Springwood White Heath flowers

Springwood White Heath flowers

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Springwood White Heath in bloom

Springwood White Heath in bloom

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Plant Height: 8 inches

Flower Height: 12 inches

Spread: 24 inches

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 5

Other Names: Spring Heath, Snow Heath, Winter Heath

Description:

An excellent groundcover with white tubular flowers in early spring and deep green needle-like foliage, ideal for poor soils, also great for massing in the garden; requires organic highly acidic soil, full sun and absolutely no standing water

Ornamental Features

Springwood White Heath is clothed in stunning spikes of white bell-shaped flowers with brown overtones rising above the foliage from late winter to mid spring. It has dark green foliage. The tiny needles remain dark green throughout the winter. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes

Springwood White Heath is a multi-stemmed evergreen shrub with a mounded form. It lends an extremely fine and delicate texture to the landscape composition which should be used to full effect.

This is a relatively low maintenance shrub, and should only be pruned after flowering to avoid removing any of the current season’s flowers. It is a good choice for attracting bees to your yard. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Springwood White Heath is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • General Garden Use
  • Groundcover
  • Naturalizing And Woodland Gardens

Planting & Growing

Springwood White Heath will grow to be about 8 inches tall at maturity extending to 12 inches tall with the flowers, with a spread of 24 inches. It tends to fill out right to the ground and therefore doesn’t necessarily require facer plants in front. It grows at a slow rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 20 years.

This shrub should only be grown in full sunlight. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is very fussy about its soil conditions and must have rich, acidic soils to ensure success, and is subject to chlorosis (yellowing) of the leaves in alkaline soils. It is somewhat tolerant of urban pollution. Consider covering it with a thick layer of mulch in winter to protect it in exposed locations or colder microclimates. This is a selected variety of a species not originally from North America.

Heather (White) Meaning

White heather signifies one’s wishes will come true.

Although it is always believed that you can make a wish upon a star, you can actually make your wish come true with a flower too – through the white heather.  You can also give this flower to a friend who is yearning for something – whether regarding financial or relationships. Once your friend gets the white heather flower, he or she will know that whatever he wished for will soon come to fruition.

It’s also about protection from danger. To ensure that their homes were safe, people back in the day used to tuck heather flower under their beds and thatched their roofs with this beautiful flower. And while in a long journey, you can wear a charm made of heather to keep you away from harm’s way! This can be worn around the neck, on the hair or even tied to the button hole of your jacket or blouse.

Name:Â Heather (White)

Color:Â Heather does not only come in shades of lavender but it also come in pure white.

Shape: Â Heather, up close looks like tiny bells.

Fact: Heather has long been associated with rugged rural poverty. That’s why for most of its existence, it’s been a despised plant. People didn’t want to be thought of as poor so heather stayed pretty much where it grew – on the hillsides.

Poisonous: Most of the species of heather are nontoxic. For exotic species, however, you need to exercise care when handling these flowers.

Number of Petals: Â Whether white or lavender, heather flowers have four petals.

Victorian Interpretation: White heather stands for wishes coming true. It’s also deemed as a plant of protection.

Blossom Time: July is the month for white heather. These plants continue to produce flowers until the end of November.

Superstitions: Because it’s a plant is believed to provide protection, people used this as a charm. If people didn’t carry these flowers around with them in their homes, it’s most usually that their beds are stuffed with heather or their roofs are thatched with heather. It is said that if heather is burned – it can cause rain to fall. White heather also made it possible for witches to fly on their broomsticks much faster.

The Shape: Sprigs of heather put together looks like a small broom with little white pieces sticking out from it. On its own, a white heather sprig will look like a bottle brush with some cotton stuck on its bristles. The flowers are actually shaped like a bell drooping from the stem.

Petals: The petals of white heather look different in its stages of growth. When it’s still in the process of forming buds of flowers, heather has long and elongated buds sometimes with black dots on its tips. As a bloomed flower, the petals are shaped more like bells.

Numerology: The flowering evergreen of white heather is number 11 in numerology. This relates to the symbol of wishes and dreams coming true.Â

Color: Heather has two main shades, white and lavender. It would depend on the color of heather what meaning is associated with it. For white heather, this signifies protection. It also symbolizes that one’s wishes will soon come true.

Herbalism and Medicine:  If whole sprigs of heather are used as brooms, it’s the flowering parts that are used as medicine. Heather can be dried and mixed with tea to help with depression or bouts of insomnia. It can be ingested to help with stomach problems. To make a heather infusion, a tablespoon of shoots have to be steeped in hot water. To make a decoction, four tablespoons of shoots should be boiled in water.

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Welcome to Galloway Heathers

Heathers give you all year round colour in your gardens. They are amazingly easy to grow and easy to keep. They will give you great ground cover, which will keep the weeds down. Choose from a range of these very hardy plants some of which were originally grown in the Scottish moorlands and glens. They can withstand most climatic conditions!

