Types Of Petunia Plants – What Are The Different Petunia Flowers

There’s a lot to appreciate about petunias, cheerful annuals that bloom dependably from early summer until the first frost in autumn. These cheery garden favorites are available in an amazing range of colors, sizes and forms. Read on to learn about a few of the different types of petunias.

Types of Petunia Plants

There are four main types of petunia plants: Grandiflora, Multiflora, Milliflora and Spreading (Wave). All four are readily available in series, which are groups of plants with uniform size and flowering habit. The only varying characteristic is the range of colors of different petunia flowers within each series.

Varieties of Petunias

The oldest types are Grandiflora petunias, which were developed in the 1950s. Grandiflora petunia varieties boast blooms measuring up to 5 inches across on bouquet-shaped plants. Although the flowers are spectacular, they tend to get tired and spindly in midsummer. Grandiflora petunias perform best in moderate summers without excess humidity or moisture.

Grandiflora petunias series include:

  • Ultra
  • Dream
  • Storm
  • Daddy
  • Supermagic
  • Supercascade

Multiflora petunias are smaller plants with more numerous but smaller blooms. The stems are strong, which makes multiflora petunia varieties suitable for windy climates. The blooms tend to hold up a bit longer than Grandiflora petunia varieties, especially during rainy weather. Multiflora petunias are available in both single and double varieties.

Popular Multiflora petunias include:

  • Primetime
  • Celebrity
  • Carpet
  • Horizon
  • Mirage
  • Primetime

Milliflora petunia varieties produce masses of 1- to 1 ½-inch blooms on miniature plants. Mature size of the plants is generally about 8 inches tall and wide. Milliflora petunias bloom early and are often grown in containers or hanging baskets. They are low-maintenance plants that require no deadheading.

Milliflora petunias include Picobella and Fantasy.

Spreading, or Wave petunias, are a recent addition with blooms typically measuring about 2 inches across. The plants, which typically spread 2 to 4 feet by the end of the season, look great in containers and work well as ground covers. They tolerate heat and drought fairly well and generally require no deadheading.

Wave petunias include:

  • Easy Wave
  • Shock Wave
  • Avalanche

Petunia

Petunias are one of our most popular summer bedding plants, flowering throughout summer until the first severe frosts of autumn. Their mass of flowers bring lots of great colour to gardens.

The compact, bushy varieties are perfect for planting in beds and borders and the trailing types brighten up hanging baskets and for flowing down the edges of containers.

There is great variety in petunia flowers: a wide range of colours; both single and double blooms; smooth or ruffled petals; solid single, striped, veined or picotee-edged colours; and even fragrance. Recent breeding has also removed the scourge of old petunia varieties – turning to mush in a wet summer.

Petunias are perennial, although most bedding types are grown as annuals from seed each year. The trailing varieties, such as Surfinias, are perennial and are grown from cuttings or new plants.

How to grow petunias

Cultivation

Petunias prefer to be grown in full sun, although during hot, sunny summers they will tolerate light shade. They grow best in a fertile, moist but well-drained soil. Dig in plenty of organic matter – such as garden compost, well-rotted manure or other soil improver – especially in very well-drained sandy soils to hold moisture.

Petunia varieties

Bedding varieties are either grandifloras with larger flowers or multifloras with smaller flowers that hold up better in the rain.

Spreading or trailing petunias include Surfinia, Wave, Tumbelina, Supertunia and Cascadia series.

Sowing petunias

The annual or bedding petunias can be grown from seed sown indoors with warmth in spring in cell trays, seed trays or small pots at a temperature of 18-24°C (65-75°F).

When large enough to handle, prick out plants individually into cell trays or small pots and grow on at a temperature of 50-65°F (10-15°C) in good light.

Gradually acclimatise the plants to outdoor conditions for 7 to 10 days before planting outdoors when all risk of frost has passed.

If you don’t have the facilities to grow them from seed, young petunia seedlings are available from garden centres and mail order suppliers in late winter/early spring.

