditional English custom
  • Malvern Well dressing and poetry competition, the Enigma Fountain plus Malvhina water feature in Malvern
  • A picture made from wool and other natural materials as part of a traditional well dressing in Hayfield, Derbyshire.
  • Market Place, Crich, Derbyshire, U.K. 18th July 2015. The first ever well dressing in the Derbyshire village of Crich. Well dressing is a popular tradition in Derbyshire, but this is the first year Crich has participated in well dressing. The origin of well dressing is said to lie in pagan tradition or in giving thanks for the purity of the water drawn from wells during the time of the Black Death. It is believed to have originated in the Derbyshire village of Tissington in 1349. Credit: Mark Richardson/Alamy Live News
  • Barlow Well Dressing, Barlow, Derbyshire 2016
  • Well dressing in Bonsall in the Peak District Derbyshire
  • Traditional Deryshire well dressing in Eyam, 2014
  • Well Dressing, Litton, Derbyshire. Shakespeare theme.
  • Tissington Well Dressing, Tissington, Derbyshire, England, UK
  • Derbyshire Well Dressing celebrating 800 years of the Magna Carta at Wirksworth
  • Well dressings at Tissington 2010, Hands Well Tissington, Derbyshire Peak District, Derbyshire, England, GB, UK, EU, Europe
  • Buxton , Derbyshire, UK. 14th July 2018. An expectant crowd awaits the declaration of the winner in the Duck Race on a rather sluggish River Wye during the town’s annual Well Dressing Festival
  • Well dressing at Over Haddon Derbyshire England UK 2011
  • Well dressing is an annual Whitsuntide tradition dating back hundreds of years and closely associated with Tissington and the Derbyshire Peak District
  • Businessman dressing in front of mirror
  • Well dressing, Wormhill,Derbyshire
  • Ashford-in-the-Water well dressing 2018 Peak District Derbyshire Uk
  • UK, England, Derbyshire, Eyam, volunteers constructing the Requisitioning of Horses 2014 well dressing
  • Well dressing, Etwall, Derbyshire, England
  • A business woman preparing for work, dressing and putting on jewellery.
  • Well-dressing at Great Hucklow, Derbyshire
  • A picture made from flower petals and other natural materials as part of a traditional well dressing in Hayfield, Derbyshire.
  • Market Place, Crich, Derbyshire, U.K. 18th July 2015. The first ever well dressing in the Derbyshire village of Crich. Well dressing is a popular tradition in Derbyshire, but this is the first year Crich has participated in well dressing. The origin of well dressing is said to lie in pagan tradition or in giving thanks for the purity of the water drawn from wells during the time of the Black Death. It is believed to have originated in the Derbyshire village of Tissington in 1349. Credit: Mark Richardson/Alamy Live News
  • A Derbyshire well dressing sign advertising Hartington Wakes
  • 2010 Well dressing in Bonsall in the Peak District Derbyshire
  • Traditional Deryshire well dressing in Eyam, 2014
  • Well Dressing, Litton, Derbyshire. Shakespeare theme.
  • St Anne’s Well dressing, Buxton, Derbyshire, UK
  • Bakewell Churchyard during the Blessing of the Well Dressing Ceremony
  • Tissington Derbyshire Tissington Well dressings Tissington Derbyshire Peak District Derbyshire, England GB UK EU Europe
  • Tissington well dressing, Peak District National Park, Derbyshire, England, UK.
  • Well Dressing at Ashford-in-the-Water Derbyshire England UK 2011
  • Well dressing is an annual Whitsuntide tradition dating back hundreds of years and closely associated with Tissington and the Derbyshire Peak District
  • Businessman dressing in front of mirror
  • Well dressing, Wormhill,Derbyshire, celebrating the gift of water, saying ‘Blessed are the pure of heart for they shall see God’
  • Well dressing in Swanwick – the art of decorating springs and wells with pictures made from natural materials, mainly flowers is an ancient custom fou
  • UK, England, Derbyshire, Eyam, volunteer constructing the Requisitioning of Horses 2014 well dressing
  • Morris dancers at Etwall Well Dressing, Derbyshire, England
  • The annual Well Dressing at the River Gardens, Belper, Derbyshire
  • Well-dressing at Great Hucklow, Derbyshire
  • A picture made from flower petals and other natural materials as part of a traditional well dressing in Hayfield, Derbyshire
  • Market Place, Crich, Derbyshire, U.K. 18th July 2015. The first ever well dressing in the Derbyshire village of Crich. Well dressing is a popular tradition in Derbyshire, but this is the first year Crich has participated in well dressing. The origin of well dressing is said to lie in pagan tradition or in giving thanks for the purity of the water drawn from wells during the time of the Black Death. It is believed to have originated in the Derbyshire village of Tissington in 1349. Credit: Mark Richardson/Alamy Live News
  • Tissington Well-Dressing in 1845, the Ceremony at the Hall Well
  • 2010 Well dressing in Bonsall in the Peak District Derbyshire
  • Traditional Deryshire well dressing in Eyam, 2014
  • Well Dressing, Litton, Derbyshire. Shakespeare theme. A tradition in which pictures are made from petal stuck to clay
  • Coffin Well, Tissington Well Dressing, Derbyshire, England, UK
  • Derbyshire Well Dressing 2012 at Ashford-in-the-Water near Bakewell
  • Tideswell, Well Dressing, Derbyshire, Peak District, England, UK
  • Tissington well dressing, Peak District National Park, Derbyshire, England, UK.