Now you can buy them direct from one of Scotland’s best-known grower. Galloway Heathers are based in the Dumfries and Galloway area, a country area with an abundance of moor lands and hills, ideal for bringing on these colourful year round plants. Our heathers are raised to stay fresh, they will last for a good 10 years or so. It is also no bad thing to be buying from north of you. Hardier climates make hardier plants.

Take a browse through the site and look at the range of colours. There are an unbelievable 140 different varieties to choose from so your garden will always be unique to you. We are always adding newer varieties.

Make it easy on yourself. Buy heathers online and they will be delivered to your door. Just think, no carrying, no mess in the back of the car, just your heathers where and when you want them. They can be delivered throughout the UK, every day of every week.

Wherever you plant them, in your garden, in tubs on your patio, in window boxes, Galloway Heathers always bring pleasure and differing colours all year round.

Plantings Instructions

Heathers should be planted in a position where it will be in sun for all or most of the day and, if possible, facing south.

Planting on dry sites or under trees should be avoided.

  • Plantings Instructions

The best winter flowering heathers

Evergreen, easy to grow, small, manageable and long-flowering, heathers are the ideal low-maintenance plant, although their image suffered after their rise in popularity in the 1960s when they became associated with dwarf conifers and dull grasses. Winter-flowering heathers have another great attribute: they are bee-friendly plants. They are a lifeline for bumblebees and solitary bees, which do not store food and emerge in mild spells in winter and early spring.

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Some cultivars have gold or bronze foliage that add colour at ground level, although the combination of pink flowers and yellow foliage is not pleasing to everyone. Some heathers produce compact heads of blooms at the tips of the shoots; in others the blooms crowd a length of the stems. These cultivars make excellent cut flowers, and lend themselves to informal garden and wedding posies.

Here is a selection of the best winter-flowering heathers, chosen by horticulturist and writer Andy McIndoe.

Erica carnea

Erica carnea f. aureifolia ‘Bell’s Extra Special’

Compact heather with sparse, whisky-coloured foliage. heliotrope, almost-red blooms from late winter to mid spring. Bred from ‘Myretoun Ruby’. Height/spread 15cm x 45cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H7, USDA 5a-9b.

E. carnea ‘Clare Wilkinson’

Vigorous and trailing heather with long shots clothed in mid-green foliage. Shell-pink flowers in long spikes in late winter through to late spring. A long season of nectar and pollen. Height/spread 10cm x 45cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H7, USDA 5a-9b.

E. carnea f. alba ‘Isabell’

Spreading mats of short, upright stems carry bright-green foliage. Pure-white flowers with brown stamens from late winter until early spring. Excellent heather for pots and containers. Height/spread 15cm x 45cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H7, USDA 5a-9b.

E. carnea ‘Nathalie’

Glowing purple flowers from midwinter to mid spring. Compact and bristling with dark-green foliage and jewel-like flowers. This heather originated from seedlings of ‘Myretoun Ruby’. Height/spread 15cm x 45cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H7, USDA 9a-9b.

E. carnea ‘Corinna’

A compact, bushy heather with abundant, dark-green foliage. Cerise-pink flowers in late winter to mid spring. A good ground cover plant bred by Kurt Kramer in Germany. Height/spread 15cm x 45cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H7, USDA 5a-9b.

E. carnea ‘December Red’

Vigorous and spreading heather with mid-green foliage that forms low, loose mats. Pink flowers darken to red-pink as they age, opening in midwinter and lasting to early spring. Height/spread 10cm x 30cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H7, USDA 5a-9b.

E. carnea ‘Eva’

Neat and compact heather with dark-green foliage turning bronze in winter. Light-red flowers from late winter to mid spring. It is one of the earliest red-flowering heathers to bloom. Height/spread 10cm x 30cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H7, USDA 5a-9b.

E. carnea ‘Saskia’

Unusual colouring with rose-pink flowers, darker toward the tips and clustered at the end of the shoots from late winter to mid spring. Lovely heather against mid-green foliage. 20cm x 30cm. RHS H7, USDA 5a-9b.

E. carnea ‘Winter Rubin’

Formely called ‘Kramer’s Rubin’, this compact cultivar has dark-green foliage and clear-pink flowers from late winter to mid spring. Selected from seedlings of ‘Myretoun Ruby’. Height/spread 10cm x 30cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H7, USDA 5a-9b.

E. carnea f. alba ‘Whitehall’

With pure white flowers and a similar habit to ‘Isabell’, this heather starts to bloom earlier, in midwinter. The flower spikes are less dense and the brown stamens less prominent. Height/spread 10cm x 30cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H7, USDA 5a-9b.

Erica x darleyensis

E. x darleyensis ‘Arthur Johnson’

Long spikes of magenta-pink flowers, darkening from midwinter to mid spring. Spreading habit with mid-green foliage, the spring shots are tipped with cream. Height/spread 45cm x 60cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H6, USDDA 6a-8b.