Planting petunias

Petunias are planted out in May/June after the danger of frost has passed.

Dig a good sized planting hole, big enough to easily accommodate the rootball. Add a layer of organic matter – such as compost or planting compost – to the base of the hole and fork it in.

Place the rootball in the planting hole and adjust the planting depth so that it is planted at the same depth as it was originally growing (except hardy fuchsias) and the top of the roots are level with the soil surface. Mix in more organic matter with the excavated soil and fill in the planting hole. Apply a granular general feed over the soil and water in well. Applying a 5-7.5cm (2-3in) deep mulch of well-rotted garden compost or similar over the soil will help maintain soil moisture and keep down weeds.If you have a warm greenhouse, you can plant up containers and baskets in spring and grow on the plants, ready to place outside in late May/early June. This way you’ll have flowers earlier in the summer.

Suggested planting locations and garden types

Flower borders and beds, patios, containers, city and courtyard gardens, cottage and informal gardens.

How to care for petunias

Keep the soil moist by watering regularly during prolonged dry periods in summer. Plants in containers will need regular, possibly daily watering – the aim being to keep the compost evenly moist. But don’t overwater, as too much water will cause the plants to become leggy with few flowers.

Feed regularly throughout summer with a liquid plant food to ensure a continuous supply of flowers. A high potash liquid plant food will encourage more, better blooms over a long flowering period until the first autumn frosts.

Removing faded flowers and any developing seed pods will prolong the display. Straggly plants can be cut back quite hard and then fed with a liquid plant food to produce fresh new growth and a profusion of flowers.

In the autumn, once damaged by frosts, bedding petunias are best dug up and composted.

Overwintering petunias

Perennial, trailing varieties can be cut back hard in autumn, tidied up to remove dead or damaged growth and carefully lifted. Pot them up in pots just big enough to take the rootball and some fresh potting compost around the sides, and overwinter in a light, frost-free place – preferably a greenhouse or cool conservatory.

Propagating perennial petunias

Perennial, trailing varieties can be propagated from cuttings taken in March/April from overwintered plants or in August/early September.

Choose strong, healthy young stems that aren’t flowering. If you can’t find suitable growth, cut back hard one or two stems at the back of the plants to encourage strong regrowth. Take cuttings 7.5-10cm (3-4in) long, cutting just below a leaf joint, or node. Remove the leaves from the lower two-thirds of the stem and insert five or six cuttings in pots of gritty, cuttings compost to the base of the lowest leaves. Place the pots in a plastic bag or in a propagator and place somewhere in good light, but out of direct sunlight, to root.

The cuttings should have rooted in 2 to 3 weeks, when they can be potted up individually and grown on.

Flowering season(s)

Summer, Autumn

Foliage season(s)

Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter

Sunlight

Full sun

Soil type

Clay, Loamy, Sandy

Soil pH

Neutral

Soil moisture

Moist but well-drained

Ultimate height

Up to 30cm (12in) depending on variety

Ultimate spread

Up to 1.5m (5ft) depending on variety

Time to ultimate height

4-6 months

Perennial Petunia ?

March has only just begun. Nothing has started blooming outdoors. We’re still getting snow in Connecticut. So, summer flowers of any kind are a joy to see.

I always thought petunias were annuals. They start from seeds in spring, grow, bloom, set seed, then die. The next spring, they begin again as seeds. A year ago, I planted seeds indoors for wave petunias. Throughout the summer, they didn’t do much and were pretty disappointing. I had them in baskets, hanging from the trellis/arbor in the vegetable garden. Towards the end of summer, I found tiny seedlings growing in the basket. Warm weather stayed with us into December, which was pretty unusual.

Since the seeds I had started in March took so long to start doing anything, I brought the whole basket inside for the winter. I figured I had nothing to lose. If they died, they died. If I could keep them alive, maybe they’d have a head start in spring and actually amount to something. The babies are not much more than babies, still. I’ve been experimenting with pinching to produce fullness. They’re not full yet, at all, and the main stem is only several inches long.