  • Well Dressing at Ashford-in-the-Water Derbyshire England UK 2011
  • Well dressing is an annual Whitsuntide tradition dating back hundreds of years and closely associated with Tissington and the Derbyshire Peak District
  • Businessman dressing in front of mirror
  • A vicar blessing the Spring Gardens well dressing in Buxton, Derbyshire
  • Well dressing in Swanwick – the art of decorating springs and wells with pictures made from natural materials, mainly flowers is an ancient custom fou
  • UK, England, Derbyshire, Eyam, volunteer constructing the Requisitioning of Horses 2014 well dressing
  • Well Dressing, Tissington, (detail of Hands Well 2010), Peak District National Park, Derbyshire, England.
  • The annual Well Dressing at the River Gardens, Belper, Derbyshire
  • UK, England, Derbyshire, Ashford in the Water, Fennel St, well dressing, religious picture made of flower petals
  • A picture made from flower petals and other natural materials as part of a traditional well dressing in Hayfield, Derbyshire.
  • Tissington Well Dressing.
  • Well Dressing in Youlgreave Peak District Derbyshire England UK a local tradition where villages decorate wells to give thanks
  • 2010 Well dressing in Bonsall in the Peak District Derbyshire
  • Traditional Deryshire well dressing in Eyam, 2014
  • Well Dressing, Litton, Derbyshire. Shakespeare theme. A tradition in which pictures are made from petal stuck to clay
  • Tissington Well Dressing, Blessing Ceremony, Tissington, Derbyshire, England, UK
  • Derbyshire Well Dressing 2012 at Ashford-in-the-Water near Bakewell
  • Well dressings at Tissington
  • Tissington well dressing, Peak District National Park, Derbyshire, England, UK.
  • Detail of well dressing showing decorative petals depicting dry stone walling, walkers, rural scene, Peak District, Derbyshire
  • Well dressing is an annual Whitsuntide tradition dating back hundreds of years and closely associated with Tissington and the Derbyshire Peak District
  • Bisley well dressing ceremony. Floral decorations on 7 wells in bisley celebrating Ascension Day. Bisley, Cotswolds, Gloucestershire, England
  • A vicar blessing the Spring Gardens well dressing in Buxton, Derbyshire
  • Well dressing in Swanwick – the art of decorating springs and wells with pictures made from natural materials, mainly flowers is an ancient custom fou
  • UK, England, Derbyshire, Eyam, volunteer constructing the Requisitioning of Horses 2014 well dressing
  • Well Dressing, Tissington, (detail of Hands Well 2010), Peak District National Park, Derbyshire, England.
  • The annual Well Dressing at the River Gardens, Belper, Derbyshire
  • UK, England, Derbyshire, Ashford in the Water, Fennel St, vistor looking at well dressing picture made of petals
  • A picture made from flower petals and other natural materials as part of a traditional well dressing in Hayfield, Derbyshire.
  • A well dressing marks the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta, Ashford in the Water, Peak District Derbyshire UK
  • Little Longstone well dressing 2014
  • 2010 Well dressing in Bonsall in the Peak District Derbyshire
  • Traditional Deryshire well dressing in Eyam, 2014
  • Well Dressing at Wormhill, Derbyshire, in the Peak District
  • Tissington Well Dressing, Blessing Ceremony, Tissington, Derbyshire, England, UK
  • Derbyshire Well Dressing 2012 at Ashford-in-the-Water near Bakewell
  • Tissington Well dressings Tissington Derbyshire Peak District Derbyshire, England GB UK Europe
  • Well dressing festival, Taddington, Derbyshire. Plaque made from petals, wood bark and twigs.
  • Details of well dressing picture made from natural materials in the Peak District, Derbyshire, UK

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