E. x darleyensis ‘Aurelie Bregeon’

Comparatively large, lilac-pink heather flowers from late autumn to spring on compact plants with mid-green foliage. A sport of ‘Darley Dale’, it’s not as hardy as other cultivars. Great in pots. Height/spread 30cm x 45cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H5, USDA 7a-9b.

E. x darleyensis ‘Darley Dale’

A popular winter heather with profuse pale-pink flowers, darkening with age from early winter to mid-spring. Mid-green foliage with cream and pink tips to the shoots in spring. Height/spread 30cm x 45cm. Hardiness rating USDA 6a-8b.

E. x darleyensis f. aureifolia ‘Mary Helen’

Mid-pink heather blooms open in late winter to mid spring. The new yellow-gold foliage lasts all summer, turning bronze in winter. Height/spread 20cm x 30cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H6, USDA 6a-8b.

E. x darleyensis f. aurefolia ‘Moonshine’

A bushy heather with yellowish-green foliage that does not darken in winter. The pale-pink flowers open from early winter to mid spring. Height/spread 30cm x 45cm. RHS H6, USDA 6a-8b.

E. x darleyensis ‘Phoebe’

A compact and free-flowering cultivar with profuse, rose-pink flowers from autumn to midwinter. Excellent ground cover, this heather has dark-green foliage and a dense, bushy habit. Height/spread 15cm x 20cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H6, USDA 6a-8b.

E. x darleyensis ‘Katia’

A bushy, compact heather with mid-green foliage, large, pure-white flowers and prominent brown stamens from early to late winter. Excellent with hellebores. Height/spread 30cm x 45cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H6, USDA 6a-8b.

E. x darleyensis ‘Lucie’

A spot of ‘Kramer’s Rote’, with large, showy, magenta flowers on spikes of dark-green foliage in spring. This heather blooms later than many cultivars, so less damaged by frost and rain. Height/spread 45cm x 60cm. Hardiness ratings RHS H6, USDA 6a-8b.

E. x darleyensis f.aureifolia ‘Tweety’

A striking heather with bright, golden-yellow foliage, which turns orange in winter. The sparse, magenta flowers contrast with the foliage from early winter to mid spring. Height/spread 30cm x 45cm. Hardiness ratings RHS 6G, USDA 6a-8b.

E. x darleyensis f. albiflora ‘White Perfection’

Left unpruned, this heather produces long spikes of pure-white flowers with brown stamens from midwinter to mid spring. Height/spread 45cm x 75cm. Hardiness ratings H6, USDA 6a-8b.

You can find more information on plant hardiness ratings here

Where to see

• Holehird Gardens
Patterdale Road, Windermere, Cumbria LA23 1NP. Tel 015394 46008.
• Nymans
Staplefield Lane, Handcross, West Sussex RH17 6EB. Tel 01444 405250.
• RHS Garden Wisley
Wisley, Woking, Surrey GU23 6QB. Tel 0845 260 9000.

Where to buy

• The Heather Garden
Woodlands, Wimborne, Dorset BH21 8LJ. Tel 01202 824387.

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Heathers are widely available from garden centres and nurseries. The Heather Society is a good source of information for choosing and growing heathers. heathersociety.org

Mediterranean White Heath flowers

Mediterranean White Heath flowers

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

* This is a “special order” plant – contact store for details

Height: 15 inches

Spread: 3 feet

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 4b

Other Names: Darley Heath

Description:

An excellent groundcover shrub with white bell flowers in early spring and dark green needle-like foliage; vigorous growing, but prune lightly only to shape; requires organic highly acidic soil, full sun and absolutely no standing water

Ornamental Features

Mediterranean White Heath is covered in stunning spikes of white bell-shaped flowers rising above the foliage from late winter to mid spring, which emerge from distinctive creamy white flower buds. It has dark green foliage. The tiny needles remain dark green throughout the winter. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes

Mediterranean White Heath is a multi-stemmed evergreen shrub with an upright spreading habit of growth. It lends an extremely fine and delicate texture to the landscape composition which should be used to full effect.

This is a relatively low maintenance shrub, and should only be pruned after flowering to avoid removing any of the current season’s flowers. It is a good choice for attracting bees to your yard. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Mediterranean White Heath is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • General Garden Use
  • Groundcover
  • Naturalizing And Woodland Gardens

Planting & Growing

Mediterranean White Heath will grow to be about 15 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 3 feet. It tends to fill out right to the ground and therefore doesn’t necessarily require facer plants in front. It grows at a slow rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 20 years.

This shrub should only be grown in full sunlight. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is very fussy about its soil conditions and must have rich, acidic soils to ensure success, and is subject to chlorosis (yellowing) of the leaves in alkaline soils. It is somewhat tolerant of urban pollution. Consider applying a thick mulch around the root zone in winter to protect it in exposed locations or colder microclimates. This particular variety is an interspecific hybrid.

* This is a “special order” plant – contact store for details

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