Here’s the odd part. The main plant still had green stems when I brought it in. Not wanting to kill it outright, I just pinched off all the dying stems. It has continued to grow. Keep in mind here that it had already set seed and reproduced. I’ve had the basket hanging on my seed starting shelf with grow lights. As the stems have grown too tall, I just pinched them off, rather carelessly since I thought I expected it to just die anyway. It’s kept growing and branching out. The shape isn’t wonderful. It has long stems that become full near the ends, kinda funny looking. Now, it’s flowering.

As a new gardener, it’s difficult to pinch and prune babies. I’ve been getting quite an education with this plant. So much so that I have newly sown petunia seeds just sprouting. I plan to do more pinching when they are still fairly short. Hopefully, I’ll learn how to encourage the nicely shaped bushy plants. The other thing that will be different this time around is their feeding. Last year, I used potting soil from the store or a home-made blend with finished compost from the outdoor pile. This year, I have finished vermicompost. I’ve used it in creating my seed starting mix and watering. This year’s seedlings already look much happier, and the season has barely gotten started.

Perennial Petunias Collection

Perennial Petunias are quick to grow and establish and will be covered in flowers for months.

Perennial Petunias have the advantage of lasting a few years in the garden as opposed to their annual counterparts. They have excellent cold tolerance, are renowned for being tough with weatherproof blooms.

Perennial Petunias add a bright pop of colour to gardens, pots or hanging baskets. They have a nice, dense, upright mounding form. The flowers can bloom from spring to autumn, longer in warmer climates.

Plant your Perennial Petunia into moderately fertile to humus rich, well drained soil. Add a diluted liquid fertiliser fortnightly, or some slow release pellets every couple of months to keep them blooming at their best. A light prune will also help prolong flowering. In pots and hanging baskets use a good quality potting mix.

Perennial Petunia Collection, receive one of each variety separately labelled. Includes Hotlips, Night Sky and Rim Magenta.

Perennial Petunia Collection Valued at $40.50, SAVE $2.00.

Petunias

September 23, 2017

I have Supertunias in concrete pots with a drip line. They get watered every day for about 10 minutes. They are in full sun all day. They have become very leggy and thin with very few leaves. What am I doing wrong? Also had Wave Petunias in another concrete pot that were stunning and almost overnight they turned brown and died. There got heavy afternoon sun and the sprinkler watered them daily. Again, what am I doing wrong?

Petunias can remain beautiful all season if they are fertilized regularly, and I mean every week or two during the growing season. This year, we had a lot of rain, so there are several annuals that got leggier than normal and maybe not as floriferous. For the supertunias that are still living, give them a haircut—cut them back by half and begin fertilizing. They are quite cool tolerant and will even tolerate some light freezes. For the quick dying pot, I would suspect maybe too much water and they died from a root rot. Clean out the container and sterilize, make sure it has a good drainage hole and plant with something for fall and winter color.

February 1, 2017

I have a very small Mexican Petunia. When and where should I plant it? Is it invasive?

I am surprised you have a Mexican petunia or Ruellia growing indoors. They are a perennial plant that typically go dormant for the winter and then re-grow the following season. They are very heat and drought tolerant. The standard Mexican – Ruellia brittoniana can grow to be 3- 4 feet in height and if given ample moisture, it can be aggressive. In drier sites, it is better behaved. The dwarf varieties that grow only 8-10 inches tall rarely get aggressive. They both do best in full sun. They do need some moisture to get established, but well-established plants are drought tolerant.

May 28, 2016

I have petunias planted in a container on the front porch that gets afternoon sun. They have already become leggy and the top where I pour water looks smashed down. There are still a few blooms. I deadhead them. Do I need to “cut them back” someway? Will they become “bushy” again with lots of flowers? Or, do I just need to consider their time spent and get new ones to plant?

Most of the newer varieties of petunias should bloom all summer without the benefit of deadheading, but they are heavy feeders. Since yours are already leggy, I would do two things. I would cut back the existing plants and add another new one in the pot with these. Then fertilize weekly and keep them watered and they should stay full and bushy and bloom all summer.

April 30, 2016

I purchased petunias last year at three different locations and failed to keep the tags. I was planning to replace the dead plants with pansies late in the fall as usual but about half of my petunias were still going strong after freezing temperatures hit. I even had blooms on Christmas Day! This spring they have grown larger and are covered in blooms. Is there such a thing as a perennial petunia? I sure would like to have more of the same this summer.

In a mild winter it is not unusual for petunias and callibrachoa (their smaller blooming cousin) to overwinter. We had an almost non-existent winter, and many have made a comeback. You obviously did a great job fertilizing your petunias throughout the growing season, since they will often stop blooming if they don’t get enough nutrition. In Little Rock, we did not have a hard, killing frost until after the New Year. I still had blooms on my dragonwing begonias, petunias and even tropical hibiscus until January 7. It was an unusual season, but not one we can be guaranteed every year.

(March 2010)

I have a neighbor that needs some help with her nine window boxes. Her window boxes are 36″ long, 7 1/2 ” wide and 6 ” deep, and they have a nice layer of moss all around, and no plastic liner. There are 4 on the first floor and 5 on the second. They get some morning sun, the 4 on the right more – maybe 4 hours, and the 5 on the left maybe 2-3 hours. Watering is not a problem, but her house is a dark red. Light pinks, yellows, white and any shade of green, especially the silver ones would look good. She would like a cascading effect on the top 5 as they are so high up. Would perennials work? That way she wouldn’t have to replant every year. Any suggestions you have would be wonderful.

There are two reasons I would probably opt for more annuals than perennials. First, I wonder how long perennials would last in these window boxes. The soil temperature will get much colder in these moss lined wire containers than in the ground, the containers aren’t that large, so the volume of soil is smaller, and they will be elevated, so my guess is that most perennials would freeze or at least go totally dormant during the winter. Another downside for flower potential, is that perennials have a defined season of bloom and then they have a period of just green growth. Do you want them to have color in the winter months as well? How awful would it be to use annuals? For the summer season, Silver falls dichondra would be fantastic in them as would the sweet potato vine–there is a pink and white variegated one, or even the Blackie would look good. If you want to try a perennial, try variegated Vinca major or the variegated needlepoint ivy. Creeping jenny would also be nice, but the bright yellow of the foliage might clash–you may want to go with the green one. For color in the pots that is more upright, try the Zahara zinnias, bubblegum pink petunias or angelonia. These are all annuals, but give you way more color in a season than perennials would. Some of the smaller ornamental grasses may also be a perennial option for filler.

(July 2010)

I have some petunias planted in urns and a hanging basket. They all have grown over the edges and are hanging down, which would be beautiful but they are looking ugly and woody. Is it the hot weather? Should I trim them back, if so how much?

If the hanging baskets aren’t large, this often happens to petunias with hot weather. I think they often do better for home gardeners in the ground. They need a lot of fertilizer in containers to keep full and healthy. Petunias are heavy feeders in any situation, but we water pots so much that we leach out the nutrition quickly. Weekly applications of a water soluble fertilizer are needed for petunias in pots to look good. Cut them back by half or if the ends look good, add some more plants to the top of the container to fill in there.

(February 2010)

I have a neighbor that needs some help with her nine window boxes. Her window boxes are 36″ long, 7 1/2 ” wide and 6 ” deep, and they have a nice layer of moss all around, and no plastic liner. There are 4 on the first floor and 5 on the second. They get some morning sun, the 4 on the right more – maybe 4 hours, and the 5 on the left maybe 2-3 hours. Watering is not a problem, but her house is a dark red. Light pinks, yellows, white and any shade of green, especially the silver ones would look good. She would like a cascading effect on the top 5 as they are so high up. Would perennials work? That way she wouldn’t have to replant every year. Any suggestions you have would be wonderful.

There are two reasons I would probably opt for more annuals than perennials. First, I wonder how long perennials would last in these window boxes. The soil temperature will get much colder in these moss lined wire containers than in the ground, the containers aren’t that large, so the volume of soil is smaller, and they will be elevated, so my guess is that most perennials would freeze or at least go totally dormant during the winter. Another downside for flower potential, is that perennials have a defined season of bloom and then they have a period of just green growth. Do you want them to have color in the winter months as well? How awful would it be to use annuals? For the summer season, Silver falls dichondra would be fantastic in them as would the sweet potato vine–there is a pink and white variegated one, or even the Blackie would look good. If you want to try a perennial, try variegated Vinca major or the variegated needlepoint ivy. Creeping jenny would also be nice, but the bright yellow of the foliage might clash–you may want to go with the green one. For color in the pots that is more upright, try the Zahara zinnias, bubblegum pink petunias or angelonia. These are all annuals, but give you way more color in a season than perennials would. Some of the smaller ornamental grasses may also be a perennial option for filler.

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Best petunias to grow

Petunias are popular bedding plants often spotted in enormous hanging baskets adorning pubs and and lamp posts.

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Most bedding petunias are classed as either Multifloras or Grandifloras. Multifloras have a large number of smaller flowers that tend to fare better in inclement weather. Grandifloras have fewer blooms that are large and floppy, so are better grown in a sheltered spot where they’re less vulnerable to wind and rain.

There are hundreds of petunias to grow in a dazzling array of hues and patterns, so there are lots of combinations to be had with other plants. Several varieties of petunia are often seen combined with bidens and trailing lobelias.

Need some inspiration? Check out this wildlife-friendly hanging basket, which uses petunias, or try planting up a petunia and diascia hanging basket.

Discover some of our favourite petunias to grow, below.

‘Black Satin’ is a sumptuous petunia with aubergine-coloured flowers that have satiny sheen to them.
1

Petunia ‘Phantom’

Petunia ‘Phantom’ is an especially eye-catching variety, with velvety black flowers that develop yellow demarcations on each petal as they mature, giving them a starry appearance. This cultivar has an upright, mounding growth habit.

Yellow marked, purple-black blooms of petunia ‘Phantom’ 2

Petunia ‘Rose Vein Velvet’

‘Rose Vein Velvet’ is said to be one of the best petunias to grow from seed. The pink, veined blooms are produced in their masses on trailing stems, up to 1m long. A great cultivar for hanging baskets and window boxes.

Hot-pink blooms of petunia ‘Rose Vein Velvet’ 3

Petunia ‘Black Satin’

‘Black Satin’ is a sumptuous petunia with aubergine-coloured flowers that have satiny sheen to them. This compact variety combines well with light and bright-coloured bedding plants, creating a dramatic contrast.

Aubergine-coloured, satin blooms of petunia ‘Black Satin’ 4

Petunia ‘Bingo Red’

Petunia ‘Bingo Red’ is part of the Bingo series, a group of compact, upright plants available in a range of colours. Being compact, they’re ideal for planting in small pots that can be dotted around.

Vivid red blooms of petunia ‘Bingo Red’ 5

Petunia ‘Priscilla’

The Tumbelina series of petunias includes cultivars like ‘Priscilla’ (pictured), ‘Candy Floss’ and ‘Susanna’. They have ruffled, double flowers that are larger than those of other trailing varieties.

Advertisement A purple-veined, mauve flower of petunia ‘Priscilla’ 6

Petunia ‘Cascadias Rim Magenta’

‘Cascadias Rim Magenta’ is one of the Cascadias petunias, characterised by their trailing habit. They’re ideal for growing in hanging baskets or tumbling over the sides of pots and window boxes. Other Cascadias petunias to grow include ‘Cascadias Indian Summer’ and ‘Cascadias Rim Violet’.

Cream-edged, magenta flowers of petunia ‘Cascadias Rim Magenta’

Climbing Petunias are a unique flowering plant that will scale trellises or other climbing support systems. Petunias are some of the most popular flowering plants out there. With so many colors, textures, shapes, and sizes, that’s no surprise. You can find this variety in colors of white, pink, and lavender.

They’re one of the fastest-growing Petunia varieties, some reaching over 6 feet in length. These flowers have a soft aromatic scent that will bloom from early summer to early fall. Climbing Petunias are very weather-resistant, giving you maximum enjoyment.

We’ve given you a historical background on this variety as well as some growing tips, photo inspiration, and shopping links! Continue reading to learn more about Climbing Petunia.

Botanical Background of Climbing Petunia

Since the discovery of Petunias hundreds of years ago, these plants have been developed and perfected by a team of botanists. When they were first found, they weren’t very impressive or desirable plants. However, the potential was seen in these plants. Though they may have started out as a weak variety, they have become stronger and more desirable.

Now, Petunias are one of the most sought after garden plants. Depending on their growing zone, they may either grow as annuals or perennials. They’re a perfect option for brightening up your garden with little maintenance required. The Climbing Petunia is part of the Wave Petunia series, created in the mid-1990s. Botanists have been perfecting this variety, giving customers quite the Petunia experience.

The word “Petunia” is derived from the word “pety,” meaning tobacco. Interestingly, the Petunia plant is part of the same plant family as tobacco. The Latin name for the Climbing Petunia variety is Petunia x hybrid.

Try these annuals that bloom all summer!

How to Grow Climbing Petunias

Where it Grows

Climbing Petunias will perform best if they’re grown in pots or containers, but they can also be grown right in your garden beds. Wherever you decide to plant them, give them an adequate support system. If they don’t have a trellis or any sort of vertical support, they won’t be able to grow to their full potential.

You’ll be amazed by their vertical growth and abundance of blooms. Get creative with the type of support system you give it to create more garden intrigue.

Size

This variety of Petunia can reach a height of 6 feet, once fully grown. Their climbing ability is what makes them so unique; it’s unlike any other Petunia variety. Their stems are long and lax, making a strong support system necessary for their vertical success. If it’s not trained to grow vertically, it will have a massive spread and work well as a ground cover plant.

Deadhead your flowers to promote future growth and for the continued health of the plant. Pinching the plant at the initiation of each growing season encourages branching and more abundant blooms in the future.

Optimal Growing Zones and Conditions

Climbing Petunias grow as tender perennials in USDA plant hardiness zones 9 through 11, and annuals in the other zones. They tend to prefer growing in warmer climates.

Ideally, its best to plant these Petunias where they’ll have some protection from strong wind. Since this variety has a shallow root system, considering planting them in a region that won’t receive pools of water.

Type of Soil

Rich, moist, well-draining soil is optimal for this type of Petunia’s success and health. In order to reach its full potential, it will need the perfect blend of soil. If your soil is rather devoid of nutrients, consider adding in compost to help fill it with nutrients.

Light, Watering, and Fertilization Requirements

Climbing Petunias grow best in full sun, but they can also grow in partial shade. Luckily, these plants are rather weather-resistant, so they can handle a wide variety of conditions. Getting at least 6 hours of sun during their growing season will give them the healthiest, most abundant blooms.

Water this plant regularly. If planted in a container, you’ll have to keep a more careful watch on making sure you give it an adequate supply of water. Though they’re drought-tolerant, it’s best to water them more during hot, dry spells if you can.

Fertilize your Petunias consistently to provide supplemental health support. Use a combination of liquid and slow-release fertilizer every 10 to 14 days. This will ensure the continued health of your Petunias.

Step by Step Growing Guide

  • Decide if you’re going to plant your Climbing Petunias in containers or in the garden
  • Select a location that will receive about 6 hours of sunlight
  • Plant your seedling or seeds in fertile, well-draining soil
  • Water your plants and don’t allow them to dry out between each watering
  • Fertilize every 10 to 14 days with a slow-release fertilizer formula
  • As your plant grows, train it to climb; you may have to tie some of its stems to its trellis system
  • Enjoy the unique appearance and profuse blooms of your Climbing Petunia plant!

Inspirational Photos of Climbing Petunia

Searching for some ideas of how to incorporate Climbing Petunias into your garden? Look below to view some photos of this plant that may inspire you in your own garden. Gather some creative ideas of how you can use this plant at home.

An Abundance of Climbing Blooms

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Enjoy the shower of blooms that are showcased by this plant. It grows similarly to ivy, but you’ll get the added bonus of beautiful flowers, too.

Daily Growers

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You’ll see a difference in your Climbing Petunias every single day, as they grow rather quickly. If you have a bare area, placing these in that space will quickly fill it. Enjoy tracking their growth as you watch how they climb.

Towering Blooms

This Petunia looks magical in the way that it climbs. Its abundance of blooms creates an eye-catching display. Place your container up against your bare fence to add some beauty and intrigue.

Striking Container Displays

You’ll be able to create stunning displays in your flower containers with your Climbing Petunias. They’ll also work as spillers in the thriller, filler, spiller container combination.

Netting Trellis

If you want to use a low key trellis, try out mesh or metal netting. The plant will quickly take over and hide the netting from sight. Growing up a flexible material will also give your blooms a more fluid appearance in their growth.

Big Impact Plant

Make a big impact in your garden with Climbing Petunias. Their intriguing shape and pattern of growth will be the perfect addition to your garden space.

Trellis Growers

If you’ve always wanted to try out trellis gardening, using the Climbing Petunia is an excellent choice. You can use their growth as a protective, yet decorative privacy screen or simply as an ornamental feature in your garden.

Silver Mounds of Beauty

With the help of a trellis system, your Climbing Petunias can look absolutely stunning. Since this type of Petunia also grows in a mounded habit, you get a large number of blooms. Try planting this variety in multiple flower boxes to make the biggest impact.

Pack a Punch with a Thriller, Filler, Spiller Combo

We’ll bet that you haven’t seen a thriller, filler, spiller combination quite like this one. Using the trellis system with your Climbing Petunia will leave people with a “thriller” as they’ve never seen before. If you want to be bold and take up a lot of vertical space, this is a great option for you.

Fill that Empty Space

If you have an empty corner of your deck or garden, fill that empty space with a tower of Climbing Petunias. These blooms will quickly turn that empty space into something to admire and enjoy.

Trail those Blooms

Although your Climbing Petunias can be trained to climb trellises, you can also let them trail out of a container or along the ground. This makes this plant versatile with its use in the garden.

Petunia Flower Tower

Use a tomato cage to create a tumbling tower full of blooms. The plant will grow inside the cage and then tumble outside of it. The tomato cage offers the perfect amount of support for your Climbing Petunias.

Flowers with a View

If you have a balcony, the perfect way to enhance your view is with a container full of Climbing Petunias. Also, if you live in an apartment, and your only outdoor space is your balcony, what better way to fill that space than with this beautiful plant?

Make a Pattern

Enjoy the creative liberty you have with these climbing plants. Make patterns in your garden border by alternating trellises with your Climbing Petunia with allowing your Climbing Petunia to cover the ground.

Petunia Company

Use multiple varieties of Petunia in your garden. Since there are so many different colors, patterns, shapes, sizes, and textures within the Petunia family, you have a lot of options. Creatively incorporate the many different types to create a beautiful garden aesthetic.

Where to Purchase Climbing Petunia

After reading all about Climbing Petunia and seeing the plant gallery, you’re probably wanting to know where you can get your own. We’ve attached a few links below so that you can plant your very own Climbing Petunia in your garden today. Check them out!

Climbing Petunia Flower Seeds, Assorted Colors

When you order this product, you’ll receive a bag of over 300 seeds. With that amount of seeds, you’ll have a lot of flexibility and options for how and where you want to plant your Petunias. The assorted mix of colors creates a stunning display.

Climbing Petunia Flower Seeds, Purple

You’ll receive over 300 seeds when you order this product. You’ll enjoy the large, beautiful purple blooms.

Climbing Petunia Flower Seeds, White

This order comes with 100 Climbing Petunia seeds. The white blooms make for a beautiful accent or prominent color, depending on the aesthetic you wish to create.